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In the 2012 US presidential election, would you vote for a Muslim?

  1. profile image0
    Chasukposted 5 years ago

    Assume -- her or his faith possibly excepted -- that  this is your perfect candidate in every respect.

    1. Disappearinghead profile image85
      Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Speaking from the other side of the pond with only the BBC and Hubpages forums to go on, I would guess that the atheist and agnostic would consider policies and personnal conduct to be of higher importance, and the that the Christian would believe that it is impossible to have good policies and personnal integrity apart from their interpretation of the bible.

      1. profile image0
        Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Most Christians in the US, at any rate.

    2. twosheds1 profile image59
      twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Of course I would. If it was my ideal candidate, then their faith wouldn't inform their public policy. Kind of like Jimmy Carter. He was born-again, a lay minister, etc. Far more religious than W, but his faith was separate from his office.

      For the record, I am an atheist.

    3. Jeff Berndt profile image88
      Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Is one running?

      1. profile image0
        Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        There are very few Muslim politicians in the US. Keith Ellison is perhaps the most well-known.

        Most of them are probably listed right here:

        http://muslimmedianetwork.com/mmn/?p=3257

        I don't think that we will have a Muslim president in the US for a long time, if ever. I suspect that most of the people on HubPages who would vote for a Muslim president have already responded here. Those who wouldn't are unlikely to respond to the question.

        1. twosheds1 profile image59
          twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Yeah, people generally don't like to admit that they're bigots.

          1. profile image0
            Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Exactly.

    4. mischeviousme profile image58
      mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      At this moment, I can't say. There's this "cease fire" thing and then you never know who's who. I don't mean to sound racist so I am not refering to the many, only the few. In fact, I haven't voted for anyone in a long time. I will however, vote for social issues. I can't stand those greedy b@$%!'s, politicians, any of them at all. They remind me of the Roaman senate...

      1. profile image0
        Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        "cease fire" thing?

    5. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      No.

      Because first of all, the term "Muslim" indicates a basic allegiance to a different Nationality than America. 
      The exception would be if the person's distant heritage was "Muslim", but he AND his parents were natural-born Americans and claimed and showed allegiance to America's Constitution, not some other Nation's.  In which case, however, the person wouldn't really even BE Muslim unless he considered it to be a matter of skin color.  But even in that case, (since you mentioned his/her "faith"), that faith would disqualify them from eligibility since our Constitutional Law is based on belief in, and adherence to, the basics of the Christian Faith and not the "God" of Muslim Nations.

      1. profile image0
        Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        This is my first definitive "no."

        Islam has nothing to do with nationality, by the way, any more than Christianity does. There are devout Muslims who were born in the US, and whose national allegiance is to the US, in exactly the same way that there are devout Jews who were born in the US, and whose national allegiance is to the US, and devout Christians who were born in the US, and whose national allegiance is to the US.

        1. profile image0
          Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Then, if it has nothing to do with Nationality, it must be about the Muslim faith, which is Islam.    Same conclusion.  Not compatible with the American Constitution's fundamental basis.

          I'm sure you've seen by now just how incompatible even a Candidate whose faith straddles the fence between Islam and Christianity has been with our Constitution.  Yeah, I'm talkin' about Obama.  He won't claim either faith definitively, and has vowed even before Election to change our Constitutional foundation.  He should've never been allowed to even enter the White House with that attitude.  Since that person's inability to show allegiance to America's Constitution is obvious, it's even more obvious that a claimer of Islam would be totally ineligible.

          1. profile image0
            Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I'm sorry, you are entitled to your own opinions, but you aren't entitled to your own facts. What you are saying here in factually incorrect.

            Obama has claimed Christianity definitively, and he has made no vow -- before or after his election -- to change our constitutional foundation.

            1. profile image0
              Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this
              1. mikelong profile image74
                mikelongposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Even more ridiculous.....

                Brain drain kool (or kook)-aid strikes again!

              2. profile image0
                Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I am an American citizen and a citizen of the world. The two are not incompatible. A citizen of the world is someone who thinks globally, as the President of the United States is reasonably expected to do.

                In context, Obama's words were:

                "I come to Berlin as so many of my countrymen have come before. Tonight, I speak to you not as a candidate for President, but as a citizen – a proud citizen of the United States, and a fellow citizen of the world."

                Regardless, being a "citizen of the world" does not make you a Muslim, nor does it instill a burning desire to modify founding documents. In other words, your context-free video (now videos) do nothing to address either of your claims.

                Here, however, is a video which does:

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzSe-Zm6 … r_embedded

                1. profile image0
                  Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  You didn't even watch all of the video you yourself posted, did you?!   Much less the ones I posted . Wow.

                  1. profile image0
                    Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Your list of links kept growing, so no, I didn't watch them all. However, I have seen them all, and others like them, including the Alex Jones garbage. In the ridiculous video, "Obama Admits He Is A Muslim," i suppose you didn't notice the quick cutting?

                    The actual quote was, "The United States has been enriched by Muslim Americans. Many other Americans have Muslims in their families or have lived in a Muslim-majority country — I know, because I am one of them."

                    You also closed your mind, so I don't know why I'm bothering to share this link, but here it is, anyway:

                    http://www.factcheck.org/2009/12/truth- … oom-floor/

                  2. twosheds1 profile image59
                    twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Your videos prove nothing. So the fact that Obama eats pork and doesn't fast during Ramadan means nothing? Even the non-religious Muslims I know follow those rules, but Obama, the secret Muslim, is SO secretive about it that he doesn't even follow the most basic rules. Not to mention the fact that he went to a Baptist church for decades! Wow, he must REALLY be undercover, secretly plotting his Muslim agenda to... Uh, what was it again?

            2. twosheds1 profile image59
              twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Don't waste your breath. I've tangled with her before, and she doesn't listen to reason.

              1. profile image0
                Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                What I don't listen to without responding is anti-Americanism and anti-Christianity.   Ergo, my responses.

                1. twosheds1 profile image59
                  twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  You also never answered my very specific questions in your own hub, questions which had nothing to do with "anti-Americanism" or "anti-Christianity."

                  1. profile image0
                    Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Was it the Political Process hub?    What questions did I fail to answer?   You'll have to remind me or I'll have to go look........sorry, but I've slept many times since that discussion.....smile

                2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
                  Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  That's weird, 'cos nobody said anything anti-American or anti-Christian here.

                  In fact, the only one who has said anything anti-anything is you with your anti-Muslim remarks.

                  1. profile image0
                    Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    It is, after all, a thread about the Muslim "faith" as it relates to American politics (which, American politics is fundamentally Christian-based).  I've stuck to the subject. So what's the problem?

            3. profile image0
              Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              You have no right to call me a liar.  The proof of his vow is there in, not just black&white, but in living color, by picture and words.

              And by the way, what agenda is it you're pushing here?  Are you with some Muslim activist group or what?   You've been told what America's eligibility requirements are in order to be a legitimate Candidate for the Office of President, and you should've at least read those facts in our Constitution since you're an American citizen, correct?   It's clear that being an American means trusting in our Constitutional form of Government, not in some other Nationality's form of government, and not in changing the basis of our Government.

              1. profile image0
                Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                You might be a lair, but I didn't call you one. What i said was that you are incorrect.

          2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
            Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            "Then, if it has nothing to do with Nationality, it must be about the Muslim faith, which is Islam.    Same conclusion.  Not compatible with the American Constitution's fundamental basis."

            That right there is conclusive proof that you have no idea what the Constitution is based on.

      2. mikelong profile image74
        mikelongposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        What nonsense...

    6. Jesus was a hippy profile image59
      Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I wouldn't vote for anyone who harbours beliefs that I deem to be ridiculous religious or not.

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If I followed this rule I could never vote.  I just go for a favorable ratio.

        1. Jesus was a hippy profile image59
          Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I know what you mean. The lesser of two evils is often the choice you are left with when it comes to politicians.

          1. psycheskinner profile image80
            psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Indeed, something like 'who can I vote for that isn't actively pursing goals I despise, but who might actually win'.

            1. innersmiff profile image71
              innersmiffposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Democracy - a choice between two cretinous people to rule over you.

              But you know who won't pursue any goal you despise? Yourself!

    7. livelonger profile image87
      livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Of course.

    8. jacharless profile image79
      jacharlessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The sole purpose of the President is to guard, protect, defend and uphold the elements of the Constitution. The constituencies within said document do include the protection and allowance of religious freedom within the constructs of the law. America is a nation of Laws. Always was, always will be. So, the individuals 'faith' or preferred religious practice would be irrelevant.

      James.

      1. Disappearinghead profile image85
        Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Yep that sounds sensible and I'm not even American.

    9. AEvans profile image66
      AEvansposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Personally I don't care what religion or non-religious person runs our Government so long as they are committed to doing the right thing for our Country.

  2. kerryg profile image86
    kerrygposted 5 years ago

    I married a Muslim, so I think I could manage to vote for one, too. lol

    I don't particularly care what religion a politician is as long as he or she doesn't try to make his or her personal religious beliefs into law. There are a few religions I look at a little more askance at on the grounds that they are nuts (Mormons being the most politically active of them at the time), but it would still ultimately come down to the politician's actions and policy plans. I have much more tolerance for Catholics than Mormons in general, but I'd vote for Romney or Huntsman over Santorum any day.

  3. profile image60
    JBunceposted 5 years ago

    I happen to live in the Minnesota district represented in Congress by Keith Ellison, and since I HAVE voted for a Muslim for Congress I certainly would have no problem voting for one for President if they met all my other criteria.

    1. profile image0
      Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Sometimes, I wish that HubPages had a "like" button. :-)

  4. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Yes, I would

  5. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Obama is only Muslim if you think religion is genetic.  nothing he has done in his life indicates any such thing.

    But if he was Muslim, I would still vote for him.

  6. mikelong profile image74
    mikelongposted 5 years ago

    I watched what you posted Brenda.....and it was a load of propagandist garbage...  Weak minded people may fall for it, but that is all....


    It is amazing how people enable themselves to be led astray....

  7. habee profile image90
    habeeposted 5 years ago

    Yes, I'd vote for a Muslim...or a Mormon, a Catholic, an atheist, or a Martian if I thought he or she could be a great POTUS for our nation.

    1. profile image0
      Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I don't know that I'm actually prepared to vote for extraterrestrials, yet. :-)

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I think we've already elected a few...

      2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
        Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        A Martian wouldn't be eligible unless he was a second generation Martian-American, born on American soil.

    2. Repairguy47 profile image59
      Repairguy47posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I don't think a martian can run for President unless he was born in Kenya.

  8. mikelong profile image74
    mikelongposted 5 years ago

    We've definitely had a few space cadets...

  9. mikelong profile image74
    mikelongposted 5 years ago

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCAffMSW … e=youtu.be

    I find it utterly astounding that one can use tripe productions like this to back up a claim.

    While it is incredibly sad that someone can truly watch it and believe it, let alone use it as "evidence" of some type supporting its premise, it is even more sad that money was wasted to create this garbage in the first place.

    The reality is that the kooks who put the production together got paid...and they are laughing away (those who aren't deluded themselves) at the people who believe their lies.

    With every "Obama is a Muslim"..."Obama is un/anti-American"..sign, shirt, or blog/forum post they can point and exclaim, "Look, here is another of our little misguided drones..."

    Don't be a drone...

  10. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Because Obama is a Christian who leans Baptist he is Muslim?  That's some good logic.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      No no.  That wasn't the conclusion I drew nor meant to infer.  I meant the subject of that Baptist Church wasn't even an indicator of Obama's "Christianity".  The fact that Obama went there does nothing to help make the case for him being Christian.

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Going to a Baptist church, going to other Christian churches,  saying he is Christian, and not following any specifically Muslim rules of conduct kind of does.

        All of which is beside the point.  I would vote for him either way.

      2. twosheds1 profile image59
        twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        So if he's not as enthusiastic a Christian as you, he's not a Christian at all? Is being a Christian a prerequisite for being a good person or public official?

  11. girlgonestrong profile image59
    girlgonestrongposted 5 years ago

    I would never vote for a Muslim.  They are encouraged to deceive others into thinking that they area "religion of peace" while they plot violence behind the scenes.  Why would you want someone who comes from a background steeped in such evil thinking to be in charge of anything?  You'd never know if they were sincere or if they were just playing it up so that we would THINK them sincere in order to get into the White House at which point they would change their tune.

    I know that's pretty much the play book of all politicians, but one who might advance Muslim ideals would be like throwing gas on the fire.

    1. profile image0
      Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Wow. I would never vote for a Christian. They are encouraged to deceive others into thinking that they are a "religion of peace" while they plot violence behind the scenes. Why would you want someone who comes from a background steeped in such evil thinking to be in charge of anything? You'd never know if they were sincere or if they were just playing it up so that we would THINK them sincere in order to get into the White House at which point they would change their tune.

      I don't really think that, but you should look at yourself first. Christians have a long history of violence and deceit. Sometime I think a lesson could be learned from Canada. They don't care what religious beliefs someone has as long as it doesn't interfere with politics.

    2. twosheds1 profile image59
      twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Stereotype much? The fact that there are over a billion Muslims around the world, yet only a tiny minority have engaged in violent acts means nothing to you, I guess.

    3. scottcgruber profile image88
      scottcgruberposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      You are a disgusting, hate-filled bigot and I am ashamed to share a planet with you.

      Also, I find it interesting that only atheists and agnostics have denounced your bigoted statement. Why is that?

      1. twosheds1 profile image59
        twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Because we're neutral on the subject of religion. All religions are equally kooky in our eyes. OK, Scientology is on top of the kooky pile, but the others are all pretty equal.

        1. livelonger profile image87
          livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I'm Jewish and don't agree with her at all.

          If you think all religions are pretty much the same, then you probably don't know much about other religions, or you're trying to appear unbiased.

          1. profile image0
            Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Wow, us poor atheists can't do anything right. We stand up against a bigot and we are told we are right, but we are still wrong because we lump all religions together.

            1. livelonger profile image87
              livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Do you lump all religions together?

              I was responding to twosheds1. I don't presume that all atheists have the same beliefs.

              1. Jeff Berndt profile image88
                Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                "I don't presume that all atheists have the same beliefs."
                Well, they all share at least one...smile

              2. profile image0
                Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                We just don't discriminate between them. If you must know I've never meet a muslim I didn't like. I've seen them on TV, but in person they are all nice people. I've meet Christians I didn't like (mostly family). I've never meet a jew I didn't like.

                1. livelonger profile image87
                  livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Yes, a reasonable, decent human can come from any background.

                  Do you view proselytizing religions the same way you view non-proselytizing ones? We're talking about the religions here, not any specific adherent.

                  1. profile image0
                    Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    What a great question. The short answer. I've never meet a person at my door trying to convert me that I liked. I find it despicable that they bring along a child so I won't be rude in front of a child. I usually ask them for there address and tell them I'll drop by at my convenience. The Witnesses are the worst because they don't learn from there own mistakes. There own predictions are always wrong, but they don't learn. Great question.

          2. twosheds1 profile image59
            twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I know plenty about other religions. The Abrahamic religions are essentially the same to me. I know there are differences, but so what? They all worship the same god, they just have a different mythology attached to it.

            But all religions share one thing: they worship non-existent beings.

            1. livelonger profile image87
              livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Like I said, you don't know much about religion at all if you believe that. But you're entitled to not know or care about it if you like.

      2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
        Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        "I find it interesting that only atheists and agnostics have denounced your bigoted statement. Why is that?"

        'Cos I haven't gotten around to it yet. Also, because nothing she said is de-bunk-able: it's all opinion (wrongheaded, irrational, foolish opinion, but opinion nonetheless), and I can't point at anything to say, "you're incorrect because you got this fact wrong."

        She's just hatemongering. That's bad, but less insidious than the hatemongering of those who use fabricated 'facts' to rationalize their hatred.

  12. Mighty Mom profile image90
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    OMG what a brilliant idea.
    What if the US did elect a Muslim POTUS??
    Think what a positive foreign relations statement that would make with those who view us the satanic evil enemy?
    Think what a positive domestic relations statement that would make with bigoted people who view Muslim-Americans as terrorists in training?

    Whoa. It blows my mind what a great idea that is.

  13. Mmargie1966 profile image91
    Mmargie1966posted 5 years ago

    That sure is a tough question.  My first instinct is to say no because I'm a Christian and I fear Muslim take over of my country.  Sharia Law doesn't appeal to me.

    On second thought, if I am in agreement with his or her morals, values, experience, and foreign policies, I would definitely consider it.

    1. twosheds1 profile image59
      twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Do you think there is a fundamental difference between Sharia law and Christianity-based law? Isn't it two sides of the same coin?

      1. profile image0
        Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Sharia law is more like Europe in the middle ages.

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image88
          Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          So, very Christian. smile

          1. profile image0
            Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I'm not christian and Iran is still stoning people for adultery. Sounds like Europe a few hundred years ago to me.

            1. profile image0
              Chasukposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Fundamentalist Islam is indeed like Christianity of yore.

              1. Jeff Berndt profile image88
                Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Chas gets it.

        2. twosheds1 profile image59
          twosheds1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          But if you took the OT literally, it wouldn't be much different. There'd be stonings for just about everything. Basing a legal system solely on the Koran is no different than basing it on a literal interpretation of the Bible.

          1. profile image0
            Rad Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            That's why I related it to the middle ages in europe. If you even spoke out against the church you could be charged with blasphemy and put to death. Iran and some of the other middle eastern country are just a few hundred years behind.

  14. Mighty Mom profile image90
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    A simple thought occurred to me reading through these posts.

    If the US was founded as a Christian nation, why do we even need the Consitution?
    I mean, isn't every guideline about right and wrong and how to conduct ourselves according to God's wishes (e.g., laws) already written in the Bible?

    It had not occurred to me until just now, reading some of the "respectble" opinions proffered, that our Constitution is redundant at best, and
    useless to the functioning of a truly Christian nation at worst.

    Everything I ever needed to know is in King James, baby!
    lol

    1. jdflom profile image74
      jdflomposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      We need the constitution because we aren't a Christian Nation. You know... the part about religious freedom and separation of church and state; it's in there somewhere...

      1. Mighty Mom profile image90
        Mighty Momposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        What!??
        Separation of church and state is in the Bible?
        lol

        1. jdflom profile image74
          jdflomposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Uhm... I never said that. I am talking about the constitution.

          1. Mighty Mom profile image90
            Mighty Momposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I know you are.
            smile
            I'm just messing around.
            smile

 
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