Willfully choosing to be homeless for a time, any tips/additions?

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  1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
    Kyler J Falkposted 13 months ago

    I'm willfully choosing to go live on the streets for an unspecified amount of time, and I'm wondering if any of you have some tips, or some wisdom about doing so? Surviving outside of an urban environment is rough, but pretty simple when you're away from the scrutinizing eyes of the law and citizenry. I'm needing to understand firsthand what it is like to be homeless in an urban environment.

    What I'm bringing in my rucksack aside from what I'm wearing:
    Tactical knife (1)
    Change of casual clothes (2)
    Change of socks (4)
    Pair of hiking shoes (1)
    Blanket (1)
    Pocket Knife (1)
    Canteen (1)
    Emergency Rations (7)
    Inhaler (2)
    Lighter fluid (1)
    Lighter (1)
    Self defense weapon/multitool (1)
    Identification papers/wallet (1)
    Winter cover [Jacket (1)]
    Tooth brush (4)
    Transport scooter w/strap (1)
    Cowboy hat w/bandana (1)
    Washable masks (6)
    Black billed beanie (1)
    Torch/light (1)

    Rule is that this is a bugout situation, and I cannot prepare outside of what I can grab and throw in a rucksack on the fly from the average household. There is no timeframe for how long I will be out, but I plan to go for as long as I can before I feel I am on the verge of breaking. So far, hygiene is said to be the biggest concern due to not having sufficient access to personal care products.

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image75
      Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      I do not think you will break until it gets cold.
      Then, you will see what its like to be homeless. or homefully displaced. At first, the experience will probably be quite enjoyable, since you are sober and have your wits about you.

      Also, I really do not see why the homeless have to poop on any street, in any public place. Couldn't you just carry doggy-poop bags? You would then wrap them up and throw them away when you came across a trash can.

      1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
        Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

        That was my thought, as well, the cold would be a big factor in how fast I break. Luckily it is California, and it is the perfect time for an extended outdoor excursion.

        As for pooping, my idea was that I would stick to the coast and use the public restrooms and showers. There's plenty of wealthy neighborhoods and communes alike that offer the opportunity for gainful interaction up and down the coast. Going to make my way onto PCH via Main St. in Huntington, then head North from there.

    2. Castlepaloma profile image73
      Castlepalomaposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      I have built tiny houses for homelessness in the pass. It has been very difficult getting through all the red tape of legislation and mental illness from too many being out in the street physically for too long. I understand if there was no other way out. For covid has lowered everyone standards and depopulation agenda is going on. lifestyle for the wealthy just keep getting richer.

      Don't get comfortable being street homeless because it will cut your life expectancy in half exspeically in California big city streets. The crime, rape and health condition is hell on earth below third or fourth world countries.

      Research eco villages and volunteer any way possible of any skills you may have to offer. If you can afford a car, it's better to live in one of these,and use it to go to work.

      1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
        Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

        I'm going to keep away from the larger homeless colonies, and stick to the coast. Having grown up on the beach I spent a lot of time with beach bums, but also having worked with local communities I know the more inland you go, the seedier everything gets. I was thinking I'd keep an eye out for communes/cults along the way, maybe take up a role within one if things get too rough on my journey. We'll see which way the wind blows.

        1. Castlepaloma profile image73
          Castlepalomaposted 12 months agoin reply to this

          the beach sounds much healthier, maybe build a sand castle to raise money. lol

          1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
            Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

            I actually did think about using this as a way to build an online personality centered around bringing awareness to the homeless situation, but I think that would only taint my perspective. I'd be going from an authentic experience to a performative one, but we'll see. I always make totems on my survival runs in the woods/desert, so I'll probably find something interesting on the beach to build.

            1. Castlepaloma profile image73
              Castlepalomaposted 12 months agoin reply to this

              I BUILT SANDCASTLES on every continent for 45 years. It all started on the beach IN SOUTHERN CALIFORINA . Trained a women to WHO WON 4 sand sculptor World championships.
              GO FOR IT!!!

              1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
                Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

                Come do it with me, you can teach me to sand-sculpt and build micro-eco-communities. I really do need a good rundown on long-term survival architecture and engineering.

                1. Castlepaloma profile image73
                  Castlepalomaposted 12 months agoin reply to this

                  love it in NOVA SCOTIA building tiny houses urban farming. It would have to be online help.

                  1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
                    Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

                    Nova Scotia looks like a really nice place to be, might want to make a trip up there at some point just to visit, and see what life is like. Gotta learn from the grand master how to build me some long-term homesteads.

    3. bravewarrior profile image91
      bravewarriorposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Kyler, are you taking your son with you?

      1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
        Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

        Hell no, lol!

  2. Jodah profile image89
    Jodahposted 13 months ago

    Kyler, I can’t give you any tips other than maybe add deodorant and insect repellent. It will be an interesting experiment though, and I wish you the best. I look forward to reading your report on the experience when it is over.

    1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
      Kyler J Falkposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Is insect repellent a standard household item? The only people who ever regularly had some on hand were my grandparents. I'm debating on whether or not to add deoderant and sunscreen, because I feel like in a bugout situation it wouldn't cross my mind. With 5-7 minutes to load up and head out, I'm not sure I'd naturally go for those two things, except maybe the sunscreen since I have some in my go-bag already.

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image75
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    ... shorts, sandals and Hawaiian shirt. You never know when you might meet a cute girl who wants to take you to lunch or a concert. Also wheels and a cellphone so you can watch Bob Wells videos ...  also a way to make money ... like, have things for trade or barter, such as crystals, arrow heads or stones: turquoise and lapis lazuli. Also, a small book you can record your journey: drawings, writings, observations and thoughts.
    You need to be interesting to others ... if you are interesting, communicative and helpful to others, they will be the same to you.

    One Fall, in the seventies, I took a bike ride up the coast of CA from LA to SF and then to Oregon. I took the train from SF to Oakland. (and the train to Oregon after that.) I always ran into people who would help me whenever I needed help. It was very fun. The ten-speed bike gave me the most trouble. I remember swearing at it a lot. I would sleep under bushes right off the road (in-between campgrounds) with a tarp over me. You might need a tarp. I had a sleeping bag: A down sleeping bag which rolled up into a very tight roll. Which I carried on my back. I learned that the bike should have held most of the weight. But it basically, it was all on my back, but I was in good shape. I made it to my destination in about two weeks time, traveling about 40 miles a day when on the bike. I stayed with my friends in Oregon for awhile, but discovered it was more fun to be alone. I left Oregon after about two months. Traveling back down the coast to LA was a fun ride, as it seemed down-hill!  But, it was it was getting cold, especially at night.

    Do it before the last week of November!

    1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
      Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      That's one thing I actually don't have on-hand, and something I've noticed most people don't actually have: some sort of bed roll and tent.

      I actually do have tents, but my privileged life has led me to only have blow up beds with portable pumps. I was going to make due with a blanket, but keep my eye out for a tarp, and other coverings. Can't decide whether or not a tent is something most people just have on-hand, because I didn't have one in my home when I was young, and so far the majority I speak to do not have tents.

  4. Brenda Arledge profile image81
    Brenda Arledgeposted 13 months ago

    Kyler
    Ya might want a rain coat, the kind that fild into a pouch. You are in California, so hopefully the weather won't be cold.
    There should be a place where they offer to let you sit & relax, watch tv for a bit...do a free load of laundry.
    There might be places to eat a free meal too.  Local churches & other places do that each night of the week here.
    Ask around on the street or call a local church to see if they have any information.
    Don't trust everyone you meet.
    Maybe a notebook & pen, unless you are taking your phone.
    Some hotels offer a weekly rate to homeless if you come across any cash...it might help you out for a bit.
    Community Action here also has vouchers for hotels for a nite, two, or week...nothing grand, but a bed.

    Oh...maybe a roll of toilet paper or kleenexes.
    Those hiking boots are gonna be heavy, but I get it.
    Take bandaids, little packets of alcohol wipes, and antibiotic onitment.
    Lightweight fleece blanket that folds up to tiny.
    Matches & toothpicks.

    Stop at a library & keep us posted once in awhile.

    Take care of yourself.

    1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
      Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      It will surely be interesting to experience the varying levels of generosity there are in society, and it's one of my main interests in doing this. As I get dirtier, hairier, smellier, less appealing, I want to see just how things shift. Perhaps I'll be pleasantly surprised, or maybe I'll be forced to stay out in the cold.

      Going to take a hot minute to really get into the thick of things, but the thick of things is what I need to understand to get a real grasp on the situation.

  5. Misbah786 profile image87
    Misbah786posted 12 months ago

    That sounds so interesting, Kyler. Seems like you want to jump out of your comfort zone to learn something new. I agree with Brenda don't trust everyone.

    "Success is the result of foresight and resolution, foresight depends upon deep thinking and planning, and the most important factor of planning is to keep your secrets to yourself."  -- By  Imam Ali

    Your thread reminded me of this conversation I had with you: https://hubpages.com/literature/forum/3 … iful-quote

    I am glad to know you are finally going out of your comfort zone. I wish and pray may this experience brings out the best in you.

    “It’s only after you’ve stepped outside your comfort zone that you begin to change, grow, and transform.” ― Roy T. Bennett.
    I hope now the quote will pierce your heart to its core.

    Best wishes
    Blessings as always!!

    1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
      Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      More like jumping into a zone I enjoy and am more comfortable with than conventional life, that's the main reason I'm choosing to do it. I love going out in the middle of nowhere to do this, but now I want to do it in a lawful urban zone to see what it is like. It'll be uncomfortable, but definitely not out of my comfort zone.

      1. Misbah786 profile image87
        Misbah786posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        You'll never agree. Lol! When you return, please tell us about your experience. Maybe you'll agree then.
        Blessings and Best wishes to you!!

        1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
          Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

          Doubt it. Learning is comfort.

          1. Misbah786 profile image87
            Misbah786posted 12 months agoin reply to this

            Learning provides comfort when achieved through an uncomfortable zone. The aim should be to introduce unpredictability into your life in order to keep your brain learning. Stability can be comforting, but science has shown that it teaches you very little.

            1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
              Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

              Sounds like a personal coping mechanism to me, rather than a universal truth for everyone. We'll see; struggle typically isn't out of my comfort zone, but if you want me to struggle and suffer to a point that detriment somehow brings about progress, I'll do my best just for you. I'll dedicate a poem to you, and commit my heart to wallowing in the suffering of it all just for the poetry in it.

              1. Misbah786 profile image87
                Misbah786posted 12 months agoin reply to this

                Lol!!

  6. Readmikenow profile image94
    Readmikenowposted 12 months ago

    Interesting that you are going to attempt such a thing.  I know a writer from a city newspaper who had done such a thing.  There have been books and documentaries done on it.  If I was ever left homeless, I would do whatever it took to get away from the city and into a wooded environment.  I have enough survival skills I could build a shelter, get food and water.  Those are the only three things you need to survive, food, water and shelter.  I've had some interesting experiences trying to teach others these survival skills.  Young girls, are the ones who seem to work the hardest to learn these skills for some reason. 

    I hope your experience is free of harm and provides you with the knowledge and understanding you seek.

    1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
      Kyler J Falkposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      If it weren't for wanting to experience homelessness in an urban environment, I'd absolutely be heading out to the nearest valley forest as well. Having played this out in my mind, the law seems to be the biggest concern for finding and utilizing resources. Like others said in the thread already, though, there's plenty of churches and shelters to utilize; the only rule against that I have is that I can do no pre-research on locations other than packing a map and a compass.

      Should be an interesting experience.

 
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