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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (14 posts)

What is the worst trait a boss/supervisor can have?

  1. davidlivermore profile image97
    davidlivermoreposted 5 years ago

    What is the worst trait a boss/supervisor can have?

    As a supervisor myself, I find the worst trait I have is lack of sympathy.  I try to care about my staff members problems, but sometimes I don't because I feel they over-exaggerated the situation.  What do you feel is the worst trait a boss or supervisor can have?

  2. Paul Maplesden profile image71
    Paul Maplesdenposted 5 years ago

    Not listening to others; as a boss, you have to be open-minded and understand where your employees are coming from so you can address their concerns empower them and trust them to do their job well.

    1. davidlivermore profile image97
      davidlivermoreposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's a good point.  I've had supervisors who wouldn't listen before, or who would easily get offended by suggestions made.  Those situations taught me how I shouldn't act when I became a supervisor.

  3. mackyi profile image66
    mackyiposted 5 years ago

    One of the worst traits a supervisor could have is to indulge in the habit of caring only about the quality of work his/her staff can produce, and not about the workers as humans. Some people are even in a stoke deficit - they are longing to receive a positive stroke from their boss(ie. A simple thank you for a job well done or for being a team player etc).

    1. davidlivermore profile image97
      davidlivermoreposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I find I can be guilty of this from time to time.  I used to be really bad about it, but I have improved and offer praise when it's deserved.  I find fake praise or praising "just because" can be disastrous as well.

    2. mackyi profile image66
      mackyiposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      We should always try to be honest and true in everything we do. Do unto to others as you would like them do to you. I thought you would have interpreted  what I have to say as something genuine! Give a genuine praise when he/she truly deserves it.

    3. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      This supervisor is called a 9:1 supervisor according to theoretical books on supervisory types.  This supervisor cares more about technical work performance than he/she does the human content of the work place.  This supervisor is simply business.

  4. PegCole17 profile image95
    PegCole17posted 5 years ago

    I was a Purchasing supervisor for a company that employed 80,000 people worldwide. I had 23 managers over a period of 13 years with that company. One of the most frustrating traits that I experienced was when bosses showed favoritism.

    Sometimes it comes in the form of gender favoritism and other times they reveal their sympathies lie in favor of employees who have children. One woman boss confided that she promoted my peer rather than me because, "He was a single Dad and had to support a child." To me, a promotion should be based on merit rather than parenthood. Either way, it serves to demoralize those who are not considered the favorite.

    1. davidlivermore profile image97
      davidlivermoreposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It can be very hard to remain partial, as much as you try.  Supervisors can have favorite employees based on the work they do.  But most good supervisors try to be fair.  As far as they can, at least.

    2. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Supervisors DO have FAVORITE employees.  This is PAR for the course in the workplace. However, some supervisors give their favorite employees quarters that they DON'T give other employees.  Many times, an employee is promoted because of favoritism.

  5. profile image47
    Wilbart26posted 5 years ago

    Being too bossy, insensitive and a know it all guy. Someone who never listens to suggestions of anyone with a lower rank to him/her. Don't know how to praise the workers and just shout and shout and shout the whole day.

    1. davidlivermore profile image97
      davidlivermoreposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds like you had some bad supervisors.

    2. profile image47
      Wilbart26posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yep, and that resulted in me resigning for the position. I worked for them as an HR officer 2, and then they just ignore what I tell them and what is needed for the company, they focus more on profits. It's not the type of working environment for me.

  6. profile image0
    athurionposted 5 years ago

    I believe the worst trait a boss can have is "Self centered".

 
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