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Drought USA

  1. profile image0
    rickyliceaposted 5 years ago

    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6944056_f248.jpg


    http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/  (Map of Drought)

    "July 22 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
    reports indicated that 55 percent of the nation’s pasture and
    rangeland was in poor to very poor condition, breaking last
    week’s record."

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-07-2 … text-.html

    Is this a preview of the effects that Global Warming will have in the U.S?
    Will this cause a massive increase in food prices?

    1. Mighty Mom profile image89
      Mighty Momposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It cannot help but affect food prices.
      But don't dare mention the words "global warming" or "climate change" or else no one will talk to you!
      tongue

      1. profile image0
        rickyliceaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        lol

        Supposedly global warming will help Canada, so that should somewhat balance any lost production in the U.S.

    2. Josak profile image59
      Josakposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Is this a preview of global warming in the US? Maybe it's really hard to say. Will it cause food prices to rise absolutely yes.

    3. undermyhat profile image61
      undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Indiana is in real trouble.  That means higher corn prices.  Corn is an ingredient, base and additive, in so many different things that the general level of food prices will move up.

      My front lawn is bone dry, reservoir levels are down.  Every promise of rain bypasses the state.  Worst drought in Indiana since the 1930s - not since the end of the last ice age - as far as anyone knows.  If this is what global warming looks like - I will take it.  No more snow shoveling, slide offs, ice storms, long, dark, frigid, depressing Februaries - sounds like heaven.

      1. profile image0
        rickyliceaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        "Worst drought in Indiana since the 1930s - not since the end of the last ice age - as far as anyone knows."
        WOW!!!
        I wish your home state of Indiana and your front lawn the best.
        Hopefully things will shortly improve.

        1. undermyhat profile image61
          undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          The best thing that could happen to my front lawn is for it to be replaced with a Nevada style rock and cactus garden so I don't have to mow it anymore.  Fat chance though, as soon as the drought breaks the wife will be chasing me outside.

          1. profile image0
            rickyliceaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            I've always taken a survival of the fittest approach to lawns.

    4. Will Apse profile image88
      Will Apseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There are a lot of studies of the increasing incidence of extreme weather and its relation to climate change.

      The American Meteorological Society pumps out report after report like this one: http://www.ametsoc.org/atmospolicy/clim … Gleick.pdf

      I lost interest when I hit fifty, to be honest, expecting to be dead before the worst arrived (you can only care so much).

      Now I am starting to wonder if I was living in false expectations. Suddenly things are starting to move very fast. For example, 97 per cent of Greenland's icecap melted this month.

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree … sheet-melt

      That is scary...

      1. undermyhat profile image61
        undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        So if it keeps getting warmer Greenland will be available for cultivation,  all that fresh water will be released into the ocean and cool it, and more moisture will be in the atmosphere?  So cooler water, more moisture, more arable land - sounds like the perfect environment to grow crops.  Sounds awesome.

        1. Will Apse profile image88
          Will Apseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Well, you might need to quit large areas of the US. So start making offers. You better be quick though. That kind of melting event (repeated only a few times) would be enough to disrupt the gulf stream. Which would most likely mean a new ice age in Western Europe. You might have to share with some rowdy Germans.

          1. undermyhat profile image61
            undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Plenty of Germans in Indiana already - settled the So-East part of state - in towns like Oldenberg.  A new Ice Age is more like the return of the Ice Age - has happened many times in the past.  Indiana bares the "scars" of the last major North American glaciers.  Maybe learn to hunt polar bear in my back yard - also sounds awesome.

  2. paradigmsearch profile image87
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    I've already seen one report stating that we are positively going to get buried in food price increases. And even if there wasn't a food shortage, the drought will be used as an excuse to raise prices through the roof anyway à la just like the oil companies do when there's negative oil news.

    1. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Of course it will cause a rise in food prices *and gasoline* .... Nearly everything you eat has some form of corn in it. If we do not have enough corn to meet demand price goes up.

      1. profile image0
        rickyliceaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Yeah and corn is used to produce ethanol, which ties in with oil prices.

    2. Barbara Kay profile image86
      Barbara Kayposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The lack of corn will cause most meat prices to go up, because corn is used to feed meat animals. Dairy products will go up too.

  3. profile image0
    rickyliceaposted 5 years ago

    I found this other drought map seems Northern Mexico is also suffering a severe drought, while Canada is doing o.k.

    http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/temp-and-preci … -maps.php?
    lang=en&year=2012&month=6&submitted=true

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/6944219_f248.jpg

  4. Kangaroo_Jase profile image82
    Kangaroo_Jaseposted 5 years ago

    This is pretty significant as it affects parity prices for wheat, barley, oats, corn and other grown grains around the world. We, in Australia, are already starting to see rises in prices due to grain and feed, as feed prices get higher, so do the produce it feeds.

    Australia endured a near record 11 year drought that broke in 2009/2010. We are 22 million people.

    A near decade long drought in the USA would be more devastating on a scale unimaginable (180 million+ population), especially to an already battered US economy.

    If this current situation doesn't turn around over the next 12-18 months, we could have a new crises on our hands.

    1. undermyhat profile image61
      undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      A population of over 275 million and a giant food exporter.  The demand for Indiana hogs and sow beans is very high, especially in Asia, could be good news for Australian exports but not its dinner tables.

      1. Kangaroo_Jase profile image82
        Kangaroo_Jaseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Ok 275 million, my stats are a little rusty. It will not be too bad for Aussies, we are abundant with food even if prices rise. Wil also be good for our export industry.

        1. undermyhat profile image61
          undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Between drought and flood you blokes could use a break.

  5. ocbill profile image66
    ocbillposted 5 years ago

    Inflation in this country is gonna be a ..... for many.   Housing, gas, and food will skyrocket while wages stay where they are. That's not a good recipe.

    1. undermyhat profile image61
      undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Gas and food are not included in inflation rates.

  6. Disturbia profile image60
    Disturbiaposted 5 years ago

    My friends from Texas blame the heat waves and droughts on the wind farms. They tell me the wind farms heat up the land underneath them which can change weather and rainfall patterns.

    1. undermyhat profile image61
      undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      As reasonable as believing that driving a v-8 kills polar bears but Al Gore flatulance doesn't.

    2. Will Apse profile image88
      Will Apseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      lol

      1. undermyhat profile image61
        undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I wonder if the massive wind farms now dotting the American landscape  cannot possibly affect the environment, given the scope and scale of those farms, while automobiles are accepted as a primary cause of global warming.  Isn't it worthy of scientific inquiry?

        1. Will Apse profile image88
          Will Apseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          I think you will find that they work on different principles.

          1. undermyhat profile image61
            undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Both physical and political - however, given the increased manufcature and employment of those windmills it is likely that there is, indeed, some kind of environmental impact.

  7. Sawfishlagoon profile image60
    Sawfishlagoonposted 5 years ago

    The globe has always fluctuated. The activities of man do have an effect on the atmosphere. It would be ignorant to think that doesn't affect weather somehow. Man was created on the earth. We are part of the natural order. So, it is a natural occurrence when our activities effect the environment. Unlike other blights, man has the choice not to be one.

    Get ready. In a short time, there will be nothing on the shelf but off brand tomato soup. I hope you have a garden.

  8. jacharless profile image77
    jacharlessposted 5 years ago

    It is not surprising in view not lieu {thanks for the correction Aficionada! Man I am tired today. } of the drought, a massive push for micro-home farming was strongly recommended by the Americana political swarm. What did they know.

    The increase of electronic emissions has been off the charts for the last decade. Couple that with constant noise pollution -planes, rockets, heavy machinery, trains, and such. The decibel level is 120% higher than natures normal production/frequency. That alone can set off a series of events from earthquakes, volcanic eruptions to major atmospheric changes -changes that would certainly effect rain clouds.

    Already the food prices are high in the States.
    A single loaf of bread is nearly 4$, cows milk 5$, head of fresh broccoli 3.50$. Just ridiculous. We are starting to home-grow, from seed. Way less expensive -and completely controllable for volume, pesticide, etc. Only issue is space. New york isn't know for Babylonian Roof Gardens -but they are famous for Roof Top BBQ Hot Hub Parties. lol.

    One more note: with this level of drought, the States could find themselves in Russia's situation, just at the head of the Great Depression. Everything is ripe for it -economics, wages, jobs, product, food, energy prices.

    James

    1. undermyhat profile image61
      undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Now I am depressed.

    2. Aficionada profile image90
      Aficionadaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Don't you actually mean "in view of"? ("In lieu of"="instead of")


      Hey, UMH, we are having a wonderful, welcome rainstorm in SC Indiana right now - well, it's tapering off a little after a half--hour of energetic weather. Maybe too much at one time? But it's too soon to tell, AFAIK.

      What's it looking like up there in Indy?

      1. undermyhat profile image61
        undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I almost wept with joy when I heard a severe thunderstorm advisory over the radio around 2:30.  Good to meet another Hoosier on here.

        1. Aficionada profile image90
          Aficionadaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Indeed!!

          We got a deluge here, and it lasted about half an hour. We even had some little hailstones, but just barely big enough to notice. And my hubby says there are two more storm cells headed this way. Woo-hoo! --- I think.....

          PS - I think there are several Hoosiers on HP, but some of them ignore the forums. Me, I spend too much time in them.  I guess I make up for the ones that are AWOL. Lol.

          1. undermyhat profile image61
            undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Looks like most of the rain will pass South of Indianapolis.   It is not unusual, Indianapolis is prone to sitting at the bottom of a heat inversion.  Has happened before will happen again.

            It would be nice to form a Hoosier writers' group on here.  I think ignoring the forums is advisable.  I participate as a kind of mental yoga.  I need to do some serious writing soon, I am full of ideas and about to pop.

            1. Aficionada profile image90
              Aficionadaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              I like the idea of a Hoosier writers' group. I've thought on several occasions that I would like to have a Meetup, if nothing else. Which side of Indy do you live on?

              1. undermyhat profile image61
                undermyhatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

                Live about a mile from Eagle Creek Park - great place and work in Greenwood - also great place, especially for food and drink.

                1. Aficionada profile image90
                  Aficionadaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

                  We should come up with a plan to have a Meetup in Greenwood and see who all would show up. big_smile

                  By the way,

                  I believe we need to thank you for your good wishes, rickylicea!  See, within just 17-18 hours of those wishes, my Indiana front lawn got some happy relief. big_smile. You might have a side career possible working in drought-stricken areas. Can you do something about global warming?

                  1. profile image0
                    rickyliceaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

                    Haha I wish.
                    Although I know a guy who claims he can do that and as a bonus shape shift into whatever animal you want.


                    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6948176_f248.jpg

          2. Barbara Kay profile image86
            Barbara Kayposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            We finally got some rain here in Michigan too. We had only gotten 1/2" in almost 6 weeks, but got almost 2 inches in the last 2 days. Everything is still brown and crunchy unless it was irrigated.

    3. Barbara Kay profile image86
      Barbara Kayposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      James, New York's price sounded higher than ours. Prices are that high, but on a weekly basis you can get milk on sale for $2.50 and bread for around $2.00. If we had more jobs, I'd say move to Michigan.

 
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