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jump to last post 1-17 of 17 discussions (17 posts)

What's the best thing to do when you're a guest but don't like the meal that's s

  1. Nate Ahern profile image59
    Nate Ahernposted 6 years ago

    What's the best thing to do when you're a guest but don't like the meal that's served?

  2. RTalloni profile image86
    RTalloniposted 6 years ago

    Have a grateful spirit and attitude, compliment the effort and the generosity in as gracious as manner possible without even a hint of sarcasm.  Set self completely aside and focus on your responsibility as a guest.

  3. Nate Ahern profile image59
    Nate Ahernposted 6 years ago

    Ha!  Great answer.  And the first one at that. 

    For what it's worth, I heartily agree.

  4. chanroth profile image74
    chanrothposted 6 years ago

    I would not try to be rude and eat whatever that is served. And if possible, you excuse yourself and say your not hungry and fulfill yourself with water.

  5. Brainy Bunny profile image94
    Brainy Bunnyposted 6 years ago

    I agree. Eat as much of your serving as possible, although I think it is fine to decline seconds. Thank your host sincerely for Inviting you over, and tell them next time it's your turn to cook!

  6. profile image0
    Emily Sparksposted 6 years ago

    Unless allergic, try your best to eat it or you will offend the host/hostess.

  7. Attikos profile image78
    Attikosposted 6 years ago

    If it's so bad you don't want to be invited back nor keep your hosts as your friends, just say it's awful and you can't stomach it. Otherwise, eat it, smile, hold up your end of the conversation, and compliment the dinner.

  8. brielise profile image61
    brieliseposted 6 years ago

    I'm pretty picky so I have this problem a lot, but I was always just taught to eat it graciously, with a smile on your face. I try not to take large portions and can just blame my diet on not going back for seconds!

  9. xethonxq profile image64
    xethonxqposted 6 years ago

    Be polite and gracious and eat what you can. You can stop somewhere on the way home and fill your tummy later.

  10. onegoodwoman profile image75
    onegoodwomanposted 6 years ago

    Thank your host(ESS)  for having you in their home, and their effort and hospitality.



    Never pretend to have enjoyed something, that you did not, but do not call attention to the fact.

    The next menu will probably be different.

    Accept the gift in the spirit that it was given....

  11. pstraubie48 profile image86
    pstraubie48posted 6 years ago

    masterfully move the food around on your plate ...take a bite here and there...and when offered seconds, say how full you are.
    and/or, apologize for for not eating all of your food...must have been the snack you had before you remembered the dinner invite.
    do not rave about how much you loved the food as they may invite you again to have exactly the same thing...thank them for the invite....and be gracious. then go home and eat!!!

  12. daisynicolas profile image79
    daisynicolasposted 6 years ago

    Yep, that happened  to me so many times and I declined the invite again.  But I do offer to cook in the future or just go out.  Meanwhile, I take itty bites when I do not know who's doing the cooking.  If it's good, I compliment.  If not, I stay quiet.

  13. LoriSoard profile image74
    LoriSoardposted 6 years ago

    There is usually SOMETHING there you can tolerate. I try to fill my plate with that and take just a tiny bit of the other things. It isn't as noticeable when you don't eat the other dishes. Also, you can rave over the things you do like. For example, if they were serving something I hated, but had green beans on the table, I would put a lot of g. beans on there and say, "Oh, my gosh. I LOVE your green beans. I am so happy right now. I could make a meal of these." Most hosts won't even notice.

  14. Swetankraj profile image67
    Swetankrajposted 6 years ago

    Parcel it to my home. And bring something else. This could never stop untill i parceled at least 100 items. A week would be more enjoyable with these parceled meals. Very interesting question XD

  15. debbie roberts profile image80
    debbie robertsposted 6 years ago

    I think the best thing to do would be not to make a fuss, be polite, eat what you can. It's always a good idea to ask potential guests if there is any food they don't eat, it helps prevent awkward situations like this,

  16. moonfairy profile image79
    moonfairyposted 6 years ago

    I faced this dilemna just yesterday! A kindly woman was making breakfast and offered me a dish of french toast and fried bananas. Never having eaten fried bananas, I was willing to give it a go. What she didn't tell me is that the bread itself was fried in a ton of butter, as well as the bananas. The bananas also become incredibly sweet when fried. I took the first bite and panicked. I hated it. But I kept the rest of the bites small and drank water with each mouthful. When I finished she offered me more, which I graciously declined. I did tell her that it was delicious and thanked her, but next time I'll be careful when she offers me a bite to eat! To be honest, if she would have left the room I would have stuffed the whole thing inside a napkin and tossed it in the trash, it was that bad.lol

  17. vespawoolf profile image96
    vespawoolfposted 6 years ago

    Just smile and eat! You don't have to say you enjoyed the food, but it will broaden your horizons to at least try it. After all, the food was offered in the spirit of hospitality. I've eaten guinea pig, tadpole stew, minnow ceviche and cream of hermit crab soup so as not to offend my hosts. Only the guinea pig was palatable, by the way. :   )

 
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