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How do you create healthy Interfaith debate?

  1. profile image60
    ctnahdaposted 4 years ago

    How do you create healthy Interfaith debate?

    Have you ever been in such debate?

  2. M. T. Dremer profile image94
    M. T. Dremerposted 4 years ago

    I think the key to a healthy discussion between faiths is a matter of mutual respect, and thoughtful questions. Too often is a debate dominated by one side or the other. We must ask questions of each other, and then politely listen to the answer. If we dismiss the answer, or imply the person who gave it is a bad person, then it's not a debate, it's an attack.

    1. profile image60
      ctnahdaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for the response M.T.I do agree with you about mutual respect and thoughtful questions but sadly that is not the key elements in today's interfaith debate.

    2. lone77star profile image84
      lone77starposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Wonderful answer.

  3. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 4 years ago

    The key to a healthy debate about faith is do not ask the question. Atheists and non-believers will swarm on believers like a pack of wolves. Been there many times my friend just trying to spread the "good" news of Christ.

    1. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you ctnahda

    2. profile image60
      ctnahdaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Clarification- I as a muslim do believes in Jesus/Isa(Alaihisalam) as I do believes in all the messengers before him and after him(Muhammad-PBUH). We muslims do have greater respect for all God's messenger including Jesus.

    3. M. T. Dremer profile image94
      M. T. Dremerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      This is an example of unhealthy debate because you came out of the gate attacking atheists and non-believers.

    4. profile image60
      ctnahdaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Dear MT,my question are not attacking any beliefs,it is in general but specifically focused on interfaith discussion/issues.As I said,everyone entitled to his own opinion but at the end it is you who decide which part do you want to take or believe.

    5. M. T. Dremer profile image94
      M. T. Dremerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      ctnahda - Sorry for the confusion, I was referring to JTomp42's answer, as he likened atheists to a pack of wolves, for no apparent reason. There is nothing wrong with your original question or responses.

    6. profile image60
      ctnahdaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      MT,thank you for your clarification.Appreciate that.

  4. IDONO profile image79
    IDONOposted 4 years ago

    The key to this is to try not to judge another's beliefs as right or wrong, but just different. Then respect comes easy. This is where JThomp42  is lacking. He immediately went on the attack of Atheists exactly the same way he accused them of doing. This is not respect. This is the result of a staunch, dogmatic attitude. He is right. He has been there. So have I and some things never change.
         You can have this healthy dialogue with someone if you and the other person can be somewhat open-minded and not immediately go on the defense. You can't defend something that you cannot prove. This creates a stressed conversation that inevitably will turn into anger. That is counter constructive.

    1. profile image60
      ctnahdaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      For me,healthy Interfaith debate should not focus on differences only,but it should focus on the similarities and understanding differences without attacking others belief.At the end of the day, you yourselves who decide who do you want to be.

  5. lone77star profile image84
    lone77starposted 4 years ago

    A healthy Interfaith debate can only come when all parties let go of their egos.

    Ask questions. Don't belittle answers. Use love, first, then logic; but no logic without love.

    If the answer you receive is something you disagree with, then ask questions until you understand how the answer is real to the other person.

    The most difficult thing, though, is letting go of ego. Too many think ego is their true self, and that is entirely false. Ego is selfishness and separateness. If a person comes to a debate with these, then it starts with the disease of ego.

    But ego is a decision. I've seen atheists and believers with big egos, and I've seen both without egos. It can happen.

    In religion, spirituality, science, government, military and every other human activity, ego is an equal-opportunity destroyer. Ego is bias on steroids.

    I have been a Christian, a Scientologist, a Buddhist, a Jewish mystic and a Christian. I've also been a scientist with a degree summa cum laude, and someone who has performed miracles dozens of times. I've been a Hollywood artist with screen credit, a published author, an award-winning essayist and creator of 3D astronomy software (no small feat, that).

    My broad and varied experience could be valuable in such a debate. But I always endeavor to remain humble (imperfectly) and to learn more from others. Such learning becomes impossible, though, when those others think they know it all, or use pejorative labels to create separation (ego).

    Here's a couple of articles that show my attempts to find a higher ground on topics that are usually divisive. We can come together. Love really is the answer.

    http://www.thebibleshiddenwisdom.com/sc … ligion.php

    http://www.the-love-of-god.com/blog/bib … omination/

 
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