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jump to last post 1-16 of 16 discussions (36 posts)

How do you check your grammar errors before posting?

  1. manlypoetryman profile image77
    manlypoetrymanposted 6 years ago

    Whit kind'a graemmer eerrors are ya' talking about?

    1. Daffy Duck profile image60
      Daffy Duckposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I write my hubs on a word document then I copy and paste them to hubpages.

      1. earnestshub profile image89
        earnestshubposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Am I the only dumb-ass who just puts it up and hopes for the best? smile

        I dunno, word threatens me with all sorts of errors such as "passive sentence" and tries to talk me out of writing stuff and steals all my best words like smurgolocious pretending it is not a real word then swiping it and storing it somewhere to give to Microsoft.

        I don''t trust Bill Gates software since he started giving all those billions to charity.


        Seriously I think I may just be dead slack! lol

        1. Lady_E profile image73
          Lady_Eposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Lol. I like this comment.

          1. earnestshub profile image89
            earnestshubposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Me too! lol

  2. profile image0
    Sherlock221bposted 6 years ago

    I have used online grammar checks before, but don't think much of them.  One checker suggested that using the word "lady" was sexist, suggesting that "woman" was the correct word to use.  Yet, the use of "gentleman" went without comment.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image80
      Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      There is no grammar checker that does a better job than the human mind that understands how words come together to make meaning.

      You check your grammar errors before posting by knowing the rules of grammar. No software can do this for you.

      1. Peter Owen profile image60
        Peter Owenposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Well said - people are constantly looking for technology to solve shortcomings.

        1. Sally's Trove profile image80
          Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Precisely.

  3. Uninvited Writer profile image83
    Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago

    I use Word

  4. austere125rivers profile image56
    austere125riversposted 6 years ago

    Thanks to everybody, but Microsoft Word cannot correct grammatical errors, right?
    There are some smart sites that can correct grammatical errors, but you have to pay.

    1. Urbane Chaos profile image99
      Urbane Chaosposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I use Word 2007, and it does a pretty decent job of correcting grammatical errors.  It also has different reports you can run, such as passive sentences and reading ease.  I always write first with word, then move it to my hub.

  5. Just Ask Susan profile image91
    Just Ask Susanposted 6 years ago

    I use word, and hope that I have not made any mistakes. I am too cheap to buy a program smile

    1. Sally's Trove profile image80
      Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      No program can do better than your educated and trained mind. Don't waste your money.

      1. Urbane Chaos profile image99
        Urbane Chaosposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        This is true...

        ...but at the same time, there are instances where a little extra help is needed.  Occasionally, word does pick up on little things here and there.  When it does, I always go back and re-read the sentence to make sure that it's right.  Most of the time, I don't have to worry, but sometimes, the program suggests a re-ordering of words that I wouldn't have thought of.

        1. Sally's Trove profile image80
          Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          That's because you already have a grounding in grammar. You're not looking to Word to fix everything that's wrong, only to suggest an alternative to something you might have missed. Word is somewhat good for that, but more times than not, it's WAY off the mark.

          1. Urbane Chaos profile image99
            Urbane Chaosposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            You're right about that.. sometimes it does have the tendency to come up with things that are slightly bizarre.

            Word still has it's advantages outside of grammar checking though.  It catches a lot of misspelled words, and I've found the reading reports to be invaluable.  Also, my dictation software works perfect with word, which is a huge added bonus.

            Word should never be used in place of a good education, but, like any tool, it should be used as such.

            1. Joy56 profile image76
              Joy56posted 6 years agoin reply to this

              you just cannot beat a good education

              1. Sally's Trove profile image80
                Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                Absolutely, agreed.

                And I'd like to add that education about writing skills can come from experiences in high school or college or much, much later in life. It depends on whether you really, really want to communicate so that others can understand you.

                There is no excuse for faulty grammar when you want to write a public piece. Grammar checkers might be helpful, but only to the extent that you understand the rules of grammar in the first place.

                1. Urbane Chaos profile image99
                  Urbane Chaosposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  You hit it right on here..

                  Learning is an on-going process that shouldn't ever end after high school or college.  With writing, I don't believe that anyone ever stops learning.

  6. Eleanor's Words profile image97
    Eleanor's Wordsposted 6 years ago

    I don't use anything, just read it carefully myself and hope I spot any errors.

  7. Uninvited Writer profile image83
    Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago

    While Word does not get it right all the time, it is very good. I can usually find what they miss.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image80
      Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Word grammar checking will often confuse, and if you are of a sort of mind that goes down irrelevant paths just for the hell of it, then Word is your worst grammar enemy.

    2. earnestshub profile image89
      earnestshubposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I just type into whatever space I have to type in to, be it a forum a form or a  hub text capsule, hope for the best, then find my errors a couple of years later! lol

  8. WoodsmensPost profile image70
    WoodsmensPostposted 6 years ago

    That little wizard who watches over word does a pretty good job at correcting grammar, I always wondered what his name was or is? 

    Actually  I don't check for grammar errors before posting to the forums hmm

    1. Sally's Trove profile image80
      Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      He/it sucks, just like the Paper Clip. Or is it the paper clip about whom you are speaking? smile

  9. Mark Ewbie profile image86
    Mark Ewbieposted 6 years ago

    I use Word. It picks up typos and misspellings. I also notice the grammar suggestions.  Sometimes I will accept what it says and simplify a sentence construction, because I do tend to write slightly back to front long winded sentences on a first pass.

    I tend to just type and type my first draft - it will need a reread and edit anyway, regardless of the grammar and typo issues.

    At least it makes the job of building a Hubpage easy - becuase by that time I have a fully constructed piece ready to cut and paste.  And of course I have a copy just in case.

  10. jm72writes profile image86
    jm72writesposted 6 years ago

    I use Word for the spelling and grammar.  If there are grammar issues, I change it even if it doesn't look wrong to me.  Like the fact that it recognizes sentence fragments.  A lot of writing uses fragments for a casual sound in the article, but many professional sites won't use it, so I change it. 
    After I check with Word, I read it over myself looking for specific things that I have a tendency to have problems with.  I may have to look at it two or three times to make sure I caught everything (and I'm sure I still miss some).  I know it sounds like a lot of work, but I think it's a good practice to get into if I should ever write for someone else.

  11. classicalgeek profile image86
    classicalgeekposted 6 years ago

    I find that I catch at least 95% of my grammatical errors simply by starting at the end of my article, and reading the sentences aloud, one at a time. Then I back up through the article.

    If I need a very complex sentence, and I am not sure of the grammar, I diagram it in my head.

    Earnestshub, I believe the word you are looking for is actually spelt smurgolocutious (the last half of that word meaning "full of words"). I look forward to reading your hub on smurgs. I must admit that I have not thought much about two midgets fighting in the vicinity of a power cable until you mentioned it (see the Urban Dictionary).

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=smurg

    1. earnestshub profile image89
      earnestshubposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Goodness me! I should have spell checked shouldn't I?

      Many people have not considered two midgets fighting under a power line, so don't feel bad about it, no biggy. smile

      I like to think of it as a very small niche subject myself. smile

      I tried writing about smurgs without the long-tail and got very few hits......the niche was too broad I suppose. smile

  12. Lady_E profile image73
    Lady_Eposted 6 years ago

    I've always typed my articles in Microsoft Word and then copied them into Hub Capsules, but always proof read prior to copying.

    Good Luck.

  13. tamron profile image71
    tamronposted 6 years ago

    I use a plugin and it works great but it doesn't work in word or any other program it does however work with Google docs.  It works when you make comments,forum post, and in most tett editors

  14. tamron profile image71
    tamronposted 6 years ago

    I use a plugin or extinction and it works great but it doesn't work in word or any other program it does however work with Google docs.  It works when you make comments,forum post, and in most text editors such as hubpages.  It catches some grammar mistakes and some miss use of words.  Like your you're or there or their http://www.afterthedeadline.com/ I believe you must have firefox but it might work on other browsers and its free and it does not slow your computer down.

  15. Jeff Berndt profile image86
    Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago

    I use both the spellchecker in Word and my own eyes to proofread. I wish I had the means to hire a proofreader other than myself, because when a person reads his own writing, he can miss errors that he'd catch in something he didn't write.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image80
      Sally's Troveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Every good writer needs a proofreader, and more times than not, an editor. I am lucky to have a daughter who has this critical eye. She proofs and edits for me and I dog-sit for her, among a few other things. So, we have a trade that works. I think I get the better end of the deal.smile

      You may find that you have a friend out there somewhere, with that eye, with whom you can trade.

  16. sneha rani profile image46
    sneha raniposted 2 months ago

    I personally use https://grammarchecker.net/ and it has given me amazing results so far.

     
    working