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jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (14 posts)

If my order is incorrect, is it wrong to go back and ask for it to be corrected?

  1. jaydawg808 profile image90
    jaydawg808posted 4 years ago

    If my order is incorrect, is it wrong to go back and ask for it to be corrected?

    Sometimes I feel that they will do something to my food, which is why I don't do this very often. What do you think?

  2. Attikos profile image78
    Attikosposted 4 years ago

    If there's something wrong with your food, call over the waiter and tell him. If the restaurant declines to satisfy you, then leave a reasonable amount on the table to cover anything you already have eaten, not what you haven't, get up, walk out, and go to a better establishment. There is no reason to put up with poor service or poor quality.

    1. etower036 profile image60
      etower036posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      When I have a problem in an establishment usually I ask to see a manager. If the manager refuses to fix the problem since you had not ate any food, you do not have to pay. Its their loss for poor management. Try contacting the owner of the business.

    2. Attikos profile image78
      Attikosposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It's not my job to go to a lot of trouble to fix a restaurant's problems, nor do I like to make scenes. I just want a good meal. If the waiter, the restaurant's contact for me, can't solve the problem, I merely take my business elsewhere.

  3. etower036 profile image60
    etower036posted 4 years ago

    It is within all customer's rights to return an item even if it is at a fast food place when the order is done wrong. You are paying for an item and it is reasonable to expect that those items be made to a quality that you are paying and expect.
    I know one time I was at McD's and I ordered the big mac. I asked for no onion. when I got it, the burger was half cooked onions on it, and it was disgusting. I took it back to the manager and said I need a new one. She looked at it, and said that she would correct it. waiting a couple minutes she came back with the same burger i had gave her because I had cut it in half like I always do with my burgers and it was unwrapped so obviously it was the same burger but she just nuked it.  I refused to accept that and I said "Give me a new burger." She gave me attitude saying that it would be a waste of resources for her to give me a new burger when she "corrected" the problem by nuking it. The general manager was there and I told him what had happened and he reached over, grabbed two big macs, and a fresh large fry because he knew my other fries would be cold by the time I returned to my table. And then he gave me a gift certificate worth 15.00 for future free food. I heard he fired that manager.
    So long story short (too late) Stand up for your rights, you are the customer, and you pay for their service. 
    We Pay their wages so in actuality we are their boss. ...

    1. jaydawg808 profile image90
      jaydawg808posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      No, this is great!  This enlightens me to fight for my rights as a consumer.  I should not feel bad for demanding excellent customer service.

  4. profile image0
    Larry Wallposted 4 years ago

    If an order incorrect, be it a fast food restaurant, fancy restaurant, internet order, pickup at department store, etc. the customer always has the right to have the mistake corrected.
    The key, I have found is not to put the person you are dealing with in a confrontational situation. Explain the situation and ask that it be corrected. If not corrected, ask one more time. If that does not work go over their head to the next level of authority. I have done this with restaurants, department stores and even AT&T (that takes a little more effort) but I usually get most things resolved.

    However, it helps to be gracious and to thank the individual for correcting the error or mistake. There will always be someone that will give you grief, but most of the time, this approach will work.

  5. delaneyworld profile image80
    delaneyworldposted 4 years ago

    You absolutely have the right to ask for a proper correction. The key (which has always worked for me) is to be polite and kind.  It is best to stick with "I" words such as, "Excuse me, I ordered X and received Y. I would be very grateful if you could help me."  Avoid placing blame on anyone.  Lastly, let them know exactly what you would like to rectify the situation, "If possible, could I get an alternate steak cooked well-done?"  If dinner is almost over or your companions are done eating, "Would it be possible to receive two free desserts rather than this entrée?"

    Polite and kind helps you avoid any "sneezers", "I" words make it clear you are not placing blame and being direct about what you would like takes the decision out of their hands and hopefully guides them in exactly how they can make you a satisfied customer.

    The goal of any business should be not only to satisfy their clientele, but to create customers that will return AND recommend their business to friends and family.  If you find yourself in a situation where these tips are not effective, your money will be better spent elsewhere.  Good luck and know that you deserve to receive precisely what you have selected with good service.  smile

  6. Claudia Tello profile image77
    Claudia Telloposted 4 years ago

    If you ask for it to be changed in a polite way (only because they made a mistake there is no need to be rude) then it shouldn´t trigger any negative reactions. In the best win-win scenario, a client who is paying for food should leave the restaurant satisfied, that is the only way it will have success in the long run.
    I once was asked if everything was of my liking at a fancy upscale restaurant and I told the waiter the mango chutney in my shrimp dish was too sweet, more like mango marmalade than a mango chutney. He immediately offered to change the dish even though I had already eaten half of it! I was completely surprised and obviously pleased by his kind offer and accepted it. A few minutes later I was enjoying a much better dish and left completely satisfied and happy. I wish this was the attitude of al restaurants....

  7. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 4 years ago

    I don't think it's wrong to ask for it to be corrected but I do cringe in these situations because I'm a lady and people assume that you are the B-word no matter how nice or tactful you are about it. I am a non confrontational person especially in these types of situations because the problem is likely a one time issue or mistake so I don't ever get rude or mean with the staff. Actually, I am often overly nice as THEY are handling my food. However, I have witnessed it on several occasions that in these situations men are assumed to be assertive, women are degraded for asking for what they asked for in the first place. If they can't get it right the second time (I've never had that happen), I would leave and never return.

  8. old albion profile image71
    old albionposted 4 years ago

    Of course you are correct in wanting your food changed. It is not what you asked for and you will be expected to pay for it. Ask nicely and in a proper manner after all it's only a mistake.
    Should there be resistance to your request then speak clearly and loudly. Ask for the manager and be sure other diners hear you. My view is that you need to cause them to be embarrassed. This does the trick for me, it should do the trick for you.
    Graham.

  9. Dvd Zermeno Perez profile image89
    Dvd Zermeno Perezposted 4 years ago

    If you're paying for a service, in this case food, you have your right to demand a quality service, if they don't keep that customer service at the top level, it would be better to never come back at that place.
    Customer service and quality of the food is everything in the food business, if they can't keep it up, that means that they're a bad restaurant.

  10. WhatToCook profile image72
    WhatToCookposted 4 years ago

    No I don't feel it is, There a business and you payed for a service. If you food is wrong take it back, but don't be rude with it, just tell them whats wrong and how you like it fixed. smile say thank you and all of that.

  11. Penny G profile image71
    Penny Gposted 3 years ago

    It is fine, you should get what you pay for. Many nice places will make some type of adjustment as a token of sorry and so you will come back.

 
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