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What the hell is this world coming to???

  1. dohn121 profile image83
    dohn121posted 8 years ago

    I just found this in Yahoo News:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090828/ap_ … girl_found

    I hope he burns in hell!

    1. fierycj profile image78
      fierycjposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Gawd! Now I'm all messed up. Just dont bring me anywhere guys like that. Honest.

  2. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    Read my hub on how we fix this “little problem”

    http://hubpages.com/hub/Jaycee-Lee-Dugard-Outrage

  3. Ms Chievous profile image81
    Ms Chievousposted 8 years ago

    Can you imagine being that deputy who did NOT enter the home three years ago?  This is a sad stroy and even sadder is it is probably just the tip of the iceberg.  there is a lot of bad out there we don't see

    1. dohn121 profile image83
      dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Were that my daughter...I can't even talk right now.

    2. Sasha S profile image73
      Sasha Sposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thet - to me - is an incerdibly interesting point. Think of all the people who, having now realised what was going on in that man's (If one can really consider him human) garden, must now feel an immense guilt as to what they could have prevented had they looked more closely at his life and his house. Sure, none of them are at all to blame for anything, however, that will not necessarily stop them from thinking that they could have ended it long ago - but didn't....

  4. Ms Chievous profile image81
    Ms Chievousposted 8 years ago

    I hear ya!  I don't rememeber a reaction from the paretns in the article.. i will have to go back and look

    1. dohn121 profile image83
      dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      ...You're back to your ole smiley face again.  That does cheer me up a little smile  Oh, and please do.

      1. Ms Chievous profile image81
        Ms Chievousposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Nope nothing on parents yet.. bu the dude had a parole officer. that apparently didn't do his job

        I'm havin a good week so far big_smile

    2. lrohner profile image82
      lrohnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Her Mom and Stepdad evidently divorced over this while she was missing, as the Stepdad was the main suspect until the day this creep was caught.

      1. dohn121 profile image83
        dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Geez, this just keeps on getting worse!

  5. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    It would take an awful lot of judges and a police force or two to keep me from ….

    Damn I can’t even decide the most brutal way to eliminate the bastard that harmed one of my kids.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Castration. End of problem.

  6. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    Edit: Dohn121 Hey thanks for joining up, but we gotta keep up the rage, dont calm down about this! Too many kids, It makes me physically ill thinking of it. I Have already petitioned my congressman about changing the sentencing guidelines.

    sorry can't type in a rage.

    1. dohn121 profile image83
      dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Dude, I'm about to crack some heads...Did you read Grisham's, "A Time To Kill"?  I'll join you on that petition.  Pedophiles need to roast.

      1. megs78 profile image60
        megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I read it, watched the movie and  have never been able to forget it.  My rage is black and ugly! having children myself I find it difficult to swallow just thinking about the horrors our children have to endure in this perverted world.  It's terrifying.

        1. dohn121 profile image83
          dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I'm a bit better today compared to yesterday when I was seeing red (literally).  I now know why some people freak out and do nutty things in the name of revenge...I couldn't forgive myself as a parent if my son or daughter suffered the same fate.

          1. profile image0
            Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Perfect case(s) in point.

  7. profile image0
    Louidam1posted 8 years ago

    That guy needs to get the death sentence for what he did. This is so sad but I am glad that she was found.  I really hope that pervert didn't rape her daughters as well.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe the death sentence would be appropriate - if they'd actually ever execute anyone . . .

      1. profile image0
        Louidam1posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I doubt he will get executed but he do deserve to be in jail for life so he will never hurt another little girl again.

  8. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    Edit: Thats just for starters, but it does not get that vile, evil, #$*&% out of their brains. Only one solution for that.

    Still too mad to type

  9. Ms Chievous profile image81
    Ms Chievousposted 8 years ago

    Most likely he will go to jail.. and that would be the worst thing for him because even prisoners don't like pedophiles...

  10. profile image0
    Crazdwriterposted 8 years ago

    That is horrible. If that was my daughter I would defintely kick some you know what not caring if I got arrested for it. Then immortalize him in a book in the most slow gruesome horryfing death imaginatble And when he does go to prison, make sure the cell mates know what he is and what he had done.

  11. Luciendasky profile image73
    Luciendaskyposted 8 years ago

    it is so sad and I hope that the girl gets the help she needs to get back into society.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      That is the worst part. What kind of life is this poor girl going to have now? I'm sure a better one now that she's free but dealing with the past isn't going to be easy, to put it mildly.

      1. dohn121 profile image83
        dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        If she was kidnapped at age of eleven and has been imprisoned for nearly the last 20 years, that would make her in her early 30's.  She won't nearly be as worse off than her kids sad

      2. ledefensetech profile image72
        ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        You'd be surprised at what people, especially kids can live through.  I did read a few case histories worse than this one, not many mind you, but a few.  What surprised me was how well these kids did after. 

        She'll have issues, that's for sure.  To get an idea read Rodney Sickmann's book on his hostage ordeal in Iran.  He recounted that after he came home, he'd have odd flashes back to his captivity.  One time he ordered this dish they served him in Iran all the time without realizing it.  It affected him pretty seriously.

        Ironically, some of the therapies they use for PTSD might make it harder for her to adjust to a normal life.  There's more and more evidence to suggest that constantly going over the issues that cause PTSD might in fact make the effects worse, not better.  Current thinking goes something like this:  The mind associates a certain event with the fight or flight trigger.  So much so that even if a situation is slightly similar to the one that triggered PTSD, the person will have an attack, usually of panic.  Time does seem to attenuate the attacks, but not always.  There has been some success in using drugs that inhibit the fear response.  It would seem that going over the event and blocking the flight response causes the brain to "overwrite" the traumatic event and a subject is no longer susceptible to panic attacks.

  12. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    I am so tired of hearing or reading about another kid that’s been taken or killed. Seems to happen here in Florida about once a month. This type of insanity has got to be eliminated from our society.
    Not locked up or hidden away.

    E L I M I N A T E D….. 

    Can ya tell I’m a little miffed?

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      If the penalty was horrible enough it might be.

  13. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    Yes I know...But its a hot button issue for me

  14. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    Luciendasky Thanks for commenting on the Hub

  15. blue dog profile image73
    blue dogposted 8 years ago

    "... and dropped off several documents containing rambling passages about religion, sexual compulsion and mind control."

    there's a part of the problem.

  16. Lisa HW profile image80
    Lisa HWposted 8 years ago

    The day after it made the news the step-father was on, and at 60 years old, he said had remained a suspect until "one day ago" (or words similar to that).

    Now, today, there's talk about people being murdered on that property.  Apparently, bone fragments have been found.

    Not that they're all as extreme as this freak was, but if you have a sex offender registry in your area it's sobering to see how many people are on it, even in a small-ish town.  Then if you look for cities with a population of, say, 150,000; it's really shocking.   This is why mothers and fathers today watch their children as closely as they do.  At least this sub-human freak didn't murder this particular victim (Jaycee).

    1. goodfriendiam profile image55
      goodfriendiamposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Who are you to judge?

      1. tksensei profile image60
        tksenseiposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Who does she need to be?

        1. Lisa HW profile image80
          Lisa HWposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I'm not sure exactly what's apparently offensive about judging a subhuman freak who kidnaps a child and makes her go through God-knows-what for 18 years; but I think it's only sane and reasonable to think I have a right to judge that kind of twisted, sick, criminal.  That's all I'm judging.  If there's something else you think I'm "judging", and you find whatever that "judging" is offensive, I think you may have misinterpreted something I said.  (If it was "I think.....didn't murder...." that seems like "judging", my only point was that at least this young woman still has a chance to be reunited with her family and maybe have a shot a normal existence.  A lot of these other sex-offender freaks kill their victims.)

          I don't judge people who have different religious, political, or other views from me; and I don't judge people who dress in a way that I don't happen to think is my taste.  There's a difference between that kind of "judging" and feeling free (and right) to judge someone who victimizes other people, especially children.  If some moron has some freak-ish urges it's his business; but if he doesn't get help in controlling them, and if he lets them rob a little girl and her family of 18 years of normal life (not to mention the other sick, twisted, stuff and the little girls born under that situation) - then people are going to judge.

  17. profile image0
    Ghost32posted 8 years ago

    The previous posts on this thread have well covered the (thoroughly justified) outrage factor. 

    One thing we seem to be missing, however, is the awesome resilience shown by the victim.  My first reaction when the news broke was not to cast my evil eye toward Mr. Badbar--there are plenty of others to do that--but to salute the young lady who could pop up like a flower in the desert after a monsoon storm. 

    You go, girl.

  18. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 8 years ago

    I just hope the young lady and her children get all the love and support they need for the rest of their lives. So sad.

  19. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 8 years ago

    The outrage is understandable but it's actually part of the problem. People tend to overreact to sexual abuse stories, especially extreme cases like this one where someone young is held against her will. But it's worth remembering that some version of this story--whether it be immigrants held in massage parlors or girls raped by their stepdads (or dads) or boys molested by a scout leader--some version of that is VERY common. One out of every two girls and one out of every three boys will experience some from of sexual abuse before they become adults, and most NEVER talk about it. Why not? Because people go ape sh@t over it.

    If adults don't act like adults, who will?

    I feel like as a society we wink at this crap, then every so often when something extreme happens there's a lot of chest thumping and nothing really changes. sad

  20. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 8 years ago

    Also, in many cultures this man's behavior would be considered 'normal'.

    I'm not saying I approve, I'm just saying, keep it in perspective.

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Which cultures would those be?

      1. tksensei profile image60
        tksenseiposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        ..........................

        1. profile image0
          pgrundyposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Our culture, for starters. In Victorian times it was all the rage for wealthy, respectable upper class men to pay good money to deflower barely pubescent girls. Until recently, grown men could and did marry girls as young as 13 legally in some states. Underage prostitution is still a hot business and most people look the other way--I guess they think 12 and 13 year olds are volunteering because McDonald's isn't taking applications.

          We only get outraged every month or so when something really freaky like this hits the news--the rest of the time, most people don't even want to think about it. It's total emotional masturbation. Face it. People don't really care, they just like to act outraged and offended.

          1. profile image0
            Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Speak for yourself.

            1. readytoescape profile image60
              readytoescapeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              I CARE

          2. tksensei profile image60
            tksenseiposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Maybe you've been too busy to notice but we are not in Victorian times. Even then this would have been recognized as a horrible crime.

    2. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree Pam, the outrage although understandable serves no useful purpose.

      1. profile image0
        Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I completely disagree. If you don't have a HEALTHY sense of outrage at outrageous acts, they will never be put down.

        1. Lisa HW profile image80
          Lisa HWposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I know what Pam's saying; but I think the fact that some cultures haven't "evolved" out of such ignorance and lack of respect for other human beings highlights the degree of violence and ignorance that still exists in this world, rather than putting this one moron's crimes into perspective.  We can be grateful, I suppose, that we live where such acts are considered unthinkable, unpardonable, crimes.

          I do think outrage serves a purpose, even if outrage shown on something like this forum won't get to the eyes of this particular victim.  A couple of the worst things for victims of abuse and other crime (aside from the victimization, itself) is not to have other people know it's happening/it happened, not to acknowledge it, and - especially - not be outraged by it.  To have people make excuses for the criminal or else not seem to realize the degree of his/her crime can leave the victim (who has been robbed of the life s/he would have had, and maybe the person s/he would have/could have been) feeling as if, not only can there be no true justice, but there is not even adequate acknowledgment.  For some victims just getting that acknowledgment can help with some version of "closure" and help them to move on (rather than feeling, "nobody knows even now".

          This particular victim may never see all the expressions of public outrage that are "out there", but other victims will.  Not all victims of abuse, mistreatment, or being "imprisoned" by someone are in such bizarre/dramatic circumstances as Jaycee; but there are a lot of them.  Some of them will read someone's words of outrage.  Also, some of them don't even know that what is happening to them is wrong.  Seeing the outrage on behalf of someone else may help them see that others know what they're going through is wrong too.

          1. profile image0
            Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Yes. Well put.

  21. Lisa HW profile image80
    Lisa HWposted 8 years ago

    I don't underestimate the sexual abuse aspect of this horrible crime; but, to me, the thing that has brought up the biggest reaction (at least for me) almost isn't that.  It's robbing this little girl of the life she should have had, as a child with her own family and (hopefully) a normal, loving, family.    Again, without playing down the sex abuse aspect of it; I see that part of it as almost as giant crime within a giant crime.  The victim wasn't just victimized by a sex nutcase/freak.  She was completely removed from her own life, future, and world on top of the rest of it.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, exactly. This scumbag is entitled to only his life (such as it is) not hers. What he took from her can never be returned to her.

    2. profile image0
      pgrundyposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I know what you are saying. I'm not saying it's cool or anything, I just think that the way the press wallows in a sensational case like this doesn't really raise awareness or help in any specific way. In fact it creates a climate that actually perpetuates abuse and muddles all the issues surrounding it. Abuse is actually common, not rare.

      The man who did this is clearly disturbed. Not much will change as a result of this case. Some people will get to express moral outrage, the guy will get in some kind of trouble, the girl will have to have a truckload of therapy, and weird guys--many of them relatives and friends of the victims--will go right on having sex with kids.

      Just getting outraged changes nothing, improves nothing.

      1. profile image0
        Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Again, I disagree. When people hear about something this horrible it makes them feel outrage. Not to acknowledge their feelings to themselves would be a form of mental illness. And there are people, who, when confronted with such outrage, take action and change things all because they were motivated by something they felt to be so wrong.

        Outrage, and rage, has a very important place in human interactions. And lots of times when someone knows that anger is going to come down on them they refrain from further wrongdoing.

  22. Jane@CM profile image58
    Jane@CMposted 8 years ago

    I thought there were 3 woman found, not just one. 

    It is sickening, outrageous & scary!!!

    1. Lisa HW profile image80
      Lisa HWposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      There was the 29-year-old young woman (victim kidnapped at 11), and her two daughters (the oldest is 15 and the other is a couple/few years younger).  Their father is mental-case/freak/criminal.

  23. Lisa HW profile image80
    Lisa HWposted 8 years ago

    Just one other thought before I leave this thread (because, when it comes down to it, it's too disturbing to "dwell on")...

    Once we have children of our own we usually see the world in a different way.  When something like this happens it's easy to think of our own children, imagining something like that happening, and becoming sick and outraged just to think about it.  Without wanting to see like we (the strangers who have heard this news story) are trying to "borrow" the disturbing emotions only the principles of the case can know, we "other people/strangers" have had our own emotional response to this crime.  Expressing our outrage serves a purpose for us too, just because in our own, insignificant, way we need to vent and "verbally let this moron have it" (and also somehow express our support for the victim).

  24. profile image0
    Madame Xposted 8 years ago

    " . . . and also somehow express our support for the victim."

    Yes, that says it. Thank you Lisa, for saying so well what I couldn't.

  25. profile image0
    ralwusposted 8 years ago

    He and his wife should be locked away with a 500lb sex starved gorilla for 18 years

  26. mayhmong profile image67
    mayhmongposted 8 years ago

    I agree with ralwus.

    After hearing that news, I immediately looked it up online. I was in rage from the fact that the girls could've been rescued if only they didn't let that horrible guy back out?!

    I even read about the first kidnapped and rape of the 25 year old women back in the 70's. When she was discovered, the police officer told her to go back in the storage room where the raped had taken place to get dress. Then he lets that sex offender guy go back in there with her?! He lied to the cop that she was his girlfriend or whatever. In there she begged her to play along. She ran back out (probably half dress) and told cops she was kidnapped.

    Imagine this, a police officer can be certified like a nail technician for a 2 semester course of 300 hours. But I heard that it takes time before they patrol on their own. Hmm....

    1. dohn121 profile image83
      dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Hello, May!  Obviously, this is not a happy-go-lucky place for pleasantries, but it's good to see you!  You too, cosette!

  27. profile image0
    cosetteposted 8 years ago

    http://i30.tinypic.com/68bll1.jpg

    Damaged by Plumb

    we should be outraged. what's the opposite - apathy - one step from acceptance as far as I am concerned.

    1. profile image0
      pgrundyposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      The opposite of outrage is not apathy, it is rational understanding of the issue and support of measures that keep kids safer and keep known pedophiles and perverts under closer control. We all need education of both adults AND kids on the issues--and kids really need calm adults that they can come to when there is a problem. Kids need to know that the problem will be handled with some sensitivity and in a mature way, instead of with a bunch of outrage and hysteria. Kids know adults will melt down and go crazy if abuse is disclosed to them. It's not a good thing.

      Outrage is a selfish, self-satisfying response. It makes the outraged person feel like they are doing something when really all they are doing is making noise. It isn't really very helpful to the victims.

      1. readytoescape profile image60
        readytoescapeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Okay I can’t stand it any longer,

        THERE IS NO RATIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF RAPING KILLING OR TAKING OF A CHILD.
        Period, sorry I think I had to yell.

        Please read my hub, http://hubpages.com/hub/Jaycee-Lee-Dugard-Outrage

        This is what we all need to work towards, there is no rehabilitating of a pedophile, rapist murderer of this type. There is only one solution for predators of our children.

        ELIMINATION>

        There would be no victims if we eliminate the reprobates.

        Pgrundy this is not directed at you personally, just where I i thought a response was required.

      2. profile image0
        Madame Xposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        There aren't any kids here now. No one ever said that they would respond this way to a child if approached on this subject. Actually, I think every adult here, if a child came to them with this kind of thing, would be calm, supportive and as helpful as could be.

        And then they'd go out and kill the f**ker!

  28. tksensei profile image60
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    The death penalty should be applied and quickly.

  29. profile image0
    annvansposted 8 years ago

    Seeing all of this stuff on the news lately makes me wonder what the heck is going on.  Do we not have enough law enforcement or what????????  There is so much stuff going on now that I cant even begin to understand.

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      There is never enough, but now we have a lot more media coverage.

  30. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 8 years ago

    Sorry if I offended anyone trying to defend this &%#hole or any other position of excuse.

    But Tuff  S&#t this is indefensible.

  31. sparksdaniel2000 profile image69
    sparksdaniel2000posted 8 years ago

    a lot of sadness in the world today...prayer and meditation people.

 
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