Masterchef Contestant Accused of Plagiarism

Jump to Last Post 1-3 of 3 discussions (21 posts)
  1. CYong74 profile image96
    CYong74posted 11 months ago

    Just want to share this news. Because plagiarism affects too many of us, and because this involves my birth city.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl … riter.html

    If she's indeed guilty, have to say, I'm stunned the publisher didn't detect it. Or maybe it's the assumption that a famous person has no need or reason to copy.

    1. bravewarrior profile image91
      bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Shame on her! Stealing and printing someone else's recipes and memories is beyond reprehensible. If Mrs. Haigh was a respected chef, I'm sure she isn't any longer. Why would she think she could get away with theft? And why would she feel the need to steal? Is she a complete fraud?

    2. Miebakagh57 profile image70
      Miebakagh57posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Obviously, the lack of imagination will make a person to copy other people work.                                                And it's shameful that a famous chef will venture into such obnoxious tract.

  2. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
    PaulGoodman67posted 11 months ago

    I don't know what happened in this case, but I think a lot of successful people nowadays see themselves as too busy to write their own stuff and instead have ghostwriters.

    That's not meant as an excuse for her, the buck definitely stops with her, but I've seen this style of plagiarism happen a lot recently.

    Even some of the influencers and bloggers seem to use ghostwriters nowadays. It's kind of sad.

    It's too easy for a lazy person to either:

    1. Pay someone else to write stuff for them

    2. Copy and paste, take the money and run

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image88
      Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Yes. Plagiarism happens. I have researched this area. There are precedented cases. The publisher is responsible. They need to check all sources to ensure the author's (or ghostwriter's) work is genuine — not plagiarised — before publication. We can point our finger at the author, but how do we know the author wrote it?

      1. Kyler J Falk profile image89
        Kyler J Falkposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        "I didn't know I was committing a crime, I just profited from it," usually doesn't blow over any better than accepting you messed up somewhere outright.

        1. Kenna McHugh profile image88
          Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          I hear you, and yes, she plagiarized. But the publisher should have checked before publication. There are software programs that do it.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image70
            Miebakagh57posted 11 months agoin reply to this

            In other words, ghost writers uses AI devices or softwares. Both the machine and the ghoswriters lack intelligence and imagination. It's not a pity. But deliberately shameful.

    2. Miebakagh57 profile image70
      Miebakagh57posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Paul, that's awful.

      1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
        PaulGoodman67posted 11 months agoin reply to this

        I think that the modern world is greedy for "content" and people are tempted to cut corners.

        1. Miebakagh57 profile image70
          Miebakagh57posted 11 months agoin reply to this

          I agree. Any person that has pass out of English class can write a 500 word read on "content."                                           But by asking another person to "do it for me", one is being lazy and proscrinating. That's the same thing as spinning another person's original content  on a software.                                      Seriously, a person who fail English class but is determine to make it freelanclng can write 1000 word read, pass it through online grammar checker, and make correction. I wouldn't pity those who plagiarized when catch. Shame on them.

  3. CYong74 profile image96
    CYong74posted 11 months ago

    I think what's more distressing than an established publisher making such a mistake, are the comments left on the news articles.

    According to some people, plagiarism is rampant in the recipe publication business, online or offline.

    You take someone's creation, change the words, and it's your own secret discovery. Refined after years of trying.

    You take someone's recipe for beef stew, add in an irrelevant ingredient, and suddenly it's your grandma's prized creation. Perfected when she was on the run from Nazis.

    Etc.

    Is that true? I neither cook nor write that much for Delishably. But this sounds horrible to me.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image88
      Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      I think it's true. How many ways can you make enchiladas? Grill cheese sandwich? Pancakes?

      1. CYong74 profile image96
        CYong74posted 11 months agoin reply to this

        True. And copycats could always argue, their addition of cyanide made the recipe a brand-new killer.

        1. Miebakagh57 profile image70
          Miebakagh57posted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Ah ha! Very terrific! I can't imagine that.

    2. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
      PaulGoodman67posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      To be honest, I often wondered how people did "new" recipes for basic meals. I guess it's all in the "stories" that go with them?

      There was a time on HP when recipes were all the rage and did really well. Every man and his dog seemed to be writing them apart from me.

      Then they kind of crashed and never fully recovered their former glory.

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image88
        Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        Recipe articles are like "How to Get Rid of Ants." There are only so many ways. Besides, the Internet is full of similar articles. If I were to write recipes, I'd write about one topic, cooking for kids or an army.

        1. CYong74 profile image96
          CYong74posted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Just read from the Washington Post coverage of this incident, that UK and US copyright laws do not cover recipes. They are considered "factual."

          Err .... Hmm.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image70
            Miebakagh57posted 11 months agoin reply to this

            So that gave recipe addicts a sort of license to plagiarized other cooks recipes?                                     I kind of rarely written recipes. The last one yet to be  publish...a long read will increase libido.

            1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
              PaulGoodman67posted 11 months agoin reply to this

              It always amazes me how much clutter people can create to fill out a page that has just a basic recipe.

              I understand why writers (have to) do it: my online experience knows it's for SEO purposes. But it's a pain in the arse, especially if you're on your phone and have to scroll through all that fluff just to get some basic info like the baking temperature.

          2. psycheskinner profile image82
            psycheskinnerposted 11 months agoin reply to this

            Copyright does not apply to the list of ingredients, by instructions beyond the most remedial and certainly any attached anecdotes are covered.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)