In your culture, what’s the difference between breakfast, lunch, supper, and din

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  1. ngureco profile image81
    ngurecoposted 4 years ago

    In your culture, what’s the difference between breakfast, lunch, supper, and dinner?

    At what time of the day is each meal taken?

  2. mio cid profile image59
    mio cidposted 4 years ago

    In my culture usually we don't eat breakfast as adults,we drink mate,and children usually have milk with coffee or chocolate.Our main meal is lunch at about 1:00 pm in the afternoon  at about 5 or 6 pm mate again with some sort of bread, biscuit , or pastry, and dinner anywhere between 9 to 11 pm.Although these customs have been changing due to a sort of americanisation of the schedules of people they are still prevalent.

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Good. I get the impression you are from South America. And I believe that “supper”, in what you have described, is the mate with some sort of bread, biscuit, or pastry you take at about 5 or 6 pm.

    2. mio cid profile image59
      mio cidposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      i guess you're right ,that would be supper.

  3. profile image0
    sheilamyersposted 4 years ago

    Where I live in Pennsylvania, breakfast is the morning meal (I eat when I first get to work in the morning), lunch is the afternoon meal (my lunch break is at 11am), and dinner is the evening meal (usually around 4pm for me). In other areas of the country, people use the word "dinner" instead of "lunch" and "supper" instead of "dinner". There are also other combinations and different people eat at different times.

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Sheilamyers. So, we can safely say in Pennsylvania you have three meals in a day - that is: breakfast, lunch and dinner.  It seems dinner is the same as supper?

    2. profile image0
      sheilamyersposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      You're welcome. Yes, dinner and supper are the same thing.

  4. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
    DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years ago

    Here in the USA, we generally have breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    Breakfast is eaten upon arising, and may be any number of foods, depending upon personal and regional preferences.

    Lunch is the midday meal, and is most often sandwiches, but it could be a hot meal.

    Dinner is the final meal of the day, and is usually the heaviest in both protein content and quantity.

    That said, there are regional differences.  What I have described applies to the West Coast; California and how far inland, I'm not sure.  I do know, because of relatives and many visits, that the East Coast, the New England states, have slightly different habits and terms.

    The breakfast definition remains the same, but the next two meals differ as follows:

    Dinner is what the midday is called, rather than lunch, and is the heavier meal.
    Supper is the final meal of the day, and is more likely to be light, such as sandwiches..almost more of a 'snack.'

    However, a New England aunt of mine used to say, "We don't have breakfast lunch and dinner; (or supper)  we just have meals."  ;-)

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hi DzyMsLizzy.  According to your description, W/Coast  including California has three meals - breakfast, lunch and dinner. People love to have a meal of snacks, such as cheese and crackers served at between 4 P.M. – 6 P.M.? What do you call it?

    2. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Not to be a smart-alec, but we simply call such a selection a snack.  That would not be considered a meal.

  5. liesl5858 profile image89
    liesl5858posted 4 years ago

    In my culture, I am from the Philippines by the way, we also eat three times a day. We eat breakfast, lunch and supper. The difference is we eat rice three times with our meals a day. The reason been, most of us work in the farm which is back breaking that's why we need the energy that rice gives us in order to be able to do our work in the farm or garden. Nowadays, I noticed that sometimes we have bread in the morning with coffee, then later on about 9 or 10 o'clock am we then eat proper breakfast which contains rice and meat or vegetables. Here in England where I live at the moment, we also have breakfast which is made up of bread and butter with marmalade, coffee or tea, or full English breakfast, then lunch and then supper. But we eat most of potatoes instead of rice. I still eat rice here and my husband will eat potatoes with meat or vegetables of course.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I love rice; but I also love variety.  I would get so sick of rice 3 times a day that I would no longer like it.  sad

    2. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, liesl5858. It seems in Philippines you do not differentiate between supper and dinner or the word “dinner” is not in your dictionary.

  6. Penny G profile image69
    Penny Gposted 4 years ago

    I live in the Midwest USA and grew up in a lower middle class family. Breakfast was whenever you got up, lunch was usually something cold such as a sandwich, chips, fruit or snack cake, if we were lucky. Supper seemed to be the word used for the evening meal. Our more well to do family and friends called supper, dinner. It always puzzled me.

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Penny G, thank you for your observations. So, in Midwest USA, supper = dinner, and it’s a heavy meal?

    2. Penny G profile image69
      Penny Gposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes it is the "BIG meal of the day. I guess it started years back when the DADDYs worked out of the home more than MOMMYs and there was a big meal on the table. Even though things have changed many of us still carry on with this.

  7. The Examiner-1 profile image71
    The Examiner-1posted 4 years ago

    I agree with MsLizzy except for one point. I have 3 meals - breakfast (8 AM), lunch (around 1 PM) and supper (5 - 6 PM). I eat them in the kitchen.

    Dinner I had always felt was eaten in the dining room as a more formal meal (such as when you had a special family occasion or guests).

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hello, the Examiner-1. There are very many hours between 5 P.M and the time you go to bed (11 P.M).  It’s like you are forfeiting the dinner.

    2. The Examiner-1 profile image71
      The Examiner-1posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Where did you get 11 PM? I did not mention that time. I said 1:00 PM for lunch. Dinner sometimes replaces supper whenever it is used.

  8. Ann1Az2 profile image66
    Ann1Az2posted 4 years ago

    Breakfast is the most important meal of the day and should be eaten in the morning, usually between 7 and 9. It gives your body energy to keep going throughout the morning. Unfortunately, many people skip breakfast which may explain why they get sluggish during the day and why energy drinks are being sold right and left in America. Lunch is usually eaten around 12 to 1 pm and should be a fairly light meal. A large, heavy meal such as steak and potatoes in the middle of the day will make a person sleepy and have less energy throughout the afternoon. Supper and dinner are pretty much the same thing in America - it just depends on what part of America you live in. In the South, dinner is served or eaten around 6 or 7. Some people eat even later than that. I've know people who eat around 8 or 9 pm. It's unhealthy, though to eat a heavy meal right before bedtime. In this case, a light dinner would be better. When I lived in Nebraska, dinner was called supper.

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Ann1Az2. I am just curious to know if there are some regions of US where “dinner” refers to the noon meal and “supper” to refers the evening meal?

    2. Ann1Az2 profile image66
      Ann1Az2posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, I believe in Texas, the sometimes call lunch dinner, especially if it refers to a large meal, like a holiday meal or something similar. Dinner is usually served a little later, though, like around 2 or 3.

    3. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Ha! Any explanation why they deviated from the rest of the country? - Maybe it’s too hot there in the late afternoons to cook a big meal they can call dinner

    4. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes--as I explained in my original answer--in New England, "dinner" is at noon, and "supper" in the evening.

  9. Zelkiiro profile image94
    Zelkiiroposted 4 years ago

    Breakfast: Whatever you eat before 11:00 AM.
    Lunch: Whatever you eat between 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM.
    Dinner: Whatever you eat after 1:00 PM.
    Supper: Whatever you eat when you're a savage who doesn't use the proper term. >sad

  10. ShivaniBharadwaj profile image61
    ShivaniBharadwajposted 4 years ago

    Breakfast- what we eat in morning,the very first meal of the day
    Lunch- at mid day
    Supper- 5-6 pm
    Dinner- last meal of the day

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Shivani,
      So we can say, according to Indian traditions, supper is not interchangeable with dinner, and that dinner is the main and the last meal of the day.

  11. Kathleen Cochran profile image81
    Kathleen Cochranposted 4 years ago

    In the south I grew up in, dinner was the Sunday mid-day meal and the main meal on a holiday.  Today whenever my family gets together it's for a family dinner.  My husband's grandmother often referred to the mid-day meal as dinner.  She was the original "steel magnolia" from Savannah.

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Kathleen. Can we safely say that dinner in the South (of US?) is not an everyday meal but a heavy and a main meal taken on special days? All other days is traditionally three- meals-a-day of breakfast, lunch and supper.

  12. erorantes profile image55
    erorantesposted 4 years ago

    Some people eat before they go to work or school. If the    school is far away from their home. They have breakfast no later than 5:00 AM. The majority of people take lunch at 12:AM.  At  5:pm , it is dinner time.

    1. ngureco profile image81
      ngurecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hello, Erorantes. Thank you for your input. I believe the dinner you take at 5 pm is also being referred to as supper since there seems not to be any other meal after dinner.

  13. peachpurple profile image81
    peachpurpleposted 4 years ago

    eat breakfast-heavy, skip lunch, eat dinner-huge!

    1. The Examiner-1 profile image71
      The Examiner-1posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      That sounds like what they tell you on one of those diets.

  14. tom yam profile image61
    tom yamposted 4 years ago

    Here in Thailand it seems like people are eating all the time. I'm not kidding. They may eat 5 or 6 times a day. But,to be honest,they are not proper meals. The Thais like to eat snacks or "Kanom" as they call them. It's just an excuse to sit  around and have a chat. It's more of a social event than anything else. And, of course,if you are sitting around talking and eating then you're not working!

 
working

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