How does sugar stop hiccups?

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  1. tlmcgaa70 profile image74
    tlmcgaa70posted 5 years ago

    How does sugar stop hiccups?

  2. Shawnte87 profile image86
    Shawnte87posted 5 years ago

    Sugar stops hiccups? It usually brings on hiccups for me :s.

  3. BlissfulWriter profile image73
    BlissfulWriterposted 5 years ago

    Surprising, but it may be true.   For many people, it may help with chronic hiccups: http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2005/12/ … for-hiccu/

    It is worth a try.  But of course, sugar has it own problems.

    1. tlmcgaa70 profile image74
      tlmcgaa70posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Whenever I get hiccups a teaspoon of sugar stops them instantly. I just wondered how it worked. I will check your link out. Thank you

  4. lifetips123 profile image61
    lifetips123posted 5 years ago

    The spasmotic contraction of the diaphragm muscles is the real reason for hiccups. The volume of the rib cage will be usually increased by the diaphragm to draw air into the lungs.

    Most of us are unaware about how this happens as this goes away quickly. But, it should be considered as chronic and need medical intervention if it lasts for more than three days. There are many types of  medical treatments published by many magazines.

    Also, number of home remedies are also there for stopping hiccups.

    A spoon full of sugar might stop hiccups. Basically, it depends on what you do with the spoon full of sugar and "it is not the sugar that stops hiccups".   If a spoon full of sugar is deposited into mouth, we will probably become a little uncomfortable as to how to try to swallow it.   The nerves in throat and  oesophagus will be stimulated and will affect nerves of the diaphragm.  So it should be kept in mind that most of these kind of remedies will be involving activities to put something into the mouth that can activate nerve reflex that affects the diaphragm.

    When  we put a spoon full of sugar as a remedy into our mouth, then the only thing that happens to stop the hiccups will just be a coincidence in timing as most hiccups stop quickly anyway.

  5. padmendra profile image45
    padmendraposted 5 years ago

    Its a beautiful question and sometimes seems to be so mysterious that I even keep on thinking the same. But as per me,  sugar is not what that cures the hiccups, however, anything which is swallowed cures the same.

  6. fpherj48 profile image77
    fpherj48posted 5 years ago

    Actually, sugar does not stop hiccups.  It is 1. your positive attitude in believing sugar works.  2.  The concentration used in taking the sugar, allowing it to dissolve and then swallowing.  3. and the slight variation of respiration this activity requires.
    Hiccups are spasms of the diaphragm, related directly to our pattern of breathing and any slight or major interruption to this (conscious or otherwise)  Therefore, to halt hiccups, it requires a correction of the spasms through physical & mental manipulation.
    Based on this theory, there is one repeatedly proven sure method to stop spasms, each and every time...   Placing a butter knife in a glass of water, so that the handle of the knife can rest on the bridge of your nose, as you tip your head to drink.  The combination of...concentration (mind), the position of the head and throat (physical) and swallowing the water (holding your breath)  works like an absolute charm..............Sugar is not the hero.

  7. Gina145 profile image82
    Gina145posted 5 years ago

    I've never heard of using sugar to stop hiccups before.
    For years I struggled with hiccups as nothing I tried seemed to work.  I finally discovered that a spoon of apple cider vinegar would get rid of them very quickly.  One day a made a mistake and took ordinary vinegar instead and that did the trick too.
    Maybe next time I get hiccups I'll try sugar because I don't usually have access to vinegar if I get hiccups when I'm not at home.

  8. doctorulna profile image60
    doctorulnaposted 5 years ago

    There is something called placebo,which means a simulated medical treatment for a condition.It does not neccessarily mean that the sugar has any proven therapeutic effect in getting rid of the hiccups,but the mere belief that it works will apparently relief your hiccups,since your belief system has been tailored with the fact that sugar works for hiccups.In the true sense of it hiccups are bound to stop spontaneously in most cases without any therapy.

  9. Cathy Fidelibus profile image80
    Cathy Fidelibusposted 5 years ago

    Anything that causes you to hold your breath causes a  carbon dioxide build up in the blood; this stops the hiccups(sugar and honey methods are not suitable for infants)

  10. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    Sugar has not been proven to stop hiccups, nor do they really know what causes hiccups although there are several theories. Or what is the cure for that matter.

  11. Goody5 profile image63
    Goody5posted 5 years ago

    Holding my breath has always worked the best for me. Keep on hubbing  smile

 
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