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don't you think it is ironic

  1. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
    tlmcgaa70posted 5 years ago

    that when 9/11 happened, people by the thousands rushed to buy bibles and packed the churches because they thought the end had come and they better get right with, or make peace with GOD? stores were sold out of bibles all across america, and i am sure in other countries to they made quite a profit off bibles.

    1. mischeviousme profile image60
      mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I do not think it is so much ironic, as collective insanity.

    2. lobobrandon profile image90
      lobobrandonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Did that happen?? I was too young to remember big_smile. I remember the attack but not the bible buying spree. What made them think its the end of the world?

    3. AshtonFirefly profile image79
      AshtonFireflyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If this were the case...(I don't remember the 9/11 incident too clearly) how would it be ironic?

    4. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, it's ironic.

    5. profile image48
      Jesus was a hippoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hahaha thats the first I heard of that. I find it hilarious.

    6. Cara.R profile image77
      Cara.Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If anyone made money it were the people who manufactured the American flag.

    7. Claire Evans profile image73
      Claire Evansposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That pisses me off.  God is only convenient when the "end is nigh".  Pathetic.

      1. Cassie Smith profile image69
        Cassie Smithposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        But it's what normally happens during Christmas and Easter.  People that don't normally go to church show up all of a sudden.

        1. Claire Evans profile image73
          Claire Evansposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          You are absolutely right.  I tend to be one of those people BUT I have a personal relationship with God that exists everyday.  There's a big difference.  A lot of people think that even if they go to church every Sunday it's enough.  It's not.

    8. A Troubled Man profile image59
      A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Really, so they made it about themselves instead of about the people who died. Sounds about right.

      1. Claire Evans profile image73
        Claire Evansposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I agree.

    9. profile image0
      Cranfordjsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It's very ironic since religion caused the attacks!

      Fight fire with fire, right?

      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/5983464_f248.jpg

      1. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
        tlmcgaa70posted 5 years agoin reply to this

        zooop! right over your head

        1. Castlepaloma profile image76
          Castlepalomaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          fight fire with nukes

        2. profile image0
          Cranfordjsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          @tlmcgaa70 Then please explain.

  2. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
    tlmcgaa70posted 5 years ago

    my point is that the majority of those rushing to fill churches and buy bibles were those professing to believe there is no god/GOD. what makes me think that? the fact that the majority of believers already own bibles and have no need to rush out and buy new ones. the majority of believers attend church, though there are many who do not. so if they dont believe in GOD why suddenly call on GOD to save them?

    1. mischeviousme profile image60
      mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have a collection of bibles and no one bible could make feel safe or believe in anything. To me they are just books and would not give me anymore security than a passifier. To me, religion does not matter and it will not cure any of my ills nor quell my fears.

      1. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
        tlmcgaa70posted 5 years agoin reply to this

        i am sorry for you then

        1. Castlepaloma profile image76
          Castlepalomaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          The aftershock and awe was worst

          1. USA made a new best friend with Brittan rather than Canada who dose more trade with USA than all of Europe combined.

          2. US killed One Million Iraqi even those no Iraqi were not on those crushing planes into the Twin Towers.

          North America and much of the world continues to go downhill greater than any other known event  since the Great depression Dirty 30s

        2. mischeviousme profile image60
          mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          You should not be sorry for me, for I have made my peace with God, I just chose to look beyond the world my eyes see. I have found God and that is all that matters, no book can lead you anywhere, for you must lead yourself while God walks beside. God has always been there, we have just not paid any attention and for those that have, we have but to respect them and their teachings.

      2. Quilligrapher profile image88
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Here’s hoping you are finding peace from following your bliss. It is sad that the only response you received was “i [sic] am sorry for you then” instead of “I understand.”

        Many of us believe that ultimate salvation depends on following God’s plan as revealed to humankind in the Holy Bible. However, our dilemma is that we follow “a Bible,” or perhaps “my Bible,” or maybe “a KJV Bible.” However, in reality, “The Bible,” the actual message from God to us, no longer exits.

        One reliable source indicates that there are 31,173 verses in the Old and New testaments of the Bible. (1) Another, lists over 100 existing English translations of just one verse in the New Testament, John 1:1. This roster is the work of countless scholars from a variety of religious groups over a period of 700 years, the oldest from around 1300 AD. (2)

        When we do the arithmetic, i.e. 31,173 verses, 101 different English translations, 389 living languages serving 94% of the world’s speakers (3), we learn there are potentially 1.2 billion different interpretations of God’s word.

        One of life’s challenges, with all due respect to those who believe without question, and at the risk of seeming facetious, is how to determine which versions are God’s versions and which should be ignored?

        (1) http://www.biblestudy101.org/Lists/statisticsHB.html
        (2) http://4witness.org/jehovahs_witness/john1_1trans.php
        (3) http://www.ethnologue.org/ethno_docs/di … sp?by=size

        1. AshtonFirefly profile image79
          AshtonFireflyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          "One of life’s challenges, with all due respect to those who believe without question, and at the risk of seeming facetious, is how to determine which versions are God’s versions and which should be ignored?"

          Maybe we should all learn the original languages and translate it ourselves...oh wait...we'd still have a gazillion different translations hmm or as many translations as there were people.
          Yes that puts Christians in quite the dilemma. Which one do you follow? It's all man-made. Regardless of what Christians want to say, the fact is, man decided which books were put into the Bible. Whether or not they were inspired was determined by man. If their "inspiration" were plainly obvious, the church of old would not have had long fights about which books should be included...

          1. mischeviousme profile image60
            mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            I agree. If the answers were absolutely what they were assumed to be, there would be no need or use for squabbling.

    2. profile image48
      Jesus was a hippoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thats a bit of an assumption on your part. Are you honestly saying that you think ALL believers own a bible?

      This is how I see it, if someone doesnt believe there is a god, then they wouldnt buy a bible.

      Put yourself in their shoes. You dont believe in vishnu do you, so would you go buy a copy of the ghita? Of course you wouldnt. Just like a non believer in christianity would not buy a bible.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image76
        Castlepalomaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        The Good news is Most of the third World population is doubling or Tripling North America’s economic growth

    3. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Actually, it would be those who were believers running out to buy an additional bible....you know an updated version. lol
      Answered above.
      Over 80% of America is religious in some capacity. Would you like to explain how 20% of the population cause such an increase in sales? Especially when 15% of the population is homeless and 15% of them are living in poverty(which means they would be lucky if they could spare them money to buy one).

      1. Kyle Payne profile image59
        Kyle Payneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Twenty percent of America would be around 61,401,310 people. That alone could easily raise the sales of Bibles, much more than what actually happened. Poverty as our nation defines it is wealthy in comparison with the rest of the world, our poverty stricken citizens could easily spare enough money to buy a 5 dollar Bible.  In addition to that, the 80% of America that is religious may not own a Bible. So a percentage could be taken from that 80% and added to the 20%. So the increase of sales is easily accounted for Cagsil.

        1. Cassie Smith profile image69
          Cassie Smithposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          You can get a free Bible from the Gideons.

          1. Kyle Payne profile image59
            Kyle Payneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Cassie, that does not apply to this though because we are discussing Bible sales.

    4. psycheskinner profile image83
      psycheskinnerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think it is ironic that you deem purchase of a Bible proof of atheism.

  3. Randy Godwin profile image95
    Randy Godwinposted 5 years ago

    Hmmmm. Gun and alcohol sales went up too.  What does this tell you?

  4. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    I don't live near ground zero. I worked with a few people who did, but we were all in different stages of shock. Who wouldn't have wanted, at that moment, to believe a higher power was watching and would sort it out. Would take the radicals who  sanctioned the violent attacks on innocent civilians and make them see their wrong, or make them pay.

    I don't know a soul who ran out and bought a Bible or went to church. I'll take your word for it that some did. I guess that was their way of attempting to find sense in the madness. I notice one poster calls that pathetic. Maybe it was, but it was a pathetic moment in the history of human interaction. I wouldn't begrudge anyone how they sought to cope with it.

    1. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
      tlmcgaa70posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      November 26, 2001
      (Ventura, CA) - Social analysts point out that people turn to religion in times of crisis and instability. The terrorist attacks on September 11 certainly shattered the stability and comfort of American's lives, leading to a surge in church attendance and Bible sales immediately after the attacks. But what is the lingering effect of the attack and continued tension on people's religious beliefs and practices? Those questions are answered with startling clarity in a new survey released by the Barna Research Group of Ventura, California. Using 21 indicators of the nation's spiritual climate, the study gives a comprehensive look at how people's faith has changed in the aftermath of the terrorist attack.


      The types of adults who seemed more inclined to be attending church services two months after the attack were women (up eight percentage points since August), people 55 or older (+10 points), Catholics (also up 10 points), and atheists, whose church participation tripled from just 3% in August to 10% in November.


      The other incredible shift was the decline in people who firmly reject the notion that "Satan, or the devil, is not a living being but is just a symbol of evil." The five-percentage point decline on this measure is not enormous by statistical standards, but it is quite meaningful in terms of people's general perspective on good and evil, and regarding the nature of spiritual conflict. This shift in theology was most common among women, atheists and Catholics.

      1. Druid Dude profile image62
        Druid Dudeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        That little obvious ploy won't work with the Big Kahuna

      2. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        This is in no way surprising; yet it also is pretty meaningless in the long run. I know from personal experience, when life has thrown me hard curve balls from out of no where; I tend to fall back into myself. I have looked to others for guidance on things that would normally be no brainers. Shock and/or emotional trauma can make us do some odd things.

        So, you've got an innocent nation who is assaulted in the most heinous manner imaginable. Everything we held dear...how we were taught to view foreigners living among us; our sense of fair play; our sense of compassion....it was all spit on in that one brief instant. By people we were told had lived among us for years. People who had a chance to get to know us. And they did this to us anyway.

        Of course it took time to come to grips with it. Of course the only way many could process it in the short run was to see it as a great cosmic battle.
        Because, it made no sense.

        But, the stupor of shock wore off and those people were able to find perspective and they were able to move on.

        I'm not sure believing in cosmic forces of evil helps any of us find solutions to the problems we are faced with in this world.

      3. A Troubled Man profile image59
        A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Do you have a source that isn't religiously biased like the Barna Group?

        1. Druid Dude profile image62
          Druid Dudeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          uhhh...Innocent Nation? How so? Where in history do you see that the U.S. is faultless in the cause of our problems. Revolting against a "GOD CHOSEN" King, so that MEN (White men) could do as they pleased, with slaves, women, and children. Conducting a genocidal plan against the indigenous people (Called Native Americans) forcing their will on foreign powers by using strong arm tactics and economic strangleholds. Using much needed medicines as aweapon of philosophy. Setting up a nation of refugees in their "own nation" while expecting the , again indigenous, people of the newly occupied territory to simply LIKE IT (See the history of the modern state of Israel, and the area which is known as Palestine...go all the way back to the ROMAN history of that area) We topple stable governments because WE DON"T LIKE'EM. Innocence? Your naivete amazes me.

          1. A Troubled Man profile image59
            A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Was there a point to that rant?

            1. profile image0
              Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              I think he was ranting at me.

          2. profile image0
            Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Just to clarify, because I think my remarks upset you. No government is innocent. Anyone who lays that claim would have a difficult time supporting it. The average citizens are innocent. They do not make policy. They do not know about back door deals.  They do not wage war. The citizens of the United States who were killed in terrorist attacks did nothing to the murderers who killed them. No more than the average Iraqi citizen deserved to die.

            You can be upset with American policy all day long, and I'll probably agree with you. Ram a plane into a building to kill civilians and I don't know what to call you except a murdering terrorist.

            1. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
              tlmcgaa70posted 5 years agoin reply to this

              well said Emile.

 
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