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How can you help a gambler stop?

  1. DDE profile image27
    DDEposted 3 years ago

    How can you help a gambler stop?

    He has been a gambler for all his life and he does not see it as a problem. It is difficult to talk about the problem to him. His money and that is it. He avoids reality by making gambling his priority. How would you approach such an individual to  ask him to stop  his addiction?

  2. janshares profile image98
    jansharesposted 3 years ago

    That's a tough one, DDE, as with any addiction. It's harder to deal with gambling addiction because the gambler can rationalize that he/she isn't doing physical damage to the body or physically putting anyone else at risk. The gambler also justifies the behavior by saying they have free will to do whatever they wish with the money they earned as long as they take care of their responsibilities.
    Until the gambler runs out of money, cannot pay the mortgage, becomes homeless, gets in legal trouble, or resorts to stealing from others to support the habit, there isn't much you can do to make him stop.

    1. DDE profile image27
      DDEposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi janshares well-pointed out it is a tough one. Your answer is my best one thank you.

    2. janshares profile image98
      jansharesposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You're welcome, thank you.

  3. The Examiner-1 profile image73
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    Easy. Stop production of cards, dice and all other gambling devices. Make it illegal to gamble on sports: football, horse racing and such.

    1. DDE profile image27
      DDEposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you '' if only,'' that could be as simple as mentioned or as it sounds.

    2. profile image0
      Anastasia Rokinaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      By that logic we should eliminate anything that has the potential to be addictive, which means almost everything (sugary foods, prescription meds, sex, the gym etc.)

      The problem isn't in the substance/activity, it's in the mind of the addict.

  4. connorj profile image77
    connorjposted 3 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/11903802_f260.jpg

    I have absolutely no experience either first-hand or second-hand with this; however, if perhaps one could understand the logic that the "house" must always bring in more than it "gives" out; then the only way to "beat" the house would be not to play against it but most interestingly play for it. In other words work for the "house" in some capacity to "come" to understand that it is a "for profit" organization that wants to make a "h-e- double hockey sticks of a lotta" money to keep every shareholder happy...

    1. DDE profile image27
      DDEposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you sounds  helpful.

  5. Zelkiiro profile image94
    Zelkiiroposted 3 years ago

    You can't cure an addictive personality. All you can do is direct them to safer, less destructive outlets for their gambling tendencies. Many video games (as in actual video games, not any of that mobile tablet/iOS bollocks that you people seem to like for some reason) can help, as they employ the same Skinner Box tactics a roulette wheel or a slot machine does, but without the dangerous side-effect of going bankrupt.

    1. DDE profile image27
      DDEposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you and once addicted the individual is not easily returned themselves.

  6. profile image0
    Anastasia Rokinaposted 3 years ago

    You can't.

    It's an unfortunate truth, but a truth nonetheless. You can dedicate your entire life to trying to help someone, but unless they truly want to help themselves, you are only losing your time and energy.

    The most we can do is be there when they need us. We need to offer our support if and when they decide to get better. After all, it gets worse before it gets better, and the most we can do is be there.

    The rest is up to them.

 
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