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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (10 posts)

What are some of the alternatives to spanking?

  1. alexandriaruthk profile image75
    alexandriaruthkposted 5 years ago

    What are some of the alternatives to spanking?

    A state passed a law banning spanking. Some parents use spanking as a way to discipline their children, while others disagree to it as a form of discipline. What do you think? What are some effective ways of disciplining a child aside from spanking?

  2. MickS profile image71
    MickSposted 5 years ago

    The birch, cane, or slipper, all save your hand stinging.

    1. lone77star profile image83
      lone77starposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      And love and communication take entirely too much time for any parent to bother with. Shouldn't such measures be rare and a last resort against a recalcitrant attitude?

    2. Mom Kat profile image78
      Mom Katposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Where the heck have you been hiding?!  Good to see you back!

  3. lone77star profile image83
    lone77starposted 5 years ago

    Communication is the best approach. That and love.

    Sit your child down and talk to them. Explain why their behavior is wrong or bad. And tell them that they can't watch TV for a day, week or month. (Actually, TV will rot their mind, unless it's PBS science or such.)

    Too many parents use violence (spanking) as a substitute for responsibility and communication. Some parents don't want to take the time to become involved with their children. Spanking, whipping, and other violence is a substitute, but not a very good one.

    My wife is great with children who are misbehaving. She communicates with love and they calm down within minutes. Me? I still get impatient and raise my voice. Not a very good example, but I'm learning.

  4. Mom Kat profile image78
    Mom Katposted 5 years ago

    I just wrote a hub on this a couple of weeks ago:
    http://momkat.hubpages.com/hub/Should-I … en-He-Hits

    There's no way for me to condense a decent answer into the word limit of the answer section smile

    1. profile image0
      Deb Welchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I read your Hub Link above - good advice - however - it could be a bit much for little kids.  Useful information. Thanks.

  5. profile image0
    Deb Welchposted 5 years ago

    Time-out, take away privileges,write me a page of why or tell me why you did or said that or acted out,apologize,chores as punishment,ask the kid what he/she thinks their punishment should be, and if it's really bad - all of the above.  I was always spanked or worse as a child - I had spanked my child, too, but not so hard it hurt for an hour later and I incorporated all the ideas I have mentioned and they worked.  Some parents are so stressed out today and if they have a holy terror on constant mode - it could be easy to lose it and spank.

  6. danajconnelly profile image69
    danajconnellyposted 5 years ago

    As an educator my training offers many workable alternatives. But as a parent I have been guilty with giving a single slap on the hand but only when my son has done something that crosses the line such as being dangerous or destructive. Not sure if its my Itailian Queens NY up bringing but an occasional tap on the back of the head has occured  in a "where is your brain" sort of way. Spanking has a level of acceptance to a certain point and unfortunately an angry frustrated parent can take things way too far.  Its imoprtant to model more composure and patience when your child has upset you.  This teaches them to not resort to physicality when they are frustrated.

  7. Dr Pran Rangan profile image85
    Dr Pran Ranganposted 5 years ago

    It is true that spanking is still common to teach discipline in so many households. It is practiced even by many educated parents. To discipline a child, in the first place tell him or her about what wrong he or she has done. Explain in very clear language why the particular act is wrong or risky. But speak to kids affectionately while explaining. If we scold them while explaining, they will not understand why it is wrong. They will get an impression that we scold them because we don't like the particular act done by them. They may do the same behind our back or in our absence. We should teach them lovingly what we want to teach them.

    Children so many times need to be told repeatedly about certain things but we should not lose our patience. Scolding may at times be resorted if their mistake is really serious. We should avoid spanking at any cost.

 
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