Ok--here's a puzzle for you.

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  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
    DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years ago

    This may not be "fun" as it represents a math problem.  I suck at math.  This is not a game, though; I actually want to find out the answer.

    My husband says it will require algebra.  If so, I'm done for. LOL
    (By the way--this is in USA measurements--not metric.)

    Ready?  Here goes:

    If it takes 3 scoops of rice to fill a 2-cup measure, how much does the scoop itself hold?

    Thanks in advance to anyone who can solve this problem for me! smile

    1. profile image0
      calculus-geometryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      The scoop holds 2/3 of a cup.  You can check it: 3 times 2/3 of a cup equals 2 cups.

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
        DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Thank you, calculus-geometry.  I didn't even know where to begin with addition, subtraction or division, or what. 
        I had a really, really bad year with math in 4th grade--right when we were supposed to be learning this type of thing--with a teacher who terrified me...so I didn't learn any of it.
        Given that I am also more of a wordsmith than a mathematical mind anyway, that meant double-trouble.  wink

        1. profile image0
          calculus-geometryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Your mathematical intuition is probably better than you think.  smile

    2. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      DZY!!  C'mon, girlfriend.....I thought you were my friend!?   Math?  Really?   I have your answer, Dzy.  Just throw the damned SCOOP away and use the CUP, in the first place, to scoop your rice.  Better yet substitute a potato for the rice!!  I'm sure your husband won't mind.
      Any more problems?  Feel free to check with me!

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
        DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        LOL, fpherj48--
          Yeah, I know, right? Every so often, my brain goes wandering off unsupervised.....

    3. anatomynotes profile image97
      anatomynotesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      if 3 scoops holds 2 cups
      then x scoops holds 1 cup

      x = (3 scoops multiplied by 1 cup) divided by 2 scoops
      x = 1.5 scoops

      so now we know 1.5 scoops hold 1 cup
      therefore 1 scoop holds y cups

      y = (1 cup times 1 scoop) divided by 1.5 scoops
      y = 0.67 cup (this is two-thirds of a cup)
      (now that you have the answer in cups, you can convert 'cups'  to another unit if you want)

      Here is your answer: the scoop itself is two-thirds of a cup.
      If you were wondering, the method I used is called cross-multiplication.

      1. Phyllis Doyle profile image96
        Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        What?  I knew the answer was the same as you came up with, yet I just figured it out quickly with logic. hmmm ... I guess I figured it out by your method anatomynotes without even thinking about it. I am just not good at writing down the calculations.  smile

        1. anatomynotes profile image97
          anatomynotesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          I believe you Phyllis Doyle smile

  2. Martin Heeremans profile image73
    Martin Heeremansposted 4 years ago

    According to Wikipedia a cup is u.s standards equals 8 fluid ounces.

    To work out the math it is done using a division.

    If one cup equals 8 fluid ounces then that's a total of 16 fluid ounces for 2 cups.

    To work out the individual measurement per scoop we divide the total by the amount of scoops.

    That's 16/3 which works out to be 5.3 (recurring) fluid ounces per single scoop.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks--but the issue was volume, not fluid ounces.  I was measuring rice, not liquids.  wink

  3. JRScarbrough profile image90
    JRScarbroughposted 4 years ago

    It’s a linear equation. Calculus provided the answer.

    The way it looks on paper:

    3 * x = 2

    As you can see, the answer is easier to intuit using the rules of algebra.

    You want to isolate the unknown variable by getting all your known numbers to one side.

    To do that, you simply do the opposite. If adding, you subtract. Multiplying, divide.

    x = 2/3 is the solution because you can’t arrive at a whole number as an answer. You simply look at the equal sign as a type of fulcrum. Just grab the 3 and swing it over behind the two and reverse whatever you were doing in the original equation. Here, we change * to / and your problem is solved.

    I always had a hard time with mean teachers too. My kindergarten teacher got fired for scratching me out of anger and I never liked school afterwards. I feel your pain there. Teachers can either make a child love education or cower from it. That’s why they should be thoroughly ensured to actually like children.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      LOL, JRScarbrough...
      "...easier to intuit using the rules of algebra..."  Uh...thanks...but I did not grasp algebra.  I tried taking it as a mid-life college student, and in spite of becoming well-known in the learning center; monopolizing the professor's office hours and hiring a private tutor, I flunked the class anyway.  (And that was a "gentle" class in the "Women in Transition" program...the prof was a sweetheart!)  I just don't have a math brain.  Algebra seems merely arbitrary to me..I am apparently incapable of grasping the concept.

      1. JRScarbrough profile image90
        JRScarbroughposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Lol! I completely understand. If I had not had a brief occasion to actually think I could accomplish computer science studies, I would mostly be at a loss myself. I went through algebra and trigonometry and entered into the higher maths and then blew a gasket and have been an artist ever since. tongue

        It ended up that I was more gifted in language than I had first been advised. Math is simply not my thing at all. I just have some of it still burning a hole in my brain. tongue

  4. Shyron E Shenko profile image81
    Shyron E Shenkoposted 4 years ago

    3/4 cups each. that is a guess my friend. I passed the math exam by guessing (that I am good at) every question.

  5. Shyron E Shenko profile image81
    Shyron E Shenkoposted 4 years ago

    3/4 cups each. that is a guess my friend. I passed the math exam by guessing (that I am good at) every question.

  6. Mark Lees profile image81
    Mark Leesposted 4 years ago

    157.7254906666667 cubic centimetres of rice, achieved without algebra.

    Working:
    1 US cup = 236.588236 cubic centimetres. Times this figure by two and divide the result by three gives you the answer.

    If you are looking for weight it will be an estimate as different types of rice have different weights.

  7. Gypsy Rose Lee profile image85
    Gypsy Rose Leeposted 4 years ago

    Math and I were never friends in school. Forget the measures. I have two standards for rice. 1 cup of rice - two cups of water or bouillon, 2 cups of rice - 4 cups of water or bouillon. That's it I never do more with rice. Oh yes, rice comes out better if you make it in a skillet adding spices, turmeric and a touch of cooking oil.

  8. The Examiner-1 profile image72
    The Examiner-1posted 4 years ago

    DzyMsLizzy,
    I was not great at math but my guess is 10.66 to 10.67 oz. per scoop. I hope that this helps some.

  9. The Examiner-1 profile image72
    The Examiner-1posted 4 years ago

    I answered too quickly before. I meant half of that, 5.33 to 5.34 oz.

    1. JRScarbrough profile image90
      JRScarbroughposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I think she was looking for just general approximation using algebra for the volume and in terms of cups and scoops.

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
        DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Actually, I was looking for a solution without using algebra...  wink

        1. JRScarbrough profile image90
          JRScarbroughposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          What do you call someone who hates algebra? An algebraist? IDK. tongue

          1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
            DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            An algephobe?  wink

            1. The Examiner-1 profile image72
              The Examiner-1posted 4 years agoin reply to this

              That would be more like a 'fear' of it. How about an 'anti-algebrist'?

  10. The Examiner-1 profile image72
    The Examiner-1posted 4 years ago

    Actually that is what I did.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      wink

 
working

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