the root of all measuring systems

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  1. lovetherain profile image72
    lovetherainposted 2 months ago

    the English foot. It is amazing that it is still used today

    or is it really a coincidence? I find it hard to believe that God would give humanity this system only once,and let it go into disrepair for ever. I think God is in the process of reviving the old system, the divine system, which is the measure of a man

    1. aware profile image68
      awareposted 2 months agoin reply to this
  2. Live to Learn profile image81
    Live to Learnposted 2 months ago

    ???

    1. lovetherain profile image72
      lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      The remnants of the divinely created measuring system is seen in the different feet used around the world, in modern and ancient times. The English foot is the ROOT foot that all other feet are derived from, in the form of fractions(175/176 and 440/441 mainly) This system is created by God,and is based on the measure of the Earth,and the measure of a canoncal MAN

  3. wilderness profile image97
    wildernessposted 2 months ago

    Ancient Egyptians, long before the establishment of England or the English people, used a variety of measurements, with the cubit being one of the primary ones.  Their system was based on forearms, hands and fingers as well as standard lengths of rope.

    The yellow emperor in China, at about 3000 BC, created a system of measurement based on body lengths, but there is no mention of the foot.  During the Shang Dynasty a system of standardized measurements was created in the decimal system - metric, in other words.  Again no mention of the foot.

    All cultures have designed some kind of measurement system, all differ, and all were created by man, not their local god.  Certainly Christian notion of a god did not create them a thousand years before Christianity was known.  The [i]foot/i] was hardly the basis for the world's measurement of length, not to mention other types of measurement such as area, weight, volume, etc.

    1. lovetherain profile image72
      lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      All hogwash, but I forgive you as you have been indoctrinated, and haven't found a way to force yourself out of it yet.

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Naw - I just read history.  And Wikipedia, plus a hefty dose of common sense.

        One can complain the Chinese, the Aztecs, the Incas, etc. had no measurement system until Christianity was introduced but that is patently false.  You do not build the cities and buildings they did without being able to measure things.

        1. lovetherain profile image72
          lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          They used the same system as everyone else.

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            ??  Can't be - you said it came from God - I'm assuming the Christian god in this case.  And that particular god was unknown to those people. 

            But how do you figure that measurements based on the size of a palm or finger are the same as those based on the size of a human foot?

            1. lovetherain profile image72
              lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              Not the Christian God.

              1. wilderness profile image97
                wildernessposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                Oh.  Which one, then, was recognized by all the peoples of earth at any one time (not counting "Lucy" of Olduvai Gorge or her immediate kinfolk)?

                1. lovetherain profile image72
                  lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  I don't presume to know God.

                  1. MizBejabbers profile image89
                    MizBejabbersposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    Which god?

            2. lovetherain profile image72
              lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              The foot is the root measure. it is not based on a person's foot, but the sixth part of a canonical man.

              vitruvius

        2. IslandBites profile image87
          IslandBitesposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          True. Aztecs used the Mexica metric system.

          In case you're wondering.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlalcuahuitl

    2. MizBejabbers profile image89
      MizBejabbersposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Wilderness, the foot is the number 12, which is a multiple of 3, and therefore sacred numbers to some of the old religions. I believe this may have come from the Kaballah, and maybe even the Babylonians before that. Seven is also a number from the same ancient source and was picked up by the Christian Bible, i.e. God rested on the seventh day. Before Mohammed and his Muslims took over the Middle East, the Arabic people had the most advanced mathematicians and scientists of the day. Their regressive belief in Allah ruined their civilization, and today it is hard to believe that they were at one time such an advanced people.

      But I agree with you that there were other units of measure used such as the arm. (Perhaps after the ruination of the Middle Eastern civilization.) But thank goodness, measures were standardized. Nobody would want to buy a yard of cloth measured by my arm, now my tall, simian-armed husband's measurement would be to their advantage.

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Interesting.  But...a number is not a unit of measurement at all.  Twelve what?  Inches?  (A flourescent light bulb was measured in eighths of an inch - a "12" was an inch and a half in diameter) Miles?  It is a number (of units perhaps) but not the unit itself.  If a board is 12 long it says nothing whatsoever about the length.

        1. MizBejabbers profile image89
          MizBejabbersposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          I don't remember, I read that sometime ago. I just remember reading that it was based on 12 rather than the metric system, which is based on 10. So I guess that somebody came up with a unit for 12 of them to make a foot. Just like somebody came up with units for the metric system.
          About the 12-long board, one would have to specify whether it was 12 inches or 12 feet. I think a unit would have to be subjective whether it is in the metric system or the American system. Or whether it was in the 21st century or ancient Egypt or Babylon. Somebody comes up with it and somebody passes it on. I was just explaining that it didn't originate in the Christian Bible, but in antiquity. That tells me that "God" didn't come down here and ordain it.

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            I haven't the faintest where "12" came from as a base for numbering/measuring systems.  But as far back as the Shang dynasty (1000 BC) a standardized measurement was used, not a subjective one such as a foot or an arm's length.

            Seems to me that "10" is the most likely system, because we have 10 fingers to count on and should be familiar with that number, but even hexadecimal (the common computer programming number base) has been used in ancient times.  Egyptians, I think, but would have to look it up again.

            So a measurement system needs not only a unit of measure (foot, meter, light year, whatever) but a numbering system to express the actual measurement in.  Plus, of course, more units for volume, temperature, area, pressure, etc.

            And no, given the vast number of differing systems, both numerical and units, there is exactly zero chance a god gave it to man.  A thousand different gods, perhaps, but not just one.  Unless confusion was the objective - most Americans still haven't a clue how much a centimeter is, let alone a parsec, erg, ohm or light year. big_smile

      2. IslandBites profile image87
        IslandBitesposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Their regressive belief in Allah ruined their civilization, and today it is hard to believe that they were at one time such an advanced people.

        Wow. SMH

  4. Live to Learn profile image81
    Live to Learnposted 2 months ago

    This has to be the weirdest assumption I've run across in a while.

    1. lovetherain profile image72
      lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Well the universe IS weird

      1. Live to Learn profile image81
        Live to Learnposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

        So you measure weirdness in feet or parsecs?

        1. lovetherain profile image72
          lovetherainposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

          No I try to figure out why it is so strange.

  5. IslandBites profile image87
    IslandBitesposted 2 months ago

    Peyote.

    1. lovetherain profile image72
      lovetherainposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Don't you have some more Glamour Shots to take? Leave thought to those who think.

      1. IslandBites profile image87
        IslandBitesposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        lol

      2. Don W profile image83
        Don Wposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        Don't you have some more Glamour Shots to take? Leave thought to those who think.

        Is that an insult you typically use, or is it specially reserved for women who challenge your views?

        And why would being glamorous prevent someone from also being thoughtful anyway? That doesn't make sense.

 
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