Only a small percent of the human brain is actually used...

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  1. Seek-n-Find profile image89
    Seek-n-Findposted 6 years ago

    I saw the movie "Limitless" last night.  I've thought about this before, but I was wondering what your thoughts are on the ability to unlock  and use a greater capacity of the human brain.  The statistic I think I heard before is that we use about 20%.  Do you think humans used to be able to access more of their brain?  Do you think there is a way to access more of our brain today?  And if so, how do you think that would change our human experience?

    1. SimeyC profile image96
      SimeyCposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      There are various arguments about this on the web and in the scientific world. Brain Scans have proven that at some point the majority of the brain is actually used although at some given point in time only 20% may be in use.

      It's one of the most contested scientific questions of all!

      1. Seek-n-Find profile image89
        Seek-n-Findposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        It this is one of the most contested scientific arguments of all...then this should end up being quite an interesting forum!  :-)

        1. A Troubled Man profile image59
          A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          And yet, it isn't a contested scientific argument at all. It is in fact a laughable myth.

          "Though an alluring idea, the "10 percent myth" is so wrong it is almost laughable, says neurologist Barry Gordon at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. Although there's no definitive culprit to pin the blame on for starting this legend, the notion has been linked to the American psychologist and author William James, who argued in The Energies of Men that "We are making use of only a small part of our possible mental and physical resources." It's also been associated with to Albert Einstein, who supposedly used it to explain his cosmic towering intellect.

          The myth's durability, Gordon says, stems from people's conceptions about their own brains: they see their own shortcomings as evidence of the existence of untapped gray matter. This is a false assumption. What is correct, however, is that at certain moments in anyone's life, such as when we are simply at rest and thinking, we may be using only 10 percent of our brains.

          "It turns out though, that we use virtually every part of the brain, and that [most of] the brain is active almost all the time," Gordon adds. "Let's put it this way: the brain represents three percent of the body's weight and uses 20 percent of the body's energy."

          lol

          1. SimeyC profile image96
            SimeyCposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            It's contested by Psychics all over the world smile

            And a lot of scientists say that labelling the 10% statement as a myth is also misleading!

            What do I think? 'If I only had a brain'!

            1. Pcunix profile image92
              Pcunixposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              What "scientists"?

              The 10% nonsense went out when we realized how hard it is to make a computer with even the brain power of a worm, never mind a large mammal.

              Any "scientist" who contests that is an idiot.

            2. A Troubled Man profile image59
              A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              lol lol <--- coveted double laughie



              What scientists?

              1. Nouveau Skeptic profile image74
                Nouveau Skepticposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                Pretty much an scientist who has read the research and looked at the scans of people's brains responding to different inputs. (Including me, an experimental psychologist).

    2. A Troubled Man profile image59
      A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That is a myth. Humans use all of their brains capacity and functionality.

      1. melpor profile image93
        melporposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        TroubleMan is right, we use all of our brain. This is a misconception.  How can you use just a part of your brain?

        1. couturepopcafe profile image61
          couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Lack of neural pathways which deliver information via electrical currents.  Alzheimer's sufferers are an extreme example of brain neural deficiency but many people fall in the grey area (no pun intended) and cannot understand why, no matter what they try, they can't seem to 'get it together'.

  2. profile image0
    ThomasRydderposted 6 years ago

    That's absolutely incorrect..how can you parallel the brain usage of someone who achieves a doctorate with one who digs ditches for a living? (with apologies to ditch diggers).

    1. A Troubled Man profile image59
      A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      LOL! You're confusing an education with a lack of education, which has nothing to do with human brain functionality.

      1. profile image0
        ThomasRydderposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        No, I'm not...I'm saying the person who achieved the doctorate used more of his brain than someone who is a high school grad...

        1. A Troubled Man profile image59
          A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Now, you're confusing effort to get an education with no effort to get an education.

          1. profile image0
            ThomasRydderposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Nope...effort doesn't have anything to do with it. That's lack of initiative or funds or guidance. Scenario 1. A person goes to school, pursues an education, achieves a doctorate, goes on to be a surgeon. Scenario 2. A person attends high school, graduates with average grades, gets a job as a burger flipper at mickey d's. Taking all the little avenues like effort and those other convenients escapes away, the surgeon brain is utilized MUCH more than the drive up window guy.

            1. Mikel G Roberts profile image77
              Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              -or- A guy gets a highschool education and can't get anything but a job in the U.S. Patent Office...

              -or- A guy barely gets through highschool, but at 9 years old writes a symphony that to this day is considered one of the greatest in human history...

              -or- A guy is a lowly carpenter that never went to college at all and changes the world with the thoughts of his "under-used" brain...

              -or- A guy goes to college gets a degree and can't even read...


              I believe your self-image/self-esteem must be based on your degree or lack there of.

              1. A Troubled Man profile image59
                A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                lol So, how did he get the degree?

                1. Mikel G Roberts profile image77
                  Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  Paid someone that can read... Cheated while he was really really good at sports. roll

                  1. A Troubled Man profile image59
                    A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                    Sorry, I don't buy that fairy tale.

              2. profile image0
                ThomasRydderposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                Ahhh...so we attack my self-esteem or supposed lack of self-esteem or education in lieu of an intelligent argument....what splendid technique

              3. profile image0
                ThomasRydderposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                example one might be a result of the economy
                example two someone who discovered their calling later in life
                example three-Jesus Christ is the Son of God...he has an advantage
                example four-that guy didn't apply himself.

                Summary-none of these even address the subject at hand. Go find another conversation that deals with the economy or career planning.

                1. Mikel G Roberts profile image77
                  Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  Summary-none of these even address the subject at hand. Go find another conversation that deals with the economy or career planning.

                  Yes Sir!

                  On my way... hmm where is that hand salute smiley when I need him???

                2. Mikel G Roberts profile image77
                  Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  Einstein is example one, did he use less of his brain than a surgeon?

                  Mozart was example two, did he use less of his brain?


                  roll


                  This guy is an example of the many professional athletes that have come out of colleges in the U.S. They applied themselves at thier sports, does that mean they have used less of thier brain? I think not.


                  ***Try and keep up there Thomas.

            2. A Troubled Man profile image59
              A Troubled Manposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              And, nothing to do with brain functionality. Sure, there are lots of reasons why people don't get an education. But, to say one person uses 20% of their brains while another uses something else is pure baloney.



              I fail to see your reasoning regarding the original claim? Again, you are confused.

              1. profile image0
                ThomasRydderposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                I'm not confused in the least. Ok...lets change the scenario. One...a person does the same as stated above. The doctorate, the careerr, blah blah. Now...backtrack...that SAME person goes to high school, graduates, and spends the rest of his days serviing in a restaurant....which picture uses more of his brain?

                1. Pcunix profile image92
                  Pcunixposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  I don't know.  The person waiting tables might have to be more agile negotiating around tables and customers while  balancing plates, remembering orders, keeping track of who is likely to be finishing up, and so on.  That could take considerably more brain effort than typing out a white paper.

                  Or consider those strange math savants who contort themselves in seeming agony as they multiply six digit numbers in their heads but don't know how to drive a car.  What is their brain doing?

                  1. profile image0
                    ThomasRydderposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                    you may well be right...I can't argue that point at all. But the argument isn't who uses more...it's whether or not some use theirs more than others. And I absolutely think that some do.

        2. couturepopcafe profile image61
          couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Not necessarily, Thomas.  The high school student may be using as much voltage at his age and level as the grad student is using at his.

  3. barryrutherford profile image78
    barryrutherfordposted 6 years ago

    you can imagine the madness if every part of the brain was activated at once

  4. Greek One profile image73
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    all my neurons are always firing at a 100% clip...

    except when I'm watching a hockey game on TV..

    during which, they are in 'rest mode'.... much like a politician's.

  5. profile image0
    ThomasRydderposted 6 years ago

    oh, and by the way, mikel...don't bother taking pot shots at my self esteem and education. Both are hail and hearty and neither are threatened by your lack of decorum or ability to adhere to the subject at hand. Say something intelligent, or nothing at all..if you please.

  6. couturepopcafe profile image61
    couturepopcafeposted 6 years ago

    When we look at BEAM (brain electrical activity map) scans, we see varying degrees of activity.  BEAMs assess electrical transmissions by measuring the four individual brain waves and brain wave combinations. 

    The first measure of brain health is voltage which determines the brains electrical power.  The second measure is speed recorded in milliseconds.  The third measure is rhythm and the fourth measure is synchrony.

    The brain is able to do what it does through electrical charges but is useless without the neural pathways (neurons, dendrites)that actually transmit information in the form of an electrical current.

    If someone is missing one or more of the four primary biochemicals that make up the brain's code, brain waves suffer.

    So in the case of the achiever vs the underachiever, Beethoven the child vs Mikey the nosepicker, it's simply a matter of brain chemistry.

    Assuming all brain chemistry is in balance, beyond that, we can challenge our brains with tasks that are new to it.  That doesn't mean if you like to cook you should try a new recipe.  It means learning something completely outside our comfort zone.  New pathways will grow over time and the brain will become more efficient.

    The med school student may not be challenging his brain any more than the surfer, the fry cook or the reader.  What matters is the degree to which this is a new challenge to the brain.

    1. couturepopcafe profile image61
      couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Medications, hormones, diet, lifestyle and environment can all effect brain function.

    2. Mikel G Roberts profile image77
      Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Nice.




      yikes ...Mikey the nose-picker??? hmm

      1. couturepopcafe profile image61
        couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Sorry, I didn't mean you.  I guess I meant Cromagnum Man. (sp.?)

        1. Mikel G Roberts profile image77
          Mikel G Robertsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          wink



          I was joking (no offense taken) I simply thought it funny.

 
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