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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (15 posts)

Did you know that Barabbas' name was also Jesus? Which one was the real Jesus?

  1. vveasey profile image84
    vveaseyposted 17 months ago

    Did you know that Barabbas' name was also Jesus? Which one was the real Jesus?

    See  more below!

    Barabbas or Jesus Barabbas (a Hellenization of the Aramaic bar abba ?? ???, literally "son of the father" or "Jesus, son of the Father" respectively) is a figure mentioned in the accounts of the Passion of Christ, in which he is an insurrectionary whom Pontius Pilate freed at the Passover feast in Jerusalem, instead of releasing Jesus.(Wikipedia)

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/9151419_f260.jpg

  2. Titen-Sxull profile image87
    Titen-Sxullposted 17 months ago

    This is a problem for those viewing the Gospels solely as legitimate historical accounts because it is such an obvious literary device.

    Jesus is being set up in the story as both scapegoat and passover lamb. In Jewish tradition the sins would be passed onto one goat which would be set free into the wilderness while the other "innocent" goat would be sacrificed. So the idea is that Jesus and Barabbas are the two goats. It's a fairly clever use of symbolism but makes little sense for those attempting to take the story as literal historical truth.

    1. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Interesting! You seem to be taking the story literally about the goats. But the question remains...which one is the real goat/Jesus son of the father?

    2. Ericdierker profile image52
      Ericdierkerposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Isn't this like asking if it were Eric Dierker or Eric Smith? Seems like old Bafabbas was Barabbas and Christ was Jesus Christ. Who was resurrected - He had the wounds.

    3. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Eric, he was called Jesus of Nazareth. Messiah is from Hebrew, māshīach meaning anointed, Collins English Dictionary. Kings of Israel were Messiahs. When the Old Testament calls anyone God's anointed, it means they are God's Messiah.

    4. Ericdierker profile image52
      Ericdierkerposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      So are you suggesting that the early church hierarchy re-labeled in order to change thought. I often have thought that the Council of Nicea kind of combined some stories into one. But you point out clear labeling. So it was not Barabbas - right?

    5. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Eric all I'm saying is, if you believe this story is true there were
      two Jesus who were called "son of the father" on trial. One's first name was omitted. So most people think his name was "Barabbas" unaware that's a title meaning "son of the father"

    6. Say Yes To Life profile image80
      Say Yes To Lifeposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      The Bible tells us the story of Jesus of Nazareth's life.  Nothing is said about Barabas.  That should settle the matter.

    7. Titen-Sxull profile image87
      Titen-Sxullposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      It's a literary device, the story is saying Jesus is like one of the goats in the scapegoat ritual. This is why they both have the same name. The guilty Jesus goes free, the innocent Jesus is sacrificed.

  3. Say Yes To Life profile image80
    Say Yes To Lifeposted 17 months ago

    Interesting point - except how does this help end the war in Syria?  Or assist iits fleeing refugees?

    1. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Yoleen! Thanks for your comments, but, that's not the answer to the question.

    2. Ericdierker profile image52
      Ericdierkerposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Yoleen I just caught this and it made me wonder about our current state of lack of communication. A complex interesting question here is met with angst about Syria. I say we should look into waste in schools and am met with so and so is evil.  ???

    3. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Messiah, from Late Latin Messias, from Greek Messias, from Aramaic meshiha and Hebrew mashiah "the anointed" (of the Lord), from mashah "anoint." This is the word rendered in Septuagint as Greek Khristos (or Christ)

        (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

    4. Say Yes To Life profile image80
      Say Yes To Lifeposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      What I meant is, what difference does it make?  You're quibbling over some detail about people whose existence has never been solidly proven.  Even if they really lived, Christ's sacrifice was made nearly 2000 years ago - and evil still continues.

  4. profile image60
    peter565posted 16 months ago

    Check out this short documentary on this topic, it would answer your question https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hg2nB5mrZbE

 
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