Would you move if you found out your landlord had a serious criminal background?

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  1. peeples profile image94
    peeplesposted 4 years ago

    Would you move if you found out your landlord had a serious criminal background?

    Long story short - Our apartment is attached to her home with a door that has no lock. That door goes into shared laundry room. Her charges start in 1994 and go all the way through a charge she is out on bail for. Some examples of her charges Burglary first degree, forgery, grand larceny, DUI 3 times, Fraudulent checks, and a current charge of wrongful death that doesn't go back to court until next year. Would you wait for lease to run out or break lease?

  2. Express10 profile image88
    Express10posted 4 years ago

    Oh heck yes! I would be out of there and break the lease. If there is any place you should have peace and peace of mind, it is your home. I'm not a criminal and don't want to live closely to them. That is too close for me.

    1. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I was thinking the same but moving is costly. Thinking of suing her for the roof leak she keeps half way fixing until the next rain when it leaks again.

    2. Express10 profile image88
      Express10posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe you can find a loophole in your lease or a subletter with the landlord's approval? I've also seen people successfully air dirty laundry like this on local news stations and get what they were seeking. I sure hope you get out + peace of mind.

  3. Lady Guinevere profile image60
    Lady Guinevereposted 4 years ago

    I would def break the lease. Do you know if her thievery was associated with your apartments that you live in now?  I would leave asap.

    1. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It doesn't appear so, but certainly concerning!

  4. fpherj48 profile image78
    fpherj48posted 4 years ago

    Oh brother......Don't you have any EASY questions, peeples?? LOL  Wow.
    1.  Obviously you had no clue prior to signing your Lease.......so basically, you might just have complete legal right to break any lease without a single consequence.....BUT....check that out (for free) by talking to someone with that kind of knowledge....maybe even your local Housing Authority.   If you have any connection to someone who works for an Attorney, that's perfect.
    2.  Did you get this info about her background from a totally reliable source?   It's not a pretty record that's for sure.
    3.  Would I move?.....Faster than Wile E. Coyote!   Her charges sound pretty much like scams she may have pulled on prior tenants......not to mention you don't really know the details.  It could be even worse than it sounds.   With kids.....Yeah...I'd be gone in a flash.
    She drinks, steals, forges and bounces checks......wrongful death?  GULP.   What the HELL  is that all about??
    4.  Did she give off any weird vibes or cause you any concern  B4 U knew all this?   
    What's that you say?  An UNLOCKED door?   Adios Amigo!!
    Start looking into rentals  TODAY.

    1. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Weird vibes is what made me look. I checked state public online records. I'm up to 24 charges in 3 counties, not even done looking yet. It seems they were all unrelated to this apartment that she just got 2 years ago. Frustrating!

    2. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      and it only gets more curious..100% sure the person in the records is HER & not someone w/ the same name? I would wonder how she could acquire a property w/ all her legal issues & expenses? Can u casually speak to neighbors?  I would. Keep di

    3. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      She's owner financing the home through an old man (84).  Definitely her, same middle name, same birthday, and in one I was able to pull her mug shot. I know her dad is well off, but don't know extent.

    4. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Oh My...an 84 yr old man? Do we see scam # 12 before our eyes?  Her wealthy Dad knows better than to give/lend her money.. Not a good sign. If moving is a financial strain, at least begin DOCUMENTING any thing you feel needs tracking.Now. "in case"

  5. ChristinS profile image94
    ChristinSposted 4 years ago

    I'd not only listen to fpherj48's sound advice - I would also install a lock on the door to the common area today.  You have a right to privacy and it is reasonable to have a lock on that door, even if it is a simple slide lock deadbolt on your side of it.  Moving is expensive granted,but that does not seem like a safe environment for your children.  yikes.

    1. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      We just came out of months of being homeless. Moving is going to be hard to do since we aren't fully reestablished yet, but it looks like we are going to have to figure out how. Buying lock tomorrow, but she isn't going to be happy when she finds it.

    2. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Christin is absolutely right about putting in a lock. This woman can't stop you from locking YOUR side of a door that leads to YOUR apt.  Why does she need access to your apt to get to the laundry room? You have a legal right to protect your stuff

  6. Kathleen Odenthal profile image94
    Kathleen Odenthalposted 4 years ago

    Absolutely. And I would report the landlord. That person should not be running an apartment or any type of housing arrangement for other people.

  7. bethperry profile image90
    bethperryposted 4 years ago

    I agree with Express10's suggestion.And make a checklist of all potential discrepancies, such as: has the landlord installed the required number of city/county smoke detectors to meet city or county requirements? Are there legally adequate emergency exitways? Has the landlord disclosed everything he or she is required by your state statutes? If your state requires a landlord to offer one electrical appliance, have they met this? Has the building, apt. or home passed inspections regarding asbestos? Do the toilets meet federal and state regulations on flowage levels? Has the landlord committed a crime in which his or her name is required on the National Sex Offender Registry, and yet he or she has failed to disclose to you? Has the landlord failed to disclose to you ANYTHING that is required by your state laws that falls under tenant rights to disclosure?

    If you discover the landlord has failed to meet all local and federal requirements you can probably get out of the lease no problem. I've encountered a few BAD landlords, so I wish you the best of luck getting far, far from this individual!

  8. profile image0
    Richie Alburoposted 4 years ago

    Definitely yes.Specially,  my kinds of work, i spend 10 months on the ship.Only 2 months at home.The reason why i work hard outside of my country to give my family security including their safety.

  9. freecampingaussie profile image62
    freecampingaussieposted 4 years ago

    Going going gone .. Value life too much to hang around .. I would get out without saying a word ASAP.. Most likely when she was out or at night ..and go to the police. Sort out anything else after that ...

  10. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 4 years ago

    Under the conditions you described I would move (after giving my 30 day notice) of course. I honestly can't imagine moving into an apartment attached to my landlord's home unless it was under dire circumstances.
    Legally if you break a lease without something out of the norm suddenly happen making it impossible to live there would make you liable. You'd have to have photos and proof it's unlivable. The courts oftentimes will want to see that the landlord was given ample time to address the problem.
    You may want to check your state laws on landlord tenant leases. If you have not observed any shady behavior you might be better off to ride out the lease unless you can afford pay rent for a place you will no longer live in. You might check your lease to see if it has a an early-release clause.
    Some landlords have been known to allow tenants to break a lease by adding an amendment with certain penalties.
    When I moved from California to Chicago I had to break my lease.  However it was with a large apartment complex. The deal they worked out for me was I had to continue to pay for the apartment until they found a new tenant.  It was located in a beach town and was a high end apartment and the grounds had lots of amenities. Someone moved in few weeks after I moved out.

  11. FeniqueS profile image74
    FeniqueSposted 4 years ago

    All the answers here are good and pick out suggestions from each one and compare to what you find out.   I use to be an investigator, and homeless too.  So I know moving is and can be costly.   I'd not move so soon, would not dismiss the thought though until I knew everything to my satisfaction.   
    1. go to court records and look up her case file and read it get copies if they will allow some courts will. 

    2. check with your lock community action program and you could get a lock from them.  Some place community places have the energy assistance program and they will sometimes have locks from their weatherization programs they run. 
    3. If she is not holding up to her part as a landlord make a list and take it with to the community action office and they can let you know where you can go to get help and most times help with moving too if you still need  or want too. 
    4.  In being a investigator, I've found with a lot of people with criminal backgrounds they don't tell for fear of just this.  people will automatically find them unfit for their society and will form all kinds of weird things in their heads against the person.   After you go to court house, and read over everything. Think about this, go and sit and talk with her, get her side of everything not just what you read on paper made by those paid to belittle and De-humanize people. And that don't include the person pain background of a person that drove them to crime.  Remember you and your family were homeless and when you're homeless or on verge some people will do some really dumb things to survive.  Not saying its right, cause its way far from it.   

    5. If not for the grace of God go I...(I know your stand on God, did not mean any disrespect in staying this, so please forgive me).   You don't know a person or what they have been through or going through from reading legal documents.  The wrongful death, may have been from the one of the DUI's someone was killed.  If so just try to imagine what she is going through having to live with that the rest of her life. 

    Peeples, I LOVE YOUR QUESTIONS, ALL ARE THOUGHT PROVOKERS!

    1. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I really think you have the best answer to Peeples problem. I think some people are urging her to act hastily and in a way she may come to regret either emotionally or legally.

    2. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Don't worry Miz, I know most of the laws and don't plan on doing anything hastily other than getting the lock installed.

  12. bravewarrior profile image93
    bravewarriorposted 4 years ago

    I'd get the hell out of there and in a hurry! Chances are she'll find a reason not to return your deposit anyway, so why wait until the lease is up? Have you considered buying instead of renting? Often, rentals are available with lease and option to buy. Something you might want to look into.

    If you stick around where you are now, you're liable to become the next victim of her criminal mind.

    1. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Agreed, Sha....As a matter of fact, peeples...I HOPE ur making phone calls right now. This gets much more sinister as we interact.  I believe the law will back U w/ all her VIOLATIONS.  What do the other tenants say?

    2. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I only really interact with one set of them, the others do not speak English well, the ones I do interact with  are weirded out also but are older and on one SSI check per month. They have no options. I called and left message with housing authority.

  13. MizBejabbers profile image91
    MizBejabbersposted 4 years ago

    I am a landlord, and I can tell you that you are getting some advice that could cost you money. I have every sympathy for you, and there is no excuse in her putting you in this situation but there is a legal way to handle this.
    First off, if the woman didn’t advise you of her background, you probably have tenant rights here regardless of a lease. Your best bet is to walk in to your prosecuting attorney’s office on the pretense of filing a complaint. You don’t have to go through with the actual filing, and the PA may not even let you, but the PA will advise you of your rights FREE. Do this immediately after you install the lock.
    Sometimes even a paid attorney will give you bad advice if you consult one that does not have a specialty in landlord-tenant or real estate law.
    Do not call Code Enforcement yet. To try to use Code as an excuse to break a lease can get you into a legal battle that could cost you money. Most states have a little thing called “retribution” in the law, and that is not a good thing to get into. You have a legal justification already, so use it. Keep your nose clean on this one if you can.
    If all else fails, move out when she isn’t home or she may cause a scene and even call the police on you. The police listen to the one who calls them, and the other person usually ends up with the short end of the stick. I would see the prosecuting attorney before I did anything. You don’t have to file charges, just let THEM advise you of your rights.
    This is SCARY, so please handle with care and let us know how it turns out.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      The roof leak wasn't in your original question. That is definitely a Code violation and can be reported if she doesn't fix that.

    2. FeniqueS profile image74
      FeniqueSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      MizBejabbers, would Fair housing be helpful and legal Aid?

    3. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'm not sure about what all Fair Housing covers, try it. Legal aid might be willing to help you, but in my state, legal aid goes to bat only if the party files a lawsuit. If that is the case, they might still give you some advice on how to avoid one.

  14. luisj305 profile image85
    luisj305posted 4 years ago

    That really depends on if you feel she is a threat. Which she shouldn't be considering you are her long term customer. But who ever really knows if you can trust someone right?  Tell her you want a lock on your side to the shared room. And the leak fixed or you move out, straightforward with no b.s. if you're worried about moving expenses, fix these things yourself out of pocket and charge her for it by subtracting costs on your next month rent payment.
      A simple and cheap solution would be to put a simple chain slide lock on your side which may cost 3$ at a hardware store and take 10 minutes to install. Or pad lock with hinges which may cost 7-10$. But is more secure. Keep this to yourself and if she mentions it, you'll know she was trying to get in. Thats your cue to pack up n go. Hopefully only you have access through the front door.. The leak is most probably something that needs professional attention.

    1. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, landlords may "go into your apt," for maintenance....BUT only at your request or permission and must give you notice.  No way can she go in & out at will.....especially when you are not at home!!  This woman is simply up to NO GOOD. RED FLAG

  15. peeples profile image94
    peeplesposted 4 years ago

    Thank you everyone. First, we moved here as a last resort. We had been homeless for several months with 3 children and living in a hotel was not only cramped, but costly. This let us into a lease that was short (6 months that we are 2 months into). It also lowered what we were paying each month so we could catch up on other bills that got behind while we were forking over $400 a week on a hotel. The woman is a fast talker that we (me, husband, and people in the apartment at the other end of her house) have caught in numerous lies. We have had an on going leak over my bed and dresser that she gets her husband or cheap labor to work on but it continues to leak every time it rains. With that said she has been very kind to me and my children. She worked out the deposit when we moved in so that it was worked off over a couple weeks. However, she comes into our apartment when we are not here, today she came in while I was gone and placed mouse repellant in here. There's always a "maintenance" excuse since that is the clause in our lease that let's her come in anytime. She never leaves us alone. Has texted me over 400 times in the last 2 weeks for random things. I finally checked her because I had planned on leaving my youngest with her for a couple hours while I went to take a test, but she kept making me feel weird. I found a total of 29 charges over 20 years, in four counties. There is a serious history that has been on going. without much of a break. I am rather familiar with state laws, (use to be property manager) but I am not familiar with this particular county's housing code requirements.  I know the roof gives us an out, but it would still be an out we would have to pay for. My husband is buying a lock tomorrow afternoon, and I am calling our local real estate attorney just to get an idea of what my rights are. She's kind, but her past and some of her current actions lead me to believe that kindness is fake. All 3 sets of tenants (including us) moved in within a week, and that makes me wonder why all the previous left at the same time. We have paid all of our rent on time and have followed our side of the contract, and plan to keep it that way until we know for sure what our rights are. Thank you for all of the great answers!

    1. Express10 profile image88
      Express10posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Set up a page on GoFundMe and I'll contribute. Blessings, peace and safety to you and your family!!!

    2. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Of course, she's VERY KIND.....Never met a con-artist/Scammer in my life that didn't play a number of "roles" extremely well.  Before you can get close enough to do someone damage...U need to get them to LIKE and trust U.  OLD game...same M.O.

    3. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you express, but I didn't post this to get anything other than opinions and emotional support! I greatly appreciate the thought! Yes fpherj I agree!

    4. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      The "wrongful DEATH charge keeps bothering me.My gut tells me U need to move swiftly. It's possible that 84 yr.old man could turn up dead in the near future.Stay as clear of her as possible! U say she has a husband?  Did you run a check on HIM??

    5. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      They just married in November, and he seems to have a clean criminal back ground other than a couple of tickets (at least in surrounding counties). Makes me nervous to, but there is no information I can find with details.

    6. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Local housing codes are usually online. Please look up and read them. Ours say a landlord can't enter when the occupant is absent without permission or in case of an emergency. The mouse bait could be installed when you are home. It's an excuse.

    7. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I agree miz, but I do know that if the lease states they can enter anytime for maintenance then they can. Lease has a special section that states anytime between 9 and 5 for maintenance.

    8. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Not good. The lease my tenants sign with me say "with permission or for an emergency". I wouldn't sign a lease that says anytime between 9 and 5 unless it said "with permission". I signed one like that one time as a tenant and he used it to spy on me

    9. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      She VIOLATED the law w/ that clause in your lease.State law mandates tenants have full right to "privacy.".She may NOT "ask"you to permit access 24/7 4 maintenence!  U & hubby need to fine tooth comb apt for any electronic devices!...cameras, wir

    10. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Finally got into it with her. Yesterday she knew we were gone for the day and sent me a text telling me she was going into my apt w/ a roofer (on 4th) I told her not possible because of lock, she told me I couldn't, ended heated with me home. Ridicul

    11. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      peeples...Pls don't leave us hanging in utter suspense & concern.  Start a new thread or write a hub about this situation, so readers will know how this tenant/landlord situation worked out. This is informative in terms of "rights" of renters.

    12. peeples profile image94
      peeplesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Stuck here until I get my grant refunds from college next month or early sept. Roof leaked again after she supposedly had it fixed yet again on 4th of July. BS. This has become my place to vent since she is on my FB I can't vent there. Sorry all!

    13. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Her being on FB is exactly why you SHOULD vent there!  Let her know ur on to her & not afraid to expose her.  Way too many red flags, peeples. U need to inform housing authorities.  Protect future innocent tenants from her "tricks."

  16. Melissa Noon profile image76
    Melissa Noonposted 4 years ago

    Looking at the crime the landlord is charged with, I think breaking the lease is acceptable. You can contact a lawyer firm to see if you have just cause in breaking your lease so you can get your deposit back or she can't sue you for leaving early.

    Still I feel sorry for your landlord. She had not had the nicest of lives has she?

  17. SatendraSaini profile image67
    SatendraSainiposted 4 years ago

    Actually its depend your behave with him. Or it depends on his activity. If he used to do some unususal activity then you have to move. Either its ok you may live as well.
    If all else fails, move out when she isn’t home or she may cause a scene and even call the police on you. The police listen to the one who calls them, and the other person usually ends up with the short end of the stick. I would see the prosecuting attorney before I did anything. You don’t have to file charges, just let THEM advise you of your rights.

  18. esteniomodira profile image68
    esteniomodiraposted 4 years ago

    I would definitely break It lol. I wouldn't want to take any risks.

  19. Bellas blog18 profile image59
    Bellas blog18posted 4 years ago

    If your landlord has not done any criminal things to you I think you'll be fine. If you suspect he has done something leave and fine a new place to stay.

  20. Hezekiah profile image85
    Hezekiahposted 4 years ago

    I would be out of there in a second. What with a criminal record AND free access to your property. Forget about contracts and leases.

 
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