The New Ten Commandments

Jump to Last Post 1-17 of 17 discussions (28 posts)
  1. Marisa Wright profile image96
    Marisa Wrightposted 10 years ago

    This list has been suggested as an updated version of the Ten Commandments, suitable as a template for use by all, regardless of religion or faith. 

    1.  Do not do to others what you would not want them to do to you.

    2.  In all things strive to cause no harm.

    3.  Treat your fellow living things and the world in general with love, honesty, faithfulness and respect.

    4.  Do not overlook evil or shrink from administering justice, but always be ready to forgive wrongdoing freely admitted and honestly regretted.

    5. Live life with a sense of joy and wonder

    6.  Teach your children to think for themselves, even if it means disagreeing with you.

    7.  Test all things: always check your views against the facts, and be ready to discard them if they do not conform to the truth.

    8.  Never seek to censor or cut yourself off from dissent; always respect the right of others to disagree with you.

    9.  Do not allow yourself to be led blindly by others.

    10.  Value the future on a timescale longer than your own.

    What is your view?  Are they a good template for living?  What else would you include?

    1. mohitmisra profile image58
      mohitmisraposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      Very good.

      1. mohitmisra profile image58
        mohitmisraposted 10 years agoin reply to this

        Would also add -meditate regularly and find god.Bliss.

        1. Crash Jones profile image55
          Crash Jonesposted 10 years agoin reply to this

          Quit suggesting your way is THE WAY.

          1. Marisa Wright profile image96
            Marisa Wrightposted 10 years agoin reply to this

            Crash, the joke on Mohit is that he agrees with these commandments at all.

            They were taken from an atheist website.

            1. Crash Jones profile image55
              Crash Jonesposted 10 years agoin reply to this

              Ebon, yeah I smiled at my screen when he (inevitably) weighed in ... but, then again, I think MO would praise atheism if you described it without using the words atheism/atheist and god. He's so enlightened that everything, to him, is wonderful as long as you say it with happiness, joy or big words he doesn't know ... mostly the words he doesn't know part.

    2. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      works for me  smile

  2. Misha profile image71
    Mishaposted 10 years ago

    While I more or less agree to the most of the list, I have a problem with the first one.

    It is definitely better than not thinking about others at all, but it more or less works only under homogeneous cultural environment. As soon as you try to apply it in multi-cultural environment, it fails miserably.

    Better version IMHO would be "Do not do to others what they don't want to be done to them" smile

  3. Marisa Wright profile image96
    Marisa Wrightposted 10 years ago

    "Do as you would be done by" is a very old saying, and it means that you should put yourself in the other person's shoes.  You would never do anything to harm yourself, so it should always work.

    That said, I see how in some cases, I might find something quite acceptable whereas someone of another culture might find it unacceptable.  I guess that's what you're getting at, Misha.

  4. Mark Knowles profile image59
    Mark Knowlesposted 10 years ago

    I think what Misha is saying is that in different cultures, there are different standards as to what you might want done to you. And you should not apply those same standards to other cultures.

    A Masai warrior might want to be taken into the bush, be circumcised and left to fend for himself for two weeks when he reached puberty.

    But I wouldn't want that done to me, no matter the good intentions smile

  5. Inspirepub profile image75
    Inspirepubposted 10 years ago

    Even within a culture!

    When my husband is stressed, he wants everyone to leave him alone so he can watch television.

    When I am stressed, I want to talk about my stressors and be looked after and nurtured.

    If we practiced "do as you would be done by", we'd be divorced by now!

    Jenny

    P.S. And yes, it's a mongrel when something happens that stresses us both.

    Another vote for Misha's rewrite. I would go so far as to say "Find out how others want to be treated, and treat them that way, provided it doesn't conflict with any other commandment to do so."

  6. Misha profile image71
    Mishaposted 10 years ago

    Yep, that's exactly what I meant smile People may want to be treated differently than you think they are for a whole lot of different reasons, cultural environment being just one of them. smile

  7. funride profile image75
    funrideposted 10 years ago

    Hummmm...

    I´m "smelling" the birth of a new one: Hubalism! big_smile

    Until now I´m all forward wink. And I can see by the last posts that here we can make changes to the commandments for them to get better. For me those are 10 good ones and could/should be followed by all.

  8. SparklingJewel profile image74
    SparklingJewelposted 10 years ago

    You all are talking about the Golden Rule...not a commandment. right? I think half of what Marissa wrote out are covered under the Golden Rule...but it is good to get specific. smile

    Misha, how would anyone know what could bother someone else...how could anyone know what to ask about what bothers them...not a very realistic situation to expect that anyone could know what bothers another unless they started asking.

    It seems to me that is why doing the best you can, by not doing to someone what you know you would not like have done to you, is the only place to start. Then inform yourself the best you can about other cultures and people, then you learn about each other in relationships as they progress.

  9. Misha profile image71
    Mishaposted 10 years ago

    Jewel, sure, it is definitely a learning process. And necessary one at that, if one wants to follow the spirit of the original "do onto others..." rule and not only the letter of it smile

    Yes, we should start asking - and we should start telling. It makes things thousand times easier. smile

  10. Marisa Wright profile image96
    Marisa Wrightposted 10 years ago

    OK, so now the Ten Commandments look like this:

    1.  Find out how others want to be treated, and treat them that way, provided it doesn't conflict with any other commandment to do so

    2.  In all things strive to cause no harm.

    3.  Treat your fellow living things and the world in general with love, honesty, faithfulness and respect.

    4.  Do not overlook evil or shrink from administering justice, but always be ready to forgive wrongdoing freely admitted and honestly regretted.

    5. Live life with a sense of joy and wonder

    6.  Teach your children to think for themselves, even if it means disagreeing with you.

    7.  Test all things: always check your views against the facts, and be ready to discard them if they do not conform to the truth.

    8.  Never seek to censor or cut yourself off from dissent; always respect the right of others to disagree with you.

    9.  Do not allow yourself to be led blindly by others.

    10.  Value the future on a timescale longer than your own.

    Mohit suggests adding a new one - "Meditate regularly and find God".  I'd have to delete one to fit this one in.  Do others agree it should be included?  Which one do we lose?

    Any other suggestions?

    1. Eric Graudins profile image59
      Eric Graudinsposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      Update to:
      9. Do not allow yourself to be led blindly by others, especially if they have websites with large red headings, pictures of yachts, fast cars, and mansions, and a paypal button at the bottom.



      Why be boring and limit the list to 10 - just like everyone else does.
      Strike Out. Make a new brand.
      How about "The Eleven Commandments for Modern Life." and add Meditation as number 11. ?

      And maybe change it to "Meditate regularly and find A God".
      there's thousands from which to choose smile

  11. Crash Jones profile image55
    Crash Jonesposted 10 years ago

    Since I tend to shut down when given lists of rules, I'll try my own using the one posted here as a semi-guide:

    1) Treat others respectfully, unless they prove themselves fools. If they're fools, treat them according to your fancy.

    2) Do not murder, maim, disfigure or otherwise harm another individual, even if they are a fool.

    3) Spend your love, time and energy on all those who deserve it. Ignore or, if it helps you feel better, mock them.

    4) Be prepared recognize evil and fight it with zeal.

    5) Encourage children to think freely, live well and recognize and avoid fools.

    6) Keep an open mind, recognizing that others' opinions are sometimes valid and sometimes a waste of brain cells.

    7) Respect the right of others to disagree. Contemplate their arguments, yet understand that many people's opinions are useless.

    8) Understand that the world owes you nothing. It was here before you and will continue long after your existence.

    9) Tell the truth ... if you must.

    10) Ignore all rules, dictums and commandments that conflict with your own beliefs, faith, morality and common sense.

  12. Paraglider profile image92
    Paragliderposted 10 years ago

    My main issue with these latter-day commandments is that they are unmemorable, being written in bland and woffly fashionable language that will date very quickly. They're not crafted for permanence, however well-meant they may be.

  13. Marisa Wright profile image96
    Marisa Wrightposted 10 years ago

    That's a very good point, Paraglider.  I agree with them but there's nothing particularly exciting about them.

  14. Inspirepub profile image75
    Inspirepubposted 10 years ago

    Nothing can take the place of good old "Thou shalt not ..."

    Maybe you could redraft them in the negative?

    1. Paraglider profile image92
      Paragliderposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      There's a lot of sense in that. The old ten commandments allow for great personal freedom simply because they (largely) avoid telling you what to do. The effectively say do what you like as long as you don't do x, y & z.

    2. kerryg profile image85
      kerrygposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      The authors of the Bible also knew that sex and violence sell. smile

      EVERYBODY knows that thou shalt not kill or covet thy neighbor's wife. Who remembers all that boring stuff about keeping the sabbath?

  15. SparklingJewel profile image74
    SparklingJewelposted 10 years ago

    The ten commandments were originally drafted (IMHO) to inform  and warn people to obey the laws of the universe (God). You know, all the Energy that IS, works in particular ways and not in others (I mean the Energy gets used in ways that are not in harmony with the Original Intent), so things have gotten messed up and confusion has ruled.

    the rules that you have outlined go in line with good human conduct, but of course, lack, partially,significance with Original Intent of Harmony...sorry folks...can't get away from Truth as the focus on Original Intent (that is God). the Universe "works" in particular ways, period. And not in others.

    From my studies/meditations through the years the reason there is so much power of consciousness in the old ten commandments is that the souls that are eternal have been thinking and living them from the beginning of time...they are of the ethers, the planetary memory, the Spirit.    Repetition  creates power. For good, that's great; for evil that's not...because it is a misuse of the power of Original Intent.

  16. Misha profile image71
    Mishaposted 10 years ago

    And we forgot the cornerstone one - Judge not lest ya be judged smile Which make the most of the list obsolete tongue

    1. Paraglider profile image92
      Paragliderposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      Except that comes from the sermon on the mount and isn't part of the decalogue. I've always liked the sermon on the mount - it's about as useful and humane as religious teaching ever gets.

      I also like the version in Life of Brian - blessed are the cheesemakers . . .

      1. Inspirepub profile image75
        Inspirepubposted 10 years agoin reply to this

        I think it has been agreed that in this case, the cheesemakers are an example. Our Lord was, of course, referring to any worker in the dairy industry ....

        Jenny

  17. cjcs profile image58
    cjcsposted 10 years ago

    Be good to others; try to not be afraid.

    (All the rest is commentary. smile )

    CJ

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)