Is it possible to make a living by writing on hubpages?

Jump to Last Post 1-17 of 17 discussions (69 posts)
  1. JanisaChatte profile image92
    JanisaChatteposted 23 months ago

    Hi,
    How feasible is it to earn 500$ + monthly from writing on hubpages?
    Is it possible from ad revenue alone? Or how should one go about mastering amazon links? (I've never had much luck with that aspect)

    Any tips/suggestions?
    I enjoy writing and my favorite niches are food, gardening, travel and languages/teaching

    1. renegadetory profile image61
      renegadetoryposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      Does anyone here remember when HubPages ran some kind of internship years and years ago?

      They paid people pretty decent money ($500 a week I think or maybe it was a month) to write but they had to write a certain amount of hubs per week and there was limited spaces too.

      I wish they'd bring something like that back again.

      1. theraggededge profile image96
        theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        It was the Apprentice Program. They didn't pay anything like that big_smile It was about $6 per hub and you had to publish a minimum of, I think, four a month. and you'd get paid for a maximum of ten. So $60 pm.

        It was a great program though, and I still have well-performing articles from that time.

        1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
          PaulGoodman67posted 23 months agoin reply to this

          I agree (except for the bit about it being great). They paid a few dollars per hub. It was barely worth it. I was chosen and earned an extra $30-something per month for a time, before I pretty much lost interest. I felt like a hack.

          It was counterproductive. It was meant to create a lot of high quality hubs in the aftermath of Google Panda, but the temptation for writers on it was to just churn out articles, regardless of quality.

          Plus the scheme alienated people who weren't invited to be on it and caused friction when the secret got out (we were supposed to be sworn to secrecy).

          Medium had a temporary .bonus scheme (they've tried just about everything) last year where they paid the top few percentage of writers between $100 and $500, but that lasted only for three or four months.

          While I obviously don't object to receiving bonus payments for work that I'm doing anyway, it'd still be better for HP to find a way to raise CPMs and views in my opinion.

          1. EricDockett profile image96
            EricDockettposted 23 months agoin reply to this

            I was invited to that on my original account. Now I can see why it may have frustrated some long-time writers. At time, it made a big difference to me.

            The extra money was nice and it helped me hit payout much sooner, but just being asked to participate in it gave me a boost of confidence when I first started out. That, along with getting nominated for  bunch of Hub Nuggets and winning two or three, plus a few Hub of the Days in my first year.

            These are things new writers don't experience. There is a lot more stick and a lot less carrot these days. Ten years and 36 million views later, I sometimes wonder if I would have made it this far if it weren't for the positive reinforcement back then.

            I believe a lot of the content in the Learning Center was created for the Apprentice Program. It gave us new writers a head start and forced us to study. This is one of the reasons I think it is so important to spend a lot of time in the Learning Center. I know it helped me.

        2. renegadetory profile image61
          renegadetoryposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          I wonder where I got the $500 from?? 

          Yes, the Apprentice Program, that sounds familiar.

          I just remember that although I wasn't invited and didn't participate, it did motivate me to write more Hubs at the time.

          1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
            PaulGoodman67posted 23 months agoin reply to this

            People who weren't invited thought that we were earning a lot more than we actually were. I saw that in the forums at the time.

            It was really more like being bought a cup of coffee or a beer for half a day's work.

            I think the greater emphasis on quality rather than quantity nowadays is a good thing. The "content farm" approach was unsustainable.

            1. EricDockett profile image96
              EricDockettposted 23 months agoin reply to this

              It seemed like at the time they were trying to encourage us to be better writers, and find ways to get the community to learn.

              Now, they rely more on the editors to straighten things out. The editing thing obviously has worked, but I often think it would be in HP's best interest to concentrate more on education. It could mean less work for the editors and better content in the long run.

              1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
                PaulGoodman67posted 23 months agoin reply to this

                For sure, Google scuttled the original vision for the site.

                Early on, the site wasn't penalized for low quality writing, so they could just focus on education and help for writers.

                The penalization started with the Panda and Penguin updates and then just got more and more intense. Then they couldn't afford to allow the site to be an open platform anymore, had to introduce restrictions and do lots of in-house editing.

                Nowadays, even if the site has lots of good material, any crap they allow through brings down the whole thing. They can't really afford to let people learn on the job in the same way.

                All that said, I do miss the enthusiasm of people like Paul and Simone.

                When I watched a YouTube video from the earlier days, it did make me long for some of that positive energy.

                Nowadays, we literally get an average of one official announcement per year and there's less of an active rapport happening.

            2. Ben716 profile image89
              Ben716posted 23 months agoin reply to this

              I wasn't invited. Got me questioning which criteria was used to select hubbers for the program. I was like...okay...and left it at that.
              I heard of the program back then in the forum, and possibly on the Hubpages weekly email.

              1. theraggededge profile image96
                theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

                You had to apply for it and then wait to see if you'd been selected.

                1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
                  PaulGoodman67posted 23 months agoin reply to this

                  True, but I don't think everyone was invited to apply. That was why we were sworn to secrecy and there was a commotion when it all came out.

                  I don't know what the criteria for being invited was.

                2. Ben716 profile image89
                  Ben716posted 23 months agoin reply to this

                  Oh, my bad! Wish I knew back then one had to apply. I would have improved greatly back then on my writing and English.
                  My English at that time was pitiable (mediocre at best).
                  At least I'm not as bad as when I started writing, commercially.

      2. Kenna McHugh profile image91
        Kenna McHughposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        I was a part of the original program, $10.00 an article, with an editor who worked closely with you. Those articles did great for some time and petered out.

        1. theraggededge profile image96
          theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          Just checked my journal from 2012. We got $6.09 per hub.

          Having said that, I wasn't in the first batch of apprentices, and I don't remember an individual editor but group sessions. They also suggested titles, and some of them still do well for me.

          It was a really good program. Shame they didn't keep it going.

          1. Kenna McHugh profile image91
            Kenna McHughposted 23 months agoin reply to this

            I think I came on board at the start of HP with the $10.00 per article and personal editor. There weren't any group sessions, only one-on-one. The setup didn't last long, but those articles did great.

            Yes. It is a shame HP didn't keep either program going.

    2. Kenna McHugh profile image91
      Kenna McHughposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      It takes a lot of work and understanding of how Google works. It also takes time working with the editors because lately, my feedback is personal, but some corrections they suggest don't apply to my article. For example, one editor told me not to bold my content. The article didn't have any bolding. I never bold my words. So, you must email the editor and point that out to get to the niche. The work is not just the writing and Google. It's also willing to work with the editors, which takes time.

  2. renegadetory profile image61
    renegadetoryposted 23 months ago

    I've been wondering about this myself.  I know it's described as a way to make a little money writing about your hobbies or your interests, but I have thought about it as well. 

    I'm looking forward to reading the responses.

  3. DrMark1961 profile image95
    DrMark1961posted 23 months ago

    HP discourages people from thinking that they can earn a decent income here but it is definitely possible. You do need to work at it, maybe as much as a full time job, but it can pay off eventually. No, you will not need to worry about Amazon much since with the terrible payments from them now it will only earn you an extra few dollars a day.

    The first thing you need to do is study SEO. https://backlinko.com/google-ranking-factors There are things in this article that we cannot change but you need to do many of them so that your page has a good ranking with search engines. That is the only way you are going to earn well here.

    You will also need to write more articles and utilize those SEO techniques. You may be able to earn well from just a few articles but most people need to publish more to find out what is going to work.

    Creative writing does not usually earn much, so think about what you are interested in and check Ask the People, Ubersuggest, and Google suggest to find out what people are asking about that topic. (For instance on your article on easy to grow flowers you need to answer all the questions people ask, like "Which plant grows the fastest".)

    1. JanisaChatte profile image92
      JanisaChatteposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      I know a bit about SEO, but it's something I definitely need to learn more about.
      I currently have a few articles that tend to get a bit more views (compared to some of my other ones), but the total is still between 100-150 views per day (for all of the articles)

      Thank you for the suggestions!

    2. profile image0
      savvydatingposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      Dr. Mark,

      Very generous, useful suggestions for everyone. Thank you.

  4. FatFreddysCat profile image92
    FatFreddysCatposted 23 months ago

    I wish it were, cuz I'm gonna be out of a job come August 1st (shrug)

    ...but in my experience, it's been mainly beer and pizza money every few months.

  5. JNalbach419 profile image88
    JNalbach419posted 23 months ago

    You need to write ALOT of articles to make a decent amount of money. Not just ALOT but they all need to be featured articles that get a decent amount of traffic. I’ve written like 20 articles I think, most of them are featured but only a select few get a decent amount of views. Discussing how much money you make is discouraged among admins. It’s something we’re not supposed to talk about I suppose. I’ve written through hubpages for about 10 years I believe, but I post articles very infrequently. I’ve always wanted to make a living here too, sat at home and pushed out articles. But like I said, the articles need to be very good, commonly searched to get the views. Some of the things I thought would get traffic do not. So instead, like many writers here, I just write for enjoyment. However there are some writers who do make a living here, although they have TONS of very good articles beyond my expertise. Like Drs, and experts. There is the anomaly where I know a young lady was saying a recipe she wrote went viral and she made thousands overnight! You just gotta do it because you like it, and maybe the money will come maybe it will not. As far as Amazon links go, the editors here typically remove Amazon links unless you are actually writing a review on one specific thing you bought off of Amazon. Like you have to write at least 500 words in order to post a link to said product. But anyways, just write if you enjoy it. Don’t expect anything from it, but if it happens, that’s great! Good luck to you.

  6. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
    PaulGoodman67posted 23 months ago

    I agree with all that Dr Mark said, except for one thing: I think it's actually difficult to make any substantial amount on HP without at least part of it coming from Amazon income.

  7. Kain 360 profile image91
    Kain 360posted 23 months ago

    I used to make a little over that per per month on Hubpages on a different account. I had articles that basically went viral. It was one of the greatest times of my life because I was getting over 10,000 views a day and had an article that was #1 on the first page of Google for many keywords. I think they were some of the biggest videogame fantasy game articles on the internet for a while. That obviously increased my confidence. I had been writing for over 2 years with little success. I look back at the time fondly, but I am also frustrated because I've never seen the same level of success.

    Of course, I was writing on Hubpages before the niche sites existed. I also think my success was partially due to the implementation of the HP earning program. I never made much from Adsense (which is gone now).

    Unfortunately, Google Algorithms affected my traffic and earnings. The time period I'm talking about is around 2011-2012.

    I feel kind of guilty for not working on more articles over the years. I probably could have written 100-200+ more hubs, but the fear of failure deeply affected me. I've done content for other websites, but it was basically ghost writing. Somewhat unrelated, but I want to become a published fantasy author some day.

    The best way to get good traffic is writing as many 800-1500 word (about) articles as possible on at least several niches

    5,000-20,000 views per day would generate a decent income if CPM is at least average or higher. 100 hubs getting 100 views would be 10,000 views a day. That's a basic example, for it's rarely that simple. You could have 10 hubs that get 1 view per day, but have 1-2 hubs that get 1000 a day. I have seen this personally before.

    Focus on getting hubs featured and published on the niche websites. Use good grammar, spelling, punctuation etc. Write information that people might be searching for on google or other search engines. Stay as relevant as possible and use key word phrases in your paragraphs, but try to do it organically without the content sounding strange.

    Most people on HP don't do well because they sign up to the site, write a few hubs, then they quit and move on to other things. I think the people who are successful here (or in the past) stuck with it and never gave up.

    There are always obstacles when you work towards something. And that's when you either quit or continue on. Overcome that obstacle on route to your goal because you never know which is the last obstacle that's going to stop you. And if you stop, that could have been the last obstacle on route to success.

    1. DrMark1961 profile image95
      DrMark1961posted 23 months agoin reply to this

      According to search engine journal the AVERAGE word count to be on the front page is 1500, and another source I read said to be at the top of the page the average is 1700.
      An 800 word article may have worked many years ago but it seems like Google no longer ranks them very well.

      1. Kain 360 profile image91
        Kain 360posted 23 months agoin reply to this

        Really? I don't know much about that data. All I know is that I aim for at least 1000 words, but the word count often goes over naturally.

        One of my best performing hubs is about 1200-1300 and the other is closer to 900. My biggest hub is close to 1800 words. Some hubs have been doing well for years, while others never take off at all.

        I think my hubs from early 2010s were shorter -- like 600-800 words. I'm not 100% sure, though. Of course, I wrote a lot of them.

        1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
          PaulGoodman67posted 23 months agoin reply to this

          I'm sure Dr Mark is right about the overall mean average, but specific cases are more complicated, as it depends on the particular keyword(s) being chased.

          If you are chasing a low value keyword in a relatively obscure topic area then you will generally need less words to top the SERPs. You can get away with maybe a 1,000 or less because there's less competition.

          If you're in a competitive topic area chasing high value keyword(s) then you can end up writing a lot more words, tending towards 2,000 just to stand a chance.

          That's how I'd say it is.

          In general, the stiffer the competition, the more you need to write. As the overall competition has tended to get tougher over the years, the overall average wordage has increased (which is what Dr Mark is saying).

          1. DrMark1961 profile image95
            DrMark1961posted 23 months agoin reply to this

            I just finished publishing an article on the feline oral microbiome and it is less than 1000 words since there is hardly anything written on the subject.I am sure it is going to be on the front page but it probably will not be in 5 years when there are a lot more sites that have published on the issue. So, if you do write a shorter article, I think you have to check it all the time to see if the competition is causing it to move off of the front page.

        2. DrMark1961 profile image95
          DrMark1961posted 23 months agoin reply to this

          Those figures are averages so I think it is fine to do more, as one of the other that Google uses is an evaluation to see if you used all of the words related to the subject (LSI).
          I do not think it is okay to do much less. I had a lot of them 10 years ago, and they did fine, but there is a lot more competition now than back then and the articles have to contain a lot more.

    2. TessSchlesinger profile image60
      TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      I had the same experience - 2011/12 I think. Under a different name. Hubpages has changed a lot since then.

  8. theraggededge profile image96
    theraggededgeposted 23 months ago

    I have earned over $1k a couple of times, but not in the last two years. $500 per month is doable, with a bit of effort. Takes time to build up from zero though.

    1. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
      Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      How many articles do you think it takes to consistently get $100 per month?

      1. theraggededge profile image96
        theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        Impossible to say. It depends on the topic, the traffic to the article (SEO) and how long the readers stay on the page (impressions).

        If a writer focuses on a saturated topic, they have to produce unique and in-depth articles to rise above the 'noise'.

        I have about a dozen articles that bring in the bulk of my earnings, but the others all contribute to the total.

  9. Ben716 profile image89
    Ben716posted 23 months ago

    It mostly depends, but yes, people are making a full-time earning from Hubpages.
    I joined Hubpages in 2008. Got serious writing for Hubpages in 2015. Started earning a monthly payout in 2018 when niche sites were created (save for a few months in 2020 and last year).
    I quit my full-time job as a teacher due to delayed payment, and lack of being paid. Worked on re-editing published articles, and creating new ones. While I haven't hit the average earning I'm anticipating, I am somehow getting close to that target.
    I think for hubbers who are from developing countries benefit much from writing for Hubpages due to the high value of dollars against their local currency.
    I am from Africa, and thus converting dollars to my currency, Kenya shillings, works on my favour. The current exchange rate is 1 dollar = 118.60. So, if I am earning $100 a month from Hubpages, it equals to KSHS. 11,870. That is the amount a lower-level teacher gets.
    It's only that I haven't put a lot of effort in my writing. If I did, I would possibly be close to earning $200.
    I know in USA, a $50 is not much but for those in developing countries, it means a lot.

  10. TessSchlesinger profile image60
    TessSchlesingerposted 23 months ago

    My opinion, for what it's worth, is no. Sites come and go. They pay a lot for a while, and then they disappear or are absorbed by other sites. I don't think writers will be earning that much on a consistent basis for very much longer. I think that those who are still earning it will see their income degrade in the medium to longer term

    I also think that it's difficult, in general,  to earn money as a writer,and that those who do got lucky.

    My best input is to invest in multiple sites, and this will take a number of years. I also think it's important to do different styles of writing.

    I have removed most of my stories from Hubpages because I simply don't like a lot of things about the site, but that's another story.

    1. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
      Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      Which sites do you recommend writing for?

      1. TessSchlesinger profile image60
        TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        There's precious little going at the moment. Medium has just had a change of CEO. The guy who is heading it now has a self-help magazine, and it's possible that that is where the money will be.

        There's vocal media, and they pay bonuses, but, like Medium, they use Stripe for payment.

        You can also write on Patreon and Ko-fi and get a market there. All of it takes work and luck.

        1. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
          Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          Thank you for the suggestions. The downside with writing on Medium and vocal media is that their payment method is stripe.

          Stripe is not available in my country (South Africa). That's why at the moment HP is the best alternative for me.

          I only write on medium for affiliate marketing because the articles rank well on google (only for a short period of time).

          1. TessSchlesinger profile image60
            TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

            You can try Patreon. That works. When I was living in South Africa, my sister paid for me to go to London to reactivate my Stripe account, connect it to my Britsh bank account, and that's how I was able to earn on Medium even when I live in South Africa.

            However, Patreon pays to paypal, so I received money from Patreon. Patreon is a site where people pay you a monthly amount to support your art. It has a blogging site for writers, so you can write there. Perhaps, you might like to start writing there as well, and see if there are people who will contribute to you?

            I take home between $350 to $420 every month on Patreon. It comes and goes because people come and go. However, it is a steady income, and I am greatful for it. In South Africa, it was an awesome help.

            1. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
              Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

              I'll have a look into Patreon. Is your Patreon audience organic (like HP) or do you need to have a social media following?

              1. TessSchlesinger profile image60
                TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

                I had people on Google Plus where I wasn't paid asking me to open an account so that they could pay me a monthly amount. I don't really actively ask people to donate monthly. Most people who give me a monthly donation looked for me. I have had a notice at the end of my articles for about 9 months giving my Ko-fi link and Patreon link, and, I made a lot of money through that.

                However, that is not going to happen for everybody.

                I just remembered, you can chose to use paypal on Ko-fi. i think Ko-fi would be better for you.

  11. Solaras profile image95
    Solarasposted 23 months ago

    To answer the original question, it depends on where you live.  If you are in the USA or EU, then I doubt you can make enough to live on.  You would need 300+ high performing articles on high CPM topics to do that. 

    Now that we don't even know what our percentage is after mysterious costs, it is impossible to say what kind of earnings can be had here.

    If you live in a country with a very low cost of living, you may be able to survive on your earnings at HP.  But I would not make that a life plan, since they are keeping our earnings agreement a secret.

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image60
      TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      ++

      1. Abid Taga profile image62
        Abid Tagaposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        Tess, how we can earn from patreon. Give us some tips.

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image60
          TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          Patreon is a site where people support you for your writing. They must live your writing and want to read more of it. I have no idea how one gets Patrons. When I was on Google Plus, people used to love what I wrote, and because I didn't get paid, several people asked me to open an account on patreon, so I did.

          They then started paying me a monthly donation.

          I don't write on Patreon - other people do. Some earn $25K per month. They write thriller stories, fantasy, etc. and people pay them a monthly fee to carry on reading the series. I'm going to start a series when I'm finished my novel.

          Ko-fi gives one more options because people willd onate once off. Patreon only allows monthly payments.

          The one thing is this: People have to absolutely love what you do. They must want to read everything you write.

  12. bhattuc profile image79
    bhattucposted 23 months ago

    May be that was possible earlier but today I do not think that one can make money here. Most of us are not making it and if at all making then it is hardly $1-2 per month.
    There might be some exceptional writers who are getting good views for their niche articles and are getting payments from time to time.

    1. Abid Taga profile image62
      Abid Tagaposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      I want to work on it with Mehandi Nich and post my videos. What do you say about it? Can I make 50 dollars in a month on Patreon?

    2. theraggededge profile image96
      theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      You are incorrect, bhattuc. Many writers here still earn several hundred dollars, and, in some rare cases, thousands, at HubPages.

      If I didn't reach payout in the first few days of the month, I would be disappointed.

      I am certainly not exceptional.

      1. Abid Taga profile image62
        Abid Tagaposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        Theraggededge, I want to post videos on Patreon. I think it is good. What is your point of view about it?

        I'm not going to create an account on it.I want to accumulate knowledge about it first, then I will decide about work.

        Share your ideas about it.

        1. theraggededge profile image96
          theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          I've no idea. I don't use it. Not sure why you think I do.

          This thread isn't about Patreon, it's about earning at HubPages.

          Edit: maybe you need to switch to Chronological at the top of the page. You'll find the posts less confusing.

      2. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
        Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        It's really amazing that you can reach your payout in a few days.

        How long did it take before you started reaching your payout every month consistently .

        1. theraggededge profile image96
          theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          Can't remember. It was probably after being part of the Apprentice Program - 2012-ish I hadn't been writing seriously on HP before that.

      3. TessSchlesinger profile image60
        TessSchlesingerposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        In fariness, you started 12 years ago, and that has a lot to do with it.

        1. theraggededge profile image96
          theraggededgeposted 23 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, but I stopped writing for three years and haven't written anything much in the last two. I've been lucky with Google smile

          1. DrMark1961 profile image95
            DrMark1961posted 23 months agoin reply to this

            Years from now we will probably be reading "You are so fortunate though because you started back in 2020 (or 2021, or 2022, etc.) I can remember thinking "wow those people that started in 2008 were so much better off."

            1. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
              Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

              That's 100% true. Let's just hope HP will still be alive and strong in a few years.

              1. DrMark1961 profile image95
                DrMark1961posted 23 months agoin reply to this

                It took me about 5 years to start making a decent income from this site. Back when I started there were all sorts of doomsayers on the forums predicting the imminent demise of Hubpages.
                The same thing happened a year later, but with new doomsayers.
                And the next year, and the next year, and....

                I certainly cannot say if this site will still be here in 10 years, but based on my experience here I have seen that they are willing to change so that they do not go under.

                1. Justice Ndlovu profile image81
                  Justice Ndlovuposted 23 months agoin reply to this

                  I'm definitely optimistic about the grow of this website but I've noticed something weird.

                  People are saying that HP is not going anywhere but I had a look on SimilarWeb and it shows that the overall traffic on HP has been dropping steadily over the last few months. This is also the same on Medium.

                  From January to June the HP traffic has dropped from 2.15M - 1.53M

                  What do you think is causing this?
                  https://hubstatic.com/16093408.png

                  1. DrMark1961 profile image95
                    DrMark1961posted 23 months agoin reply to this

                    Yes, but go to your feed and list the niche sites that have been started by HP. Take all of them, do the same search, and then add up all of those numbers. (include discover.hubpages on there). That is a true sign of how much traffic this site has, not traffic to HP main site. The main site is where the articles reside that are not good enough/appropriate for a niche site.

                    I have not done this since I only keep track of traffic to one niche site, that where all of my articles are posted. Months ago traffic was 3 million per month but it is now close to 9.

                    There are still a lot of questions on how they are dividing the revenue, as Solaras has pointed out. As far as traffic, though, and earnings for the company that hosts this site, I do not see that there are any problems.

  13. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
    PaulGoodman67posted 23 months ago

    The bottom line is that you CAN potentially earn $500+ per month here. The more pertinent question, however, is whether that's actually worth it for you, because the likelihood is that you will have to do HubPages as a full time job to get to that point quickly.

    This will still likely take you over a year to achieve. $500/month only equals around $3/hour, assuming a 40 hour week. You can earn much more than that just flipping burgers in the US or Europe. $500/month is also nowhere near enough money to live off.

    For must people, it's better to approach HP revenue as supplementary income and build up a stock of articles gradually. Alongside the actual writing, you will also need to do a lot of learning about things like how search engines work.

    The other thing is to understand is that the the internet world goes up, down, and all around. It's very insecure. Most of the experienced writers here are hoping for a return to better days for the site.

  14. Abby Slutsky profile image92
    Abby Slutskyposted 23 months ago

    Personally, I don't think so. Well, maybe if you have thousands of articles and a big following. It probably was years ago, but I think that ship has sailed.I think you can make a few dollars a month if you are diligent--maybe $50 or so, but that is just my personal opinion.

    1. greenmind profile image95
      greenmindposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      It can be done. You don't need thousands of articles – just a few dozen in a niche that you have mastered. You need to be a solid technical writer, philosophical about the occasional setback, and very, very patient. It has taken several years, but I now make meaningful $$ here.

  15. Abid Taga profile image62
    Abid Tagaposted 23 months ago

    Hi, I have a question about anazon adds.

    Do we add amazon capsule in article or not?

    1. PaulGoodman67 profile image94
      PaulGoodman67posted 23 months agoin reply to this

      Only if it's strictly relevant to the article. This generally means that you write about the specific product and it's intrinsic to your writing.

      For instance, if you write about fixing a washing machine and recommend a specific tool for the job. You would also need to write a paragraph or more explaining your recommendation.

      Just adding an Amazon link to a book that's loosely connected with a topic is a bad idea.

      Just casually "adding" an Amazon link or capsule generally is always bad, it has to be intrinsic and you have to explain it.

      Generally speaking, making money with Amazon is still possible, but it has got harder and harder over the years. Google and HP have become  much stricter. It can be done, but it's no longer as easy to make money from.

      Adding Amazon links/capsules has to be considered, not done casually. It can get snipped, or even screw up your article's chances if you do it badly.

      1. Abid Taga profile image62
        Abid Tagaposted 23 months agoin reply to this

        Thanks to increase my knowledge.

  16. Nell Rose profile image90
    Nell Roseposted 23 months ago

    A few years ago I used to earn a couple of hundred a month. But that was the highest. These days It has got a lot lower. Admittedly I don't write so much here now. But I will be doing some more soon. It's just a case of sharing the hubs of yours and other peoples to keep it fresh.

  17. CyclingFitness profile image89
    CyclingFitnessposted 15 months ago

    I've had months where I've earnt a couple of hundred dollars a month however the CPM decrease and a move away from large numbers of Amazon products hit me quite hard.
    I actually had a 300 word article earning about 50 dollars a month up until the pandemic so there was plenty of opportunity to make money alongside my day job.

    I still make a nice amount of pocket money however the amount of work needed to make a full time income from Hubpages alone I fear involves a very popular niche and a large amount of content.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)