What are the 10 cruelest things a parent can say to a late talking child?

Jump to Last Post 1-5 of 5 discussions (9 posts)
  1. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago

    What are the 10 cruelest things a parent can say to a late talking child?

    Yes, there are parents out there who strongly believe that children should start talking anywhere from 5 months to a year at most. Some even go further they strongly contend that the earlier a child can talk, the more intelligent he/she is. It is their contention that their children are amiss if they are not talking by 1 years of age. They believe that late talking children reflect poorly on THEM and that their child is.......well, inferior.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/8483820_f260.jpg

  2. victoria1800 profile image79
    victoria1800posted 4 years ago

    All children develop differently. I have three boys, my oldest spoke at 8 months old while my younger two were late talkers. I believe the younger two didn't speak as early because their older Brother did all the speaking for them.
    I think the worse thing parents could say to a child who is a late talker is to call them stupid or get angry at them. Children will talk when they are ready too.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      What you have said is SO true. I knew a child who talked at 1 then stopped talking because her parents talked for her.She resumed talking at 2.5 years. Her father considered her to be stupid, saying thus because she was a late talker.

  3. DDE profile image24
    DDEposted 4 years ago

    A child in this case can be called a stupid,
    Good for nothing,
    Useless,
    There is no hope for you
    Idiot
    You don't know anything
    A born mistake
    I don't love you anymore
    You are not as good as the other child

    1. DDE profile image24
      DDEposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Most parents who feel this way about their children are  less educated or don't feel for their children even when they are not the same as others. They tend to compare their children with others and don't love equally

    2. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Of course such parents are less or the least educated. They do not have the cognizance to realize that EACH child is different. That is why highly educated parents make the BEST parents.

  4. tsadjatko profile image62
    tsadjatkoposted 4 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/8515714_f260.jpg

    Einstein's speech was delayed until age five! As a child, Einstein seldom spoke. When he did, he spoke very slowly - indeed, he tried out entire sentences in his head (or muttered them under his breath) until he got them right before he spoke aloud. According to accounts, Einstein did this until he was nine years old. Einstein's parents were fearful that he was retarded - of course, their fear was completely unfounded! One interesting anecdote, told by Otto Neugebauer, a historian of science, goes like this:
        As he was a late talker, his parents were worried. At last, at the supper table one night, he broke his silence to say, "The soup is too hot."
        Greatly relieved, his parents asked why he had never said a word before.
        Albert replied, "Because up to now everything was in order."
    In his book, Thomas Sowell noted that besides Einstein, many brilliant people developed speech relatively late in childhood. He called this condition The Einstein Syndrome.
    One of my daughter's never said a word until age three. When she finally did speak she spoke in complete sentences, never the usual baby talk - today she is a very successful adult.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank dear Tsaj, great answer and the book, THE EINSTEIN SYNDROME, should be required reading for every parent, particularly parents of late speaking children.  Thank you for stopping by and responding!

  5. peachpurple profile image83
    peachpurpleposted 4 years ago

    when my son did not start to talk until age 3.5 years old, family members, aunties, uncles, cousins, grandparents said that my son has autism, problematic child, should see doctor.

    We as parents were saddened by their words. We never gave up though. We still speak to our child even though he does not answer us. He began to talk when we mimic his talking manners. He talked.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)