Can children eat food cooked with beer or wine?

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  1. vespawoolf profile image96
    vespawoolfposted 5 years ago

    Can children eat food cooked with beer or wine?

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    Yes, because the alcohol evaporates from the heat of cooking. Therefore, a child is not getting any alcohol in their systems.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good point!

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you!

  3. Jackie Lynnley profile image91
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 5 years ago

    Alcohol does generally cook out in long or high heat dishes but I would take care with things like rum cake, etc. Making one from a recipe I got here at Hp I assumed the rum would all cook out but upon tasting it, along with my company (we all really loved it!) had to wonder if indeed all the rum was cooked out. I did a search about it and found out that it can take as long as two and one-half hours to cook out all alcohol and that flamed brandy can leave 75% of the alcohol! Not only children to be concerned with but going against medications, it is a subject to consider seriously as I have been doing too with Christmas nearing and planning more rum cakes.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree about the rum cake. How interesting that it takes 2 1/2 hours to cook out all the alcohol. I really appreciate your thorough answer!

    2. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      All rum cakes are not created equal.  Some are actually basted in rum after they have been baked.  Similarly, my own fruitcake recipe is only for those over 21 years old!  It gets basted for a month! No dry fruitcake here! ;-)

    3. aj-disaster87 profile image59
      aj-disaster87posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I also agree about the Rum cake. A girlfriend of mine for my 22nd birthday made me one. She put far to much rum in it. It was really soggy and I didn't care to eat much of it. I had certainly felt its effects.

    4. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      DzyMsLizzy, I also love fruit cake and rum cake soaked in liquor. There's nothing worse than dry cake! :   )

  4. MickS profile image69
    MickSposted 5 years ago

    Yes because the cooking clears the alcohol; also, the last time I looked it was only illegal to give alcohol to children under 5 in the UK, I don't know of the legal position in other countries.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Wow, that's interesting information! The U.S. is stricter on their liquor laws.

    2. MickS profile image69
      MickSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is only on last info, I think it has to do with the administration of medicine and is not leave for parents to give kids a slug of whiskey, etc.

  5. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
    DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years ago

    While it is true that the alcohol cooks out of any dish, there is also another, fancy-looking, yet easy way to add that flavor.  If you are cooking things like stews, where you are pre-browning the meat, you can also add the flavor of the wine or hard liquor at this stage by flaming it.

    Simply remove the grease/oils from the pan, so they do not catch fire, and then, in a large metal soup ladle, pre-heat the liquor over a low flame, then, light the liquor itself aflame with a match, and pour the burning alcohol over the meat.
    Stir continually to distribute, until the flame dies out, and you have added a unique flavor without adding alcoholic content.

    When doing this, be sure to have short sleeves, or roll up your sleeves, and keep long hair tied back,  just as a safety precaution.  Also, have the pot lid handy just in case you need to quickly smother the flames.  It is unlikely you will have a problem, but prepared is better than not.

    1. suzzycue profile image91
      suzzycueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's awesome I want to try this. Seared in alcohol that would be a treat.

    2. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I really appreciate the safety tips. That's a great method to add unique flavor to a dish.

    3. Debby Bruck profile image70
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Lizzy - you are full of surprises! Stay clear of the flames. I would rather watch you prepare the meal and add this special flavor.

    4. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds delicious!

  6. Attikos profile image78
    Attikosposted 5 years ago

    Contrary to popular belief, the alcohol does not all evaporate from dishes during cooking. For baked or simmered ones, about a quarter of it remains after an hour, less than a tenth after two and a half hours. It never all comes out.

    As a practical matter, you do not need to worry about it. The small amount of alcohol remaining in a cooked dish is not harmful, and it is unlikely social services will come kicking in your door to arrest you and haul your children off to an institution. Of course, as authoritarian as the government is growing you never know, but I have not heard of it happening.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Very interesting that the alcohol doesn't cook out completely. Thanks!

    2. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for that link. You're right. Even cooking for 2.5 hours leaves 5% alcohol. I have some friends who avoid alcohol completely, so this is a good statistic to know. I really appreciate it!

    3. Debby Bruck profile image70
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The serving size portion may make a difference, too. For a child who eats very little (some say like a bird) the amount of alcohol would likely be negligible.

  7. Sharkye11 profile image92
    Sharkye11posted 5 years ago

    Even if the alcohol didn't completely cook out of the food, I can't imagine how much of the dish a child would have to eat in order to be affected. Especially if this food was only cooked occasionally!

    Alcohol has been given to children in varying doses over the centuries. In medicines, tonics, food, and even as beverages. Humanity still exists, so I think the chances of a dash of wine in your sautee hurting a child would be extremely slim.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image95
      DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Heck, back in the early days, (Mayflower era and before), kids were routinely served beer.  Back then, beer was actually a way of preserving grains; it was like "liquid bread." 
      And, they obviously survived or we wouldn't exist! ;-)

    2. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is a valid point. Small amounts in infrequent doses aren't harmful to children.

  8. Handicapped Chef profile image77
    Handicapped Chefposted 5 years ago

    don't see why not. The heat of cooking will evaporate any residual alcohol and you will be left with only the taste. Of course it also depends on the person and the depth of their psycological dependancy.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      True, it might not be a good idea for some guests.

  9. profile image0
    paxwillposted 5 years ago

    Like others have said, the alcohol will evaporate if cooked long enough and or hot enough.  Just wanted to add that fondue will still be slightly alcoholic when you serve it, so if you are trying to avoid having kids ingest any alcohol, don't serve that (unless you used a substitute liquid).  But as Sharkeye11 says, small amounts given infrequently are harmless to healthy children.  No worse than cold and allergy medicine.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That makes sense. Fondue isn't heated enough to evaporate the alcohol. Thank you.

  10. profile image0
    donyusifposted 5 years ago

    Yes and i don't see any thing wrong with it, well unless someone tells them either way parent's choice. LOL

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      So true!

  11. Ask TeTe profile image59
    Ask TeTeposted 5 years ago

    Hi Vespawoolf! 

    I think you might want to consult with your pediatrician who knows your child's medical history.  Just FYI...my children grew up on food that was prepared with wine more often than beer, but I have used beer on occasion.  When I asked the pediatrician about it, he said it was fine because the alcohol cooks out.  The only think you might want to consider is chemical sensitivity.  Wine has sodium nitrate added in addition to the naturally occurring nitrates, and some people (not just children) can be sensitive to that.  I found this out the hard way with myself and my son...we seem to have trouble with certain types of wine.   

    Good luck and HAPPY COOKING!!

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer! i hadn't considered the nitrate issue and you're right, a lot of people are sensitive to it. I think the advice of a pediatrician would definitely put my mind at ease. Thank you!

  12. francisassissi profile image60
    francisassissiposted 5 years ago

    If the content is not too much, then it is fine.

    In strict religion, there are many prohibitions in some food and drink intakes.

    So you better check pastor before eating something.

    1. Attikos profile image78
      Attikosposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The pastor's on his own. He isn't getting my bourbon sweet potatoes.

  13. profile image0
    ExoticHippieQueenposted 5 years ago

    While 100% of the alcohol may not evaporate from the food that your are cooking with beer or wine, unless the child has a special medical condition, or is taking a medication that could possibly interact with the remaining alcohol, a small amount of the food should be okay.  A high amount of alcohol in a particular food should probably be avoided.  Any uncertainty should be cleared up by contacting your pharmacist or physician.

  14. molometer profile image83
    molometerposted 5 years ago

    Hi Vespawoolf,

    Firstly it depends on whether they like the taste or not. The alcohol will usually burn off, if cooked at a high enough temperature.

    Secondly it depends on local cultural and religious considerations.
    Some people believe that alcohol is bad for human consumption.

    There is no evidence to suggest that alcohol is detrimental to health especially when used in cooking.

    So the answer is yes. Children can eat food cooked with beer or wine and even spirits.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your very thorough answer. We've missed seeing you around!

  15. peachpurple profile image81
    peachpurpleposted 4 years ago

    i do steam chicken with chinese wine- just 1 tsp. My kids love the taste eventhough they could hardly taste the differences. It is ok, they don't go tipsy after eating the chicken.

    1. vespawoolf profile image96
      vespawoolfposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I bet your chicken is delicious!

  16. K Wm Sears profile image71
    K Wm Searsposted 17 months ago

    They sure can.  If cooked properly the alcohol will be gone and you will be left with the flavor of whatever you used.  I have served Beer Can Chicken for years at church pot-lucks, though I get a lot of looks, everyone loved it and not one person staggered out of the church.  Beware of Rum Frosting though, without cooking it the alcohol will remain and you can get tipsy if you eat enough, or lick the spoon too much.

 
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