Will Satanism work to separate state and Church?.

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  1. Castlepaloma profile image77
    Castlepalomaposted 2 years ago

    I see a growing groups, they formed different kinds of Santanism churches nationwide.  Their goal it seem to separate State and Church. In which, I am in agreement with, except they are just another Religion. Why not just more kindness in this world, rather than more religions.

    I base my life on good sense. The 10 commandments from the Bible or santaism rules can be boil down to 2 rules .
    Do not harm and be honest.

    Since Satan believes in God it makes no sense to use it to separate Church and States because you become another form of Religious church or problem. Beside Satan is God's adversary.
    Best to stick to non believers, for they are fastest growing group in the world anyway. You don't to have to build a phony church to collect your lying taxes.

    Non believers would not need to create hate, or be against something that can lead to harm and dishonesty. In order to protect their group.

    Your thoughts?

    1. The0NatureBoy profile image57
      The0NatureBoyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Brother Castlepaloma, by the definition of church where it's written upon this rock I will build this church which means to call out from. Now look at the many places the Christ for sake civilization, become a nomad and go into all the world that all except John's is written several times, the first one five. Doesn't that suggest the Christ had already separated church and state? Then take into account his telling us to store our riches in heaven and another place and answer why do we work for things ofc this world when we are called out from only by being church and why the church and state is already separated.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image77
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Jesus came with a sword. Is that mean Jesus was an anarchist?

        1. Live to Learn profile image78
          Live to Learnposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Please point out one instance where Jesus wielded a sword.

          1. The0NatureBoy profile image57
            The0NatureBoyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            The verbal sword, And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit everlasting life in Matthew 19:29 and John 3:8 The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit are two places he wielded a sword.

            1. Live to Learn profile image78
              Live to Learnposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              These are not verbal swords, unless you choose to see them as such.

              1. The0NatureBoy profile image57
                The0NatureBoyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                They were instructing us to forsake everything civilization has to offer, that's as much of a sword as we will find to get back into environmental living that the Garden in Eden symbolizes.

          2. Castlepaloma profile image77
            Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, Jesus was more or less not described as violent. Except the money changer made him Madd as hell. I really really dislike bankers too.

        2. The0NatureBoy profile image57
          The0NatureBoyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I don't accept that notion, I rather say, as Genesis interprets the sword it means to cut man away from all attachments and the flame purifies man's minds from good and evil so those man who do can have eternal life. Where he said that he did say he would divide the family so it has to contain the flame for purifying our minds of the concepts of god/devil, good/evil and the there judgmental adjectives. That's how I see it.

        3. MizBejabbers profile image91
          MizBejabbersposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I think he meant the sword as figurative, but Jesus has been defined as an anarchist because of some of the methods he used and the beliefs he held. And there is such a thing as Christian Anarchism.

          https://www.anti-state.com/jesus-is-an-anarchist/

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_anarchism

      2. MizBejabbers profile image91
        MizBejabbersposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Elijah, I think that Jesus was separating church and state when he said (paraphrasing) to render under God what is Gods, and unto Caesar what is Caesar's. Before the Romans interferred in Jewish society, their religion was their state government. I've always felt that the verse "bring ye the tithes into the storehouse" was not commanding giving to God himself (what would god do with all that grain and foodstuff?), but was putting away the crops for the populace and animals to eat during the winter and also providing food for the temple leaders who didn't not engage in animal husbandry or growing grain. A form of socialism, the foodstuffs were doled out by the religious leaders, and some was given to the poor who were able to contribute little or none.
        The widow's mite that today's greedy preachers use as an example to soak their congregation was probably used by the rabbis and temple rulers to purchase other needed supplies, and possibly to line their pockets. Today preachers demand 10% for "God," and the government demands even more, leaving the poor U.S. taxpayer probably less than 50% of what he or she makes to live on.
        But I think Castlepaloma's question was probably aimed at the U.S. constitutional government. Our constitution made it illegal for this country or any state to adopt an official religion. Christianity has for years tried to say that this country was built on Christianity and that our forefathers were Christians -- and to sneak their religion into our laws. Some of our forefathers professed a religion, but regardless, most were Masons who tried to keep the new government secular. That way the religious could worship how they pleased, and the non-religious had the right to not be hassled by the religious.

  2. Castlepaloma profile image77
    Castlepalomaposted 2 years ago

    Maybe christainity think Satan is more of a myth nowadays.
    Good, then non believers ultimate plan is working , we shall overcome.

  3. Nathanville profile image94
    Nathanvilleposted 2 years ago

    Separation of Church and State. 

    Britain is a bit of an Enigma, you could even say schizophrenic (split personality), when it comes to the question of ‘Separation of Church and State’!!!!

    On the One Hand:-

    •    The classical definition of the ‘State’ in the UK is that of the ‘Queen’ is the Head of State, and she herself has ‘Divine’ providence. 
    •    Representation in the House of Lords (the upper chamber in Parliament) includes 26 Bishops (Church of England), and
    •    For historical reason Catholics don’t have the same legal rights in Parliament or the Monarchy as the Church of England.

    Yet in Practice:-

    •    Britain is now recognised as a Secular State, and
    •    Over 52% of the British population are none-religious.

    The UK’s National Anthem portrays the classic view of the tie between State and Religion in Britain; something which used to be played all the time decades ago.  But I haven’t heard our National Anthem being played in years.  These days each nation (including Cornwall) within the UK tend to play their own ‘National Anthem’ instead e.g. the English National Anthem being ‘Jerusalem’ (another Enigma considering most Brits are not religious)!!!!

    National Anthem: England – Jerusalem:  https://youtu.be/rT1HEXNI9c4

    If you can fathom out the British then you deserve a medal – LOL.

    1. The0NatureBoy profile image57
      The0NatureBoyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Nathanville, I listened to that and realized there is merit in my saying the Bible's Jacob is a symbol of the Europeans and especially England, you have it right there in your Anthem.

      I deducted from the Bible that civilization began in the east with Asia being the garden, Cain's land of nod the Americas, Esau is Africa and England and Europe is Jacob, yet I had never, to my knowledge, heard England's National Anthem; Thanks for sharing it.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image77
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        In Canadian public school. First thing every morning everyone needed to sing :God save the Queen: We also celebrate her birthday this next coming 24 weekend. A day off is all I really care.

        1. profile image0
          jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          May 24 was the birthday of Queen Victoria, not Queen Elizabeth.  It was designated "Empire Day."

        2. Nathanville profile image94
          Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          It’s interesting how the British Monarch’s birthday celebrations vary across the Commonwealth.  In Britain the Queen celebrates two birthdays; her real birthday, which is on 21st April (and which she celebrates in private with her family), and her Official Birthday which in the UK is always on the second Saturday of June (which is the 8th June this year).  The exact date for the Official Birthday is up to each Monarch e.g. her father, George VI celebrated his official birthday on the second Thursday of June each year. 

          The King or Queen has celebrated two birthdays in Britain since the Realm of King George II in 1748.  A British tradition that dates back over 270 years entirely due to the British weather e.g. King George II real birthday was in November, which was too cold and wet for an annual birthday parade.

          Having had a quick look at Wikipedia, it seems that while some commonwealth countries celebrates the Queen’s birthday on the same day as Britain; others celebrate it on different dates; and yes (according to Wikipedia) Canada’s celebration in May is in honour of Queen Victoria’s ‘Real’ birthday. 

          I also note from Wikipedia that the Queen’s Official Birthday is a ‘Public Holiday’ in some Commonwealth countries.  While it’s not a public holiday in the UK for everyone, it is for Government Workers, who don’t actually get the day off on the Queens Official Birthday (Second Saturday in June 2019), but rather have the holiday (in honour of her birthday) attached to the Spring Bank Holiday (The last Monday in May).   

          Nothing ever seems to be simple with the British – LOL

        3. MizBejabbers profile image91
          MizBejabbersposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          When I was in elementary school, we were required to begin every morning with the saying the Pledge of Allegiance and singing America the Beautiful. I don't think they do that anymore. In fact, most schools don't teach civics anymore at all.
          At that time our state law said we always had to begin the day with a Bible verse. But then cases taken to the U.S. Supreme Court banned prayer in public schools, ((atheist) Madlyn Murray O'hare in Murray v Curlett and (Jewish) Engle v Vitale). I actually couldn't find any law banning reading the Bible, probably because in 1963, the Supreme Court ruled that the Bible could be taught from a secular historical perspective. But some religionists still believe that both prayer and Bible reading are banned from public schools.

  4. profile image0
    jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years ago

    Personally, I sit somewhat "on the fence."
    Having emigrated to Australia over 40 years ago and acquired citizenship a few years later, I get a sense of being British basically with a strong leaning to my Australian loyalty.
    I see the attributes and shortcomings of both nations. 
    Her Majesty is my Queen as citizen of each country, to whom have strong loyalty. 
    But there is an Australian quality which tends not to accept nonsense for granted.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image77
      Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I Like that no nonsense approach Australians have. It's probably why I get along with them so easily.

      1. Nathanville profile image94
        Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Likewise, I have cousins living in Brisbane, Queensland, who we frequently chat to via skype; and over the years, through chatting with them I've learnt a lot about the Australian culture.

    2. Nathanville profile image94
      Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yep, the British people are going through an identity crisis at the moment; the nation is split, with too many Brits arrogantly believing that Britain is too important in the world to sink, and that we can somehow return to the ‘Glory Days’ of the Old ‘British Empire’ of the 19th Century!!!!  ‘Pride before a Fall’?  While the other half of the British Population recognises that we are not the ‘Great Empire’ we once were, and are dependent on our neighbours for survival e.g. strength in numbers.

      Bureaucracy has got worse in the last couple of decades; and with one CCTV for every 10 people, Britain has become very much a 1984 State (The Film).  So you probably left at a good time.

      Although, on the positive side:  I do love a lot of the ‘Pomp and Circumstances’ of British Politics, which has evolved over the millennia (and still evolving), with its roots stemming from the Magna Carta of 1215.  I actually enjoy watching the Parliamentary Channel on Cable TV when major debates are taking place; the Speaker can be very entertaining at times – Or am I just a nerd! LOL.   

      Plus I do love all the quirky British Cultural Customs and Traditions e.g. the Pearly Kings and Queens in London, the Morris Dancers in Devon and Cornwall, and the cheese rolling in Gloucestershire etc.

      Watch a Downhill Cheese-Chasing Competition in Britain:  https://youtu.be/cvuktushEhY

      London's Pearly Kings & Queens:  https://youtu.be/O12FEKTHzlI

      I also love the British ‘Dry’ and ‘Deep’ sense of humour (which is lost on many Americans); plus the ‘war time’ spirit, ‘stiff upper lip’, and the British ‘stubbornness’ is still quite evident in Society when the situation dictates.

      1. profile image0
        jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        The Scots are proud to be Scotish; Welsh to be Welsh; Irish to be proud, micky-taking Paddies.....But we English don't know how to stick any pride under our hat.
        You are right ... identity crisis.

        1. Nathanville profile image94
          Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          And the Cornish, or ‘Kernow’ as they prefer to be called (with their own culture, flag, language, and National Anthem), are also proud to be Cornish (Celtic).

          The Cornish word for English tourists is Emmet; Old English for ‘Ant’.

          I don’t know if you were aware that (after 15 years of campaigning by the Cornish people) in 2014 the Conservative British Government (using EU Law) granted ‘National Minority Status’ to Cornwall; giving them the same legal status as the Celts in Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

          This video of 2012 was part of the campaign by Cornish people in their campaign for recognition of ‘National Minority Status’:- https://youtu.be/-nN9I_7djgo

          And this was the day in 2014 when the British Government granted ‘National Minority Status’ to Cornwall: - https://youtu.be/vmzA8v3H5nw

          1. profile image0
            jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks for this.  Most interesting!  I was aware of some of it, but being away we don't keep up to every bit of news.
            I have had thoughts of returning for an extended period.  Might do so yet....one day before I reach 100

          2. profile image0
            jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            "The Cornish word for English tourists is Emmet; Old English for ‘Ant’."

            Tasmania is a little bit like Cornwall, also similar to Wales.
            And it's in the Ant-ipodes, so the Emmet could be me, suppose....smile

            1. Nathanville profile image94
              Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              LOL, Yep; I love your comparison.

              I’ve been called Emmet quite a few times on some of my Cornish Holiday videos on YouTube; but I don’t take offence, I play up to it (and a few times have written back to them in a little bit of Kernowek (Cornish language) , because I fully support Cornwall’s fight to preserve their cultural heritage.

              1. profile image0
                jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                Indeed!

            2. theraggededge profile image98
              theraggededgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              I'm Cornish. I live in Wales. I also practice witchcraft and voted for Brexit. I'm a total lost cause big_smile

              1. Nathanville profile image94
                Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                You’re in good company:  Apart from me having a Bristolian (West Country) Accent; which I am proud of, in spite of its ‘farmers Gills’ image; my wife is also half Irish and half Essex (for the benefit of non-Brits, two British culture groups that are often the butt of jokes).

                Do you cross paths in your circle with any Wiccans (Pagan Witchcraft)? 

                Also, I assume you had nothing to do with the current Brexit deadline being Halloween?  LOL.

      2. MizBejabbers profile image91
        MizBejabbersposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        "I also love the British ‘Dry’ and ‘Deep’ sense of humour (which is lost on many Americans); plus the ‘war time’ spirit, ‘stiff upper lip’, and the British ‘stubbornness’ is still quite evident in Society when the situation dictates."

        Yes, I had noticed that the British have a very different sense of humor from most Americans. Why do you think that is?

        1. Nathanville profile image94
          Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          That’s a long subject in itself (many reasons), but perhaps the most fundamental difference was summed up Stephen Fry when he said comedy:

          “Strikes at the heart of American Optimism”,

          And then went onto say:-

          “In a sense, comedy is the microcosm that allows us to examine the entire difference between our two cultures; ours [British] is bathed in failure, but we make a glory of our failure, we celebrate it……”

          This video sums it up well:-

          British Humour Explained:  https://youtu.be/F5wz77P_C70

  5. psycheskinner profile image83
    psycheskinnerposted 2 years ago

    Satanism, as you describe, does not include a literal belief in Satan.  It makes perfect sense to use something that offends many Christians to make them choose between including Satan or not including religion at all. In a nutshell, that's the whole point of the movement.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, Psycheskinner, because under our constitution, Satanists are equal to Christians. They are also an anathema to Christians, so what could be more abhorrent to Christains than Satanists being allowed to exercise their equality when Christians try to push their religious statues and practices onto society in general (like in public places).

      1. Castlepaloma profile image77
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        The Satanic Temple has earned the same tax-exempt status as a church by the IRS. I suppose Atheists have the same registrar Religion rights too.

        The Satanic Temple is growing rapidly, with around 20 chapters across the US, and affiliate groups in Canada, Australia, Germany, and the UK.
        While members of the Satanic Temple see the mythological, and literary, figure of Satan as a symbol of rebellion against tyranny, many do not worship Satan in any way and some do.

  6. profile image0
    jonnycomelatelyposted 2 years ago

    Back to the subject of church, I am much more in tune with Elijah's views.  I see the writings about God and Jesus as being primarily metaphoric.  (A metaphor being an attempt to explain the unexplainable.)
    If I try to describe to you how I am feeling, I might say "I am over the moon!" or "I feel like a sack of potatoes."   You know full well that I can't space-walk and I'm shaped more like a bag of bones, but you get the jist of how I feel.
    God cannot be described without metaphor.  Imagining Jesus as a fellow human allows us to attach various human attributes to him that we know and feel. Then, desiring to link that human life to the concept of "God," as an ideal father-figure, opens up a veritable storehouse of metaphors.
    Anything to do with our inner psychology, our core "being," also requires that facility of metaphor.  Yet most of the arguments come from treating the metaphor as real, not virtual (to use modern computer terminology).  If you do that with me, I will more than likely come tumbling down on you ....like a sack of potatoes!

    1. Nathanville profile image94
      Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Well put; very precise, and to the point. 

      My sentiments exactly.

 
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