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jump to last post 1-19 of 19 discussions (19 posts)

Should we blame Single Mums for Child Obesity?

  1. Lady_E profile image74
    Lady_Eposted 7 years ago

    Should we blame Single Mums for Child Obesity?

    Society seems to be putting the blame on them.

  2. Lady_E profile image74
    Lady_Eposted 7 years ago

    Sorry, I meant to write "Working Mums" but Hubpages doesn't give the option to edit or close questions posted.

  3. wychic profile image89
    wychicposted 7 years ago

    Ah, okay, working moms makes more sense smile. I'm guessing that the reason that's a theory is that working moms are more likely to serve up pre-packaged or ready-to-eat food than to prepare a "good wholesome home-cooked meal." Frankly, I say no, they're not to blame.

    Society as a whole has gotten way too used to huge portion sizes of very unhealthy food, and many parents simply feed their kids the way they were raised. Others mistakenly believe that healthy food is too expensive for them. Some don't know how to cook, so they're more likely to buy preservative-filled ready-made stuff. Getting away from food, some parents are very lenient about the time spent in sedentary pursuits (i.e. video games and the internet), while others don't live in areas where it's safe to let their kids go run crazy outside. I could go on and on listing various childhood obesity factors, but the long and short of it is that there are many many different factors that transcend race, gender, socio-economic status, family structure etc., and to try to blame any one factor or group of people is, I believe, very incorrect.

  4. PR Morgan profile image60
    PR Morganposted 7 years ago

    I think any parent should feel responsible for an obese child.  A parent should set the parameters for healthy eating for a child.  The only reason I would not blame the parent is if the obesity is due to other health factors beyond their control.

  5. AustralianNappies profile image77
    AustralianNappiesposted 7 years ago

    No. Whether a parent works or not there's no excuse for not having their child in a sports program of some sort of a weekend or after hours or in school.

  6. profile image57
    rieomposted 7 years ago

    Working moms do takeout or fast food at least one to two times a week.  This is because they have it all (not really) and rfin themselves in a postion that forces them to work full-time while raising a family.

  7. Enigmatic Me profile image74
    Enigmatic Meposted 7 years ago

    This is a serious question??
    The answer is No. Serious answer.

    How many single parent children do you think are out there??

    There is a LACK of Education...with the question as well as the realities in the US. Portion sizes since the turn of the 19th century have grown exponentially (meaning over and over and over), the actual size of the food has as well. Being educated on the need for physical activity and healthy menus should curb obesity. However, it needs to be GOVERNMENT Sanctioned. Meaning, the government needs to step in with legislation prohibiting supersized portions. People should be able to live by the motto"Everything in moderation"but we don't. Individuals need help with this. Thus why it should be the government to govern this.


    For instance the USA pushes Denny's and IHOP and all those buffet styled restaurants so hard that parents (single or not) who are not making much money (which is quite a few families when you look at the poverty level in the US) have little choice when it comes to 'treating your family".

    My folks went to Florida in 2001. They ended up at Denny's 3 times in 8 days. Did they over eat. No. They were responsible with what they ate. However, sitting next to them was a family (mom,dad and son).The son was less then 3 yrs old. The mom went and piled 3 plates,all equally filled, and placed them in front of the three of them. The little boy could not fit in a high chair,nor did his clothing allow for much movement. He was expected to finish his plate  like his parents had.   The Mother berated (yelled and screamed) at this child because he would be wasting their money if he didn't finish his plate??? Child abuse?Neglect?

    The perception of what is cheap is good needs to go out the window. Food producers need to make raw product more accessible and affordable. Again an area where the government could come in.And there needs to be more education for parents and children about the negative impacts of over eating,not exercising, and only eating take out.   

    But to seriously blame a single mom for All the Obesity in the US....that's just ridiculous.

  8. ChristineVianello profile image61
    ChristineVianelloposted 7 years ago

    Sometime on Maury he shows obese children with there mothers who want them to be big. I seen a mother who gave her little boy pounds and pounds of McDonalds! It was insane to watch. Some children are obese from there genetics, and they eat very well.

  9. biman_r profile image75
    biman_rposted 7 years ago

    I don't think its their fault sometimes its just caused due to genetic reasons also so there is no way we can just blame or hold a working mother accountable for something like this.

  10. SheZoe profile image60
    SheZoeposted 7 years ago

    no, we should put the blame on all the synthetic "food" we eat now. the poorest of us are forced to feed their families what is essentially a hodge podge of unhealthy chemicals, additives, preservatives, fats and sugars with little or no nutritional value. healthy food costs more. takes longer to prepare and working moms don't have several hours to spend making dinner. they are tired, overworked, and doing their best. i blame the food production industries yikes)

  11. profile image0
    ellie.wposted 7 years ago

    Definitely not.  There are way too many obese people in the US to be blaming it on one demographic group!  Like others have said, I think general parenting, portion size, poor education, and lack of physical activity all contribute more.  What ever happened to kids running around in the neighborhood, playing tag, riding bikes, and playing sports?

  12. Monisajda profile image74
    Monisajdaposted 7 years ago

    I don't think single moms should be blamed at all. They usually do the best they can in given circumstances. I blame the ignorance of people who don't know what damage fatty sugary fried foods do to your body. I know that when you are working there is no time to cook and prep the food but there are less healthy and more healthy snacks still.

  13. Celiegirl profile image70
    Celiegirlposted 7 years ago

    Well, who else is too blame? Barring genetic /medical problems, what else is there? We as parents influence what our children eat the majority of their lives starting when they are babies!
    We purchase the groceries and introduce them to the foods that they choose to eat.
    Single mother, working mother, any mother or parent has to take responsibility, as a caring parent. We make the decision, not the child about their health, and the risks that come with eating the wrong foods.
    We introduce them to activities or push them into sports that round them out as individuals, but it also makes them healthy.
    We make the choices for them first, then give them the freedom to make their own choices! It takes discipline - i know i have been there!

  14. platinumOwl4 profile image76
    platinumOwl4posted 7 years ago

    This is an extremely complicated question. On the one hand it is easy to blame the mom. On the other hand food companies market quick meals that are not  healthy. These meals are made available at a price that is enticing to a single mom with limited resources.Therefore, prior pointing a finger multiple variables should receive in depth exploration.

  15. KAYKAYKAYLA profile image37
    KAYKAYKAYLAposted 7 years ago

    I wouldn't blame just single moms it's really not their fault. I would say that families really don't have the time to sit down and actually have a real meal more often. Because of the way that things are now where mothers have to go out and get jobs so her family of four can survie. So, that being said its just easier to drive through the burger king or have a pizza dropped off. Single mothers aren't to blame our economy is, thats just my opinion.

  16. profile image51
    Angel1778blsposted 7 years ago

    No. they do what they can. we can't help it if children get out of hand sometimes.

  17. DaveysRecipeRead profile image61
    DaveysRecipeReadposted 7 years ago

    Most fat kids have 2 parents, a mom and a dad who aren't paying attention to their kids weight (because they often don't pay attention to their own weight). There's usually less money for junk food available to the kid being raised by a sole parent, more expectation on the kid from the sole parent (that rules are followed, for example) and lots more responsibility than expected of kids with stay at home moms.
    There are lots of real Gilbert Grapes in the world and like Johnny Depp they aren't fat.
    Also lots of todays pre-packaged foods are made without the eggs, cream and/or butter and fats that are otherwise used in homes across the world by mums who cook. They are actually less fat.

  18. nightwork4 profile image62
    nightwork4posted 7 years ago

    i've never heard that before. i know families that have obese kids that have both moms and dads .

  19. joshhunt83 profile image59
    joshhunt83posted 7 years ago

    I don't think you can simply blame single mums. Western culture creates this mass consuming ideal, that is surely more to blame.

 
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