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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (10 posts)

Are arguments really a reason for relationship to end?

  1. Hazel Abee profile image76
    Hazel Abeeposted 2 years ago

    Are arguments really a reason for relationship to end?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12459011_f260.jpg

  2. liesl5858 profile image88
    liesl5858posted 2 years ago

    Sometimes arguments help you to grow and learn from each others mistakes then move on and sometimes it might end a relationship if that relationship is not strong enough to cope with arguments.
    It is better to argue about things as long as there is no physical violence. It depends on the couple too if they want to make up or break up. Also it is better to let out what you are thinking rather than keep it inside you where it hurts you more and might even make you ill.

    1. Hazel Abee profile image76
      Hazel Abeeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yup no physical abuse ... and no abusive words too .. Just argument to settle some issues is still fine

  3. Jeannieinabottle profile image91
    Jeannieinabottleposted 2 years ago

    It depends on how much you are arguing.  An argument every now and then that gets resolved is normal.  However, if you are arguing more than you are having normal conversations, that is a bad sign. 

    Basically, I look at it this way: when you start to cry more than you laugh when you are with your partner, the relationship is bad.

    1. Hazel Abee profile image76
      Hazel Abeeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Normally there are arguments that does not get resolved because one party gives up as there is no point in the argument ..

  4. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    It really depends on what the arguments are about and their frequency. Personally I'm not a fan of fighting all the time.
    Generally speaking if you don't agree or get along most of the time that's a sign that you may have chosen the wrong mate.
    If the goal is to "change" someone it usually leads to frustration on our part and resentment on the part of our mate. Very few people are walking around with a hand raised in the air screaming;
    "I'm looking for someone to change me!"
    Most people want to be loved and appreciated for (they) are.
    Couples that get along, share the same values, and want the same things for the relationship tend to be happier and stay together.
    Like attracts like and opposites attract divorce attorneys!
    Having said that there are some people who love to have debates or banter back and forth. Once again it becomes a matter of finding a mate who enjoys that as well. Very few people want a volatile relationship where an argument/fight can break out at anytime.
    There are only two ways to experience joy and peace of mind in relationships. We either get what we want or we learn to be happy with what we have. Accept them as (is) or move on.
    The choice is up to us!

    1. Hazel Abee profile image76
      Hazel Abeeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I like t he part of 'changing' someone ... actually I stopped doing it long ago, when one of my friends asked me .. why do you want to ''Change' him . He has been who he is for so many years and that I should just learn to live with who he is ..

  5. KatyWhoWaited profile image81
    KatyWhoWaitedposted 2 years ago

    After my first husband left for my best friend, he told me once that they fought a lot as if it were a very good thing. He and I rarely fought.  I think he probably felt as if he was "safe" to express himself in that relationship.  My second husband and I fight a lot, or let's say disagree a lot.  I feel angry a great deal of the time. My husband usually counters with some convoluted logic that he learned as a kid to defend himself.  I hate the disagreements and arguing, absolutely hate it!  Sometimes we can have a logical, respectful conversation.  I have to almost "teach" him that he has a right to express his opinion.  Ugh!  I've given up on trying to understand relationships. I've given up trying to be a lovely, understanding, patient wife.  I'm just too old for that now. I would say that fair fighting, meaning understanding true negotiation and conflict resolution skills is MOST important for each partner as well as having a strong centered ego intact. .

    1. Hazel Abee profile image76
      Hazel Abeeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I hate disagreements and arguing as well .. but I agree that at one point we just give up being the 'looser' as well ... Its time we move on being the individual we wish to be . Probably you have made the right choice being who you are.

  6. Evane profile image62
    Evaneposted 2 years ago

    No, not really. Arguments, for me, can make a relationship healthy. But, the two should be able to solve it immediately peacefully.

 
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