What do you think is more difficult: saying no or the follow-through after you'v

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  1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
    ReneeDC1979posted 8 years ago

    What do you think is more difficult: saying no or the follow-through after you've said no.

    I am thinking about choices we make, accepting God, and obeying His word.  We sin so much and struggle to get living right.

  2. CloudExplorer profile image80
    CloudExplorerposted 8 years ago

    Saying no is a very tough thing to do for many people, and this article is a answer to a Q&A question as to having such a potential difficulty. read more

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks again for the hub and response.

  3. Jackie Lynnley profile image88
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 8 years ago

    I do understand what you are talking about and it is so important. Where is our heart really if we don't say no to what is wrong? When we accept God we accept His word and that should be our concentration. We simply say no to our old life and God will bless and take care of the follow-through. It is not magic and not always easy but if we keep our eyes in the right direction, the direction of our new heart, our treasures are there, not behind us.

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Great point Jackie Lynnley, God takes care of the follow-through.

  4. Chris Neal profile image82
    Chris Nealposted 8 years ago

    My experience is that the follow-through is tougher than the intial act. If simply saying 'no' were the end of it then more bad choices would not be made. But whether you're saying 'no' to your kids, your boss (if you have a demanding boss) or your own baser desires (even if the baser desire is simply really, really wanting that hot fudge sundae) it's the follow through, the please please please, the it won't hurt anybody, the who will know?, the okay but I'll remember this, that is often tougher than the initial 'no.'

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with your explanation.  I think saying no can be hard, but it's just a two-letter word and following-through takes a lot more time and effort.

  5. lisasuniquevoice profile image72
    lisasuniquevoiceposted 8 years ago

    ReneeDC1979,

    Saying "No," is the hard thing. I think it's because we feel so relieved after saying it it's easy to follow through.

    Lisa

    1. Insane Mundane profile image61
      Insane Mundaneposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, the follow-through should always be the easy part, once you make up your mind, no matter what it may be.  I think I'm going to say 'yes' and check out your provocative Hubs, Lisa...  LOL!

    2. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you both

  6. Sri T profile image78
    Sri Tposted 8 years ago

    Both are easy for me. I don't worry about sin. Since nobody remains here forever, it is pointless. Why carry guilt trips if it cannot be helped? It's better to enjoy life and forget about it.

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Sri T for your comment.

  7. Alexander Mark profile image81
    Alexander Markposted 8 years ago

    What a great question! I think it is harder to say no initially, although it feels like it's harder to say no after you change your mind. But speaking of the spiritual aspect, if you know you caved in to social pressure or even your own generated pressure to please someone else, and you know you shouldn't do what you agreed to, you are certainly better off cancelling whatever it is you agreed to, no matter how much you are going to offend the other person because it is better to please God than anyone else. Of course, if you are always cancelling things because you can't say no, I would say it is better to go through with whatever it is and suffer for it so you can learn to say no or, "I'll think about it," before hand.

    I am learning through a tough trial right now, that if I feel unsure about something, then I should refuse to follow through because it means the Lord is not in it or at the very least, my subconscious is telling me something important.

    It also helps to think on past experiences and prepare for certain questions that come up and envision your responses and know it is okay to so, "maybe," and later say, "no."

    1. TNSabrina profile image61
      TNSabrinaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Nice comment! I'm sorry to hear that you're going through a tough trial. Just know you will make it through it, and stick with what feels right in your mind, heart, and soul.

    2. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Alexander Mark and I pray you are able to push through your tough trial.

  8. EuroCafeAuLait profile image83
    EuroCafeAuLaitposted 8 years ago

    When you are saying No you are really saying Yes to something better.  The follow up is just sticking to your guns and doing what you believe in.  Good luck smile)

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Nice answer EuroCafeAuLait

  9. annerivendell profile image91
    annerivendellposted 8 years ago

    I don't believe we can get living wrong. I try not to hurt or injure anyone, and I try to be compassionate and help anyone I meet along the way. I don't struggle with life. It was given to me as a gift, and I live it with gratitude every day.

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your comment annierivendell.

  10. PAPA-BEAR profile image61
    PAPA-BEARposted 8 years ago

    Gods word states 'Let your yes mean yes and your no mean no.' However that determination does not always pan out as we plan. Because you mention God I would take the view that God is important to you, so you must learn to rely on him to help you in your weak moments. Pray about what troubles you, be specific to God about the things on your mind, and tell him your goals your intention. He will not let you down.

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you PAPA-BEAR.  I will really focus on being specific with God about things.

  11. watergeek profile image95
    watergeekposted 8 years ago

    The followthrough is more difficult for me. It doesn't have anything to do with God, but more that I don't like people ignoring that I've said no. It's almost like they think their needs carry more weight than mine, or they think I'm lying, or I'm just "reluctant" and have to be "persuaded" - basically pushing (or manipulating) me to go against my will.

    Since I'm female and it's usually men who do it, I see it as a lack of respect and tend to get mad. Then I have to figure out how to let go of the anger, so I can say "no" again more firmly, without being defensive.

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you watergeek.  Unfortunately, people do not take our word as it is.  We have to show them we are serious.

  12. tsadjatko profile image66
    tsadjatkoposted 8 years ago

    Boy, this is a question that really makes you think and search your soul doesn't it, and thanks for asking it! After reading some answers I guess I am and have always been a horse of a different color because neither saying no or the follow-through have ever posed a problem for me, as far as I can remember. However I do not take deciding to say NO lightly either.
    To say NO, once the facts are in, I make a decision, easy enough for me because I generally see things as either black or white, so to speak, and then I simply stick to my guns and actually feel like I have no choice to do otherwise.
    As far as the follow through, I think I have no problem there mainly because I abhor hypocrites and I would feel like one if I said no and reneged.
    Of course, there is always an exception to the rule isn't there. Once in my youth I had a girlfriend to whom I was irresistibly attracted (it was all chemistry) but with whom I had little in common with and who loved herself more than she could love anyone else. Once I really got to know her I realized it was a black and white situation (which I tried hard to see as grey) but in the end saying NO was the hardest thing I ever did and following through was just as hard...but I did what I knew I had to do and that situation probably has something to do with why I am the way I am today.

    1. tsmog profile image80
      tsmogposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting and a powerful observation. I have hope you will discover strength while knowing just sharing your insight offers hope to others as well.

    2. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      You're welcome.  Glad I am getting so much feedback from the question. Thank you for sharing your personal experience.

  13. TNSabrina profile image61
    TNSabrinaposted 8 years ago

    Both. I hate saying no, and then I feel guilty about it. I’ve learned that you have to say it at times or people will walk all over you.

    1. ReneeDC1979 profile image60
      ReneeDC1979posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I totally agree Sabrina.  Now that I have started a nonprofit organization, I have learned to say the word NO more often because people do not have your best interest at heart, unfortunately.

 
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