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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (19 posts)

What is PTSD?

  1. phtech profile image80
    phtechposted 4 years ago

    What is PTSD?

    How does it affect soldiers?

  2. jasmith1 profile image84
    jasmith1posted 4 years ago

    PTSD stands for Post traumatic stress disorder. It occurs as a result of a traumatic experience, commonly life threatening situations. Due to these events, the individual will have stress-related reactions that do not go away and cause distress and affect everyday life. One of the more common reactions is reliving the traumatic event in nightmares or memories that keep occuring.

    1. artist101 profile image68
      artist101posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer. Most people think of soldiers, but it can apply to any life event that causes suffering, undue stress, and strife. Toward the end of my fathers life, he experienced it, from flash backs to the war, the woman, and children who he saw die

    2. phtech profile image80
      phtechposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the insight. I know it affects more people than soldiers, but that's who my focus is on.

  3. sparkster profile image93
    sparksterposted 4 years ago

    PTSD stands for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - in the case of war veterans and soldiers, it's sometimes called Shell-Shock (after seeing another soldier being blown apart during war, for example).  This doesn't necessarily have to be so severe though, as the previous answer states the sufferer may go on living the experience.  The most common symptoms of PTSD are flashbacks and nightmares of the traumatic experience.  However, severe types of abuse, stress, harassment, etc can also cause PTSD.  In most cases I believe it takes about 5 years to recover from PTSD.

    1. phtech profile image80
      phtechposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the feedback. I'm glad everyone knows what it is.

  4. profile image0
    Deborah Sextonposted 4 years ago

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is a condition of persistent mental and emotional stress occurring as a result of injury or severe psychological shock, typically involving disturbance of sleep and constant vivid recall of the experience, with dulled responses to others and to the outside world.

    1. wildlifeofbd profile image57
      wildlifeofbdposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I have Post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD problems as I suffered grievous road accident some years ago. The symptoms were sever in months of accidents. There were hallucinations.Gradually symptoms decreased.

    2. profile image0
      Deborah Sextonposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Sorry to hear that you went through so much and happy to hear you are getting better

    3. phtech profile image80
      phtechposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'm sorry you experience these horrible things. The Army training and operations that I've done gives me nightmares to the point that I don't want to sleep. I experience anger that I didn't have before either.

  5. las81071 profile image72
    las81071posted 4 years ago

    post tramatic stress disorder. I am probably spelling wrong. They have a lot of emotional issues from what I understand

  6. starme77 profile image74
    starme77posted 4 years ago

    PTSD comes about after a major trauma that the brain can not fully process. It is different for different people. Some have severe flashbacks of the trauma, while others simply develope anxiety disorders. A person can have multiple traumas which result in multiple cases of PTSD at the same time.

    1. phtech profile image80
      phtechposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I never thought of multiple occasions adding symptoms. That would make sense as to why certain triggers can affect you in different ways.

  7. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 4 years ago

    I have P.T.S.D and have written about it extensively. It is something I would not wish upon anyone. It can take control of your life and all aspects of your life. You may want to read my hub:

    http://jthomp42.hubpages.com/hub/Posttr … order-PTSD

    1. phtech profile image80
      phtechposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the hub. I will definitely read it. I'm sorry you have PTSD and wish you the best on the road to coping with it.

  8. phtech profile image80
    phtechposted 4 years ago

    Thanks everyone for their input! I am thinking about starting an online campaign to raise awareness for soldiers who have PTSD. If anyone has any suggestions as to what I should put on my site, or groups that I could raise money for, my email is phtechradio@gmail.com. I'm going to put my first payout from HP as a donation to one of the groups that I choose. Thanks everyone.

    1. artist101 profile image68
      artist101posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      great idea, might want to try your local veterans organizations. Such as american legions, or vfw posts. Will share to facebook.

    2. phtech profile image80
      phtechposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Ok thanks very much. I got a very basic website started, though since I'm on vacation for my friend's wedding, I don't have more time to work on it. supportustroops.webs.com

  9. calmclinic profile image67
    calmclinicposted 4 years ago

    It is a syndrome most common not just in soldiers but also in other high risk professions, such as Policemen and Firefighters. It is also experienced by people who went through traumatic experiences such as crimes, accidents, disasters and the like. When they have been subjected to such traumatic experiences and are unable to get past it, this state of mind progresses into more serious psychological problems and behavior modifications that often have damaging results. This is the reason why soldiers need to undergo destress therapy sessions in order to overcome or avoid it from developing into more serious conditions.

 
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