Is there any law to punish animals like Lion, Elephant and Bear injuring humans

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  1. wqaindia profile image46
    wqaindiaposted 5 years ago

    Is there any law to punish animals like Lion, Elephant and Bear injuring humans without provocation?

    Is there any law to punish animals like Lion, Elephant and Bear injuring humans without provocation? If human beings commit crimes there is law to punish them.

  2. MickS profile image70
    MickSposted 5 years ago

    In the Middle ages in England, it is suggested that wild animals were tried and punished for causing harm to mankind.  However, as I said, the Middle Ages, we have progressed since then, now people are responsible for the behaviour of their animals.  Whilst certain animals are hunted down if they become 'rogue', we are all expected to travel in wilderness areas, where the wild beasts roam, being mindful of our own safety.

    1. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are right, wild animals have the right to roam free in the forests and their earmarked area. I think it is also a punishment to remain under House Arrest.

  3. LCDWriter profile image94
    LCDWriterposted 5 years ago

    Animals rarely attack without provocation.  Even if it wasn't you, human activity such as feeding wild animals like alligators or bears, leads them to see people as a food source.

    Animals have no sense of right or wrong as people do.  They just "do."  So punishing them is not something that would work or make sense.

    Yes, if an animal becomes a threat to humans they are usually put down (or if they become rabid or sick in some other way). 

    We are a much bigger threat to animals than they are to us.  Humans are dangerous, self-centered creatures.

    1. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree wholeheartedly!

    2. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I do agree with all the members coming in favor of poor animals. Actually an elephant was allowed to released on bail of INR 15 lacs which provoked me to ask the question.

  4. keraladishes profile image61
    keraladishesposted 5 years ago

    Let the animals be in Forest and they wont harm any humans. The real culprits are humans who must be punished who torture them for money and the law should be made for caputuring animals from forest

    1. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hear hear!

  5. RonElFran profile image98
    RonElFranposted 5 years ago

    I don't know of any laws on the books concerning this, but there is certainly an unwritten law that any animal that attacks and kills a human is hunted down and killed. This seems to be the case even if the animal was provoked by the human. For example, cougars in the American west sometimes attack joggers. Obviously such an animal cannot be left alone to continue its career. Attacking a person is, for the animal, a capital offense.

    1. Insane Mundane profile image59
      Insane Mundaneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      LOL!  Really?  Dang, do you at least like sharks?

    2. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It's career? It's just trying to live. Perhaps people should not go into their habitat. We want to control everything. We need to back off and let animals live in the wild in peace before we wipe them out entirely.

  6. Chris Achilleos profile image77
    Chris Achilleosposted 5 years ago

    I don't thing there is such law or ever will, in fact there is a lot of animal cruelty carried out from humans which has been left unpunished. I don't believe that animals would attack people without being provoked. Animals can sense a persons fear, anger, or if you like soul. They can tell if there is a threat of any kind, whether a person is screaming or ready to attack them. 

    So if a person provokes an animal in any way it will attack. Provoking can be done by many ways, one is by being in their territory or by actually trying to harm them in attempt to protect your self. But if you are actually in places where these animals live, you should be aware of their existence and respect their space, do not get in their territory. Learn to accept and respect.

    The earth is pretty much the animal's home as well as ours, so as we wouldn't like to find a lion, elephant, or bear outside our door step, neither do these animals want to see us outside theirs.

    1. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Spot on! We need to accept animals have just as much right as we do to live peacefully on this planet and respect them.

  7. austinhealy profile image68
    austinhealyposted 5 years ago

    Considering carefully what human laws and regulations do to humanity as a whole, maybe we should leave those poor animals alone. Haven't we punished them enough by bringing them on the verge of extinction? Without provocation? Really? Never heard of safaris or slaughtering elephants for their tusks. Who's provoking who?

    1. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! Well put! A bizarre question if there ever was one!

    2. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Actually an elephant was allowed to released on bail of INR 15 lacs which provoked me to ask the question.

  8. Efficient Admin profile image93
    Efficient Adminposted 5 years ago

    I believe most authorities will put down an animal who has harmed a human. I don't guess wild animals know right from wrong like humans do and therefore they only kill for survival.

  9. tsadjatko profile image60
    tsadjatkoposted 5 years ago

    Many states or even municipalities have laws concerning dangerous animals for example in minnesota Under section 609.227, if a person is convicted of a dangerous animal violation under section 609.205, clause (4); or 609.226, subdivision 1, 2, or 3, the animal shall be seized and killed, and the convicted owner shall pay the cost of confining and killing the animal.

    It all depends, I guess, on where it occurs and the laws of the local jurisdiction but there are laws concernig this although I don't think these animals can get community service or probation - for the animal it's either life in prison or death, without a trial.

  10. Insane Mundane profile image59
    Insane Mundaneposted 5 years ago

    This is totally an asinine query!  My gawd!  What's next?  Is it okay to sue the pop-tarts that didn't come out of the toaster in a timely fashion?

    1. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I plan to take a pop tart to court next week for popping up too early smile

    2. Insane Mundane profile image59
      Insane Mundaneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hire a good lawyer, and you'll get a good pop; big_smile

  11. Seeker7 profile image94
    Seeker7posted 5 years ago

    Surely you only 'punish' where there is intelligence and conscious understanding of actions carried out? Animals don't have that capability. So no, there shouldn't be any punishment. They are programmed by nature to act as they do - by instinct. They don't go around deliberately looking to harm people, in fact most species prefer to stay out of our way.

    Most Animals will only attack for a very few reasons - protection of young, when they are very hungry, to protect themselves. Yes you will get other reasons on occasion, such as a rougue, but even then you can usually trace the route cause back to people.

    We're suppose to be the most intelligent species on earth, if more people would use their intelligence as well as a good dose of common sense, then many of the attacks that take place wouldn't happen. If we as a species continue to push into wild territories, go on holiday there etc. then we have to accept that there are going to be dangers. There are many communities of people all over the world who do live quite happily with the wild life that is around and this is because they use their brains and their common sense - in addition, they also have respect for nature.

    1. Peanutritious profile image60
      Peanutritiousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      well said, I couldn't agree more!

    2. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Convincing..

  12. JKenny profile image94
    JKennyposted 5 years ago

    There are laws that make domestic/caged animals culpable due to the fact they are somebody's property. But nothing in relation to wild animals because laws only cover people and their property. I have read articles that ask whether non-human apes and dolphins should be redefined as people in a legal sense, due to their high level of intelligence

    1. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Only a day before yesterday, Chandigarh, called the city beautiful, residents hired Langoors to keep away Monkey menace by paying rent per day as we pay to watch and ward staff. I agree with you that non human apes need to be redefined.

    2. SidKemp profile image91
      SidKempposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      We need to take high intelligence into account. But I don't know if it works to redefine them as human. In any democratic society, all humans have the right to vote and cannot be legally owned by another human beings. Can that work?

  13. SidKemp profile image91
    SidKempposted 5 years ago

    Here is another perspective that matches all the other comments in terms of the facts.

    Is the purpose of the law - even for people - to punish? Or is it to prevent, to protect victims, and to guide and rehabilitate?

    Does any animal or person ever do anything without provocation.

    Laws do call for animals to be put to death if they appear to injure people (and sometimes even other animals) in a vicious way. But the purpose is more preventative than punishing.

    There are laws that punish owners of animals for allowing animals to do harmful things. And those laws are preventative, protective, punitative, and rehabilitative, at least in intention.

    Taking a deep look at the nature of intention, viciousness, and provocation is very important in the development of society and laws, for people and for animals.

    When Michael Vick's sentence included using his illegal earnings from dog fighting to rehabilitate dogs that usually would have been put down, we learned two things. First, with dogs, rehabilitation is almost always possible. Second, it is very expensive - on the order of a million dollars per dog. (See my hub, Football Player Vic Rescues Dog, here: http://hub.me/ad5vt .)

    Laws and punishment are a last resort. When people learn to care for and respect ourselves and each other, animals can be a wonderful part of our lives.

    1. Insane Mundane profile image59
      Insane Mundaneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ...Or as they say, let the animals wipe their selves out; god willing...

  14. Peanutritious profile image60
    Peanutritiousposted 5 years ago

    Is this a serious question? I can hardly believe i'm reading this. It's us that should be punished for interfering with Animals. They should be left alone in the wild.
    What do you mean 'without provocation'? We take them from their natural habitat, we hunt them, we make them perform in Circuses, We cage them and make them do what WE want them to do for our own gratification and entertainment.
    Animals have no voice and are abused by us for that reason. If an animal attacks, there's usually a damn good reason why!
    If we left them alone and stopped trying to control them there would be no trouble whatsoever.

    1. Insane Mundane profile image59
      Insane Mundaneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Amen!

    2. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Question was put because an elephant in an Asian Country was freed on BAIL . http://news.softpedia.com/news/Elephant … 7005.shtml

    3. Mazzy Bolero profile image76
      Mazzy Boleroposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I remember a case a few years ago in Nigeria when they arrested a goat! They said a thief had run away, the police chased him and couldn't find him, but found a goat in the street he had run down - so they decided he had turned himself into a goat!!

    4. SidKemp profile image91
      SidKempposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If the goat turned back into a man in the jail, I might believe the story. (There's a hilarious scene in the fantasy novel The Grey Horse. You see, he's about to be gelded . . .)

    5. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If you come across a news headline that an elephant is released by court orders on bail. Wouldn't you take it seriously.

  15. Mazzy Bolero profile image76
    Mazzy Boleroposted 5 years ago

    Not any more there isn't, but in the Middle Ages they put animals on trial as if they were humans, and even assigned them with attorneys! I wrote a hub on this called "Animals on Trial in Medieval Europe" so if you're interested, give it a look.  I find it amazing that people could seriously put rats and insects on trial and attribute human motives to pigs.  However, we probably think some crazy things too and people in later times will be laughing at us.

    1. wqaindia profile image46
      wqaindiaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are right .  Why in later times I have become a laughing stock even today . Anyhow laughter is best medicine. But the other day I found a question where do the the mosquitoes go after death - to heaven or hell.

  16. wqaindia profile image46
    wqaindiaposted 5 years ago

    Story that an elephant was released by court of law on Bail - originated the question.
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Elephant … 7005.shtml

 
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