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jump to last post 1-50 of 63 discussions (96 posts)

Can you catch any infection from toilet water splash?

  1. tnvrstar profile image74
    tnvrstarposted 5 years ago

    Can you catch any infection  from toilet water splash?

    Can you get bacteria like h. pylori from toilet water splash?

  2. Homesteading profile image59
    Homesteadingposted 5 years ago

    No idea but I think you can catch anything from a public toilet.  NEVER sit on one!  Act like a helicopter & hover!  As far as a private toilet ... it is still filled with bacteria, although I must admit, I have no clue as to what h. pylori is but it sounds painful.  Types and kind doesn't bother me, can't see them with my eyes anyway, so as long they stay off my rear end, I'm happy.  Blunt, but truthful.  smile

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image97
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hover?  Please don't! That's what the paper covers are for--sometimes called "A$$ Gaskets."  Hoverers tend to sprinkle on the seat; cover or no, miserable for the next person.  If you MUST hover, please wipe the seat!

    2. profile image0
      Deborah Sextonposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      You are safe to sit on a toilet seat as long as you have no open sores, cuts, or wounds on any part that touches the toilet seat, such as your buttocks, thighs, etc

    3. JustinCottril profile image47
      JustinCottrilposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      You can catch anything in a public toilet cause different people use it every day.

  3. RichieMogwai profile image80
    RichieMogwaiposted 5 years ago

    I think so, if the water is dirty. It depends on what part of your body the water goes to, if there is an opening such as a scratch or a bruise. The chances of catching the infection is very low though. But you never know.  So to protect yourself, use your own toilet and if in cases where this is not possible, always bring a sanitary wet wipe with you. One wipe can kill all the bacteria that can cause the infection.

    1. Coolbreezing profile image61
      Coolbreezingposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      Bacterial infections are due to unsanitary condition. Which mean the bacteria thrives to the point of infection because the internal condition of the vagina had been made highly sensible to infection.

  4. d.william profile image65
    d.williamposted 5 years ago

    It is highly unlikely that one could catch anything from toilet water splash in the home.  However, using a public toilet can conceivably give you many types of infections if you are not careful about the splash, or sanitize the seat before sitting down and always wash your hands when you are finished using the facilities.
    In a healthy body, with a healthy immune system,  it is almost impossible to get any kind of infection at all.  We become susceptible to infections when we are in a weakened or compromised state from illness, poor hygiene, and especially when our immune system is impaired. 
    H.pylori can be transmitted from contaminated fingers to mouth, so cleanliness is imperative when using public toilets.
    It is never recommended that anyone drink water from the toilet, especially children and pets.

  5. Dr. Haddox profile image78
    Dr. Haddoxposted 5 years ago

    A dirty toilet bowl that may not be cleaned frequently can harbor millions of micro-organisms, some of the being pathogenic (such as E.coli). E. coli are bacteria that are present in any environment, such as a toilet bowl, where people urinate and defecate. The fact that feces, or human stool, is disposed of via the toilet bowl, and water in that bowl is contaminated with E. coli (even when one cannot see these organism (hint: micro-organisms), meaning that the toilet may look clean, but still contain organisms, is a good thing to think about. Meaning, you have to be careful when you use a toilet, public or otherwise. I cannot remember how many urinary tract infections I have treated, primarily in my female patients, where the guilty organism was E. coli. Cystitis, or bladder infections, in women primarily, and some mild kidney infections that I have treated, were caused by E. coli (I know because I always do lab work (tests) which measure the number of E. coli in the urine, to help me make the diagnosis of urinary tract infection
    Now here is the sad part, I have had young girls who have come to me with urinary tract infections (bladder infections) who said that they let the tissue that they wiped themselves with, touch the water in the bowl, inadvertently, but still used the tissue to clean their vaginal area. What they did was, without intentionally meaning to, directly infected their urinary system with E. coli.
    Now, imagine if toilet bowl water accidentally splashed up into a females vaginal area, and the water was contaminated with E. coli, and she wiped herself dry, not knowing that it would have been best to "wash herself careful" with soap and water.
    h. pylori has been associated with stomach ulcers in many cases, and therefore, have been treated antibiotic therapy as part of a ulcer treatment regimen.
    I would like to say in closing, that most of the urinary tract infections that I have seen were not related to toilet water, most probably. However, notice that toilet seat covers are available in many public restrooms? These paper covers are a far cry better than nothing. They may have actually helped people keep from getting infections, and especially organisms like "crab lice." Be careful.
    Regards.
    Dr. Haddox

    1. Homesteading profile image59
      Homesteadingposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      My Sister took me to the bathroom with her via phone, she cursed the toilet bowl water, asked what was wrong, she said "back splash" & it would cause a UTI.  In two days, she was on antibiotics. Never happened to me but what you teach: Sister tru

    2. profile image0
      Deborah Sextonposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Swimming in contaminated water has also resulted in small outbreaks of VTEC O157. Drinking water that has not been treated to remove bacteria can also be a source of infection.

    3. profile image55
      Kimla10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      T/water splashed near my anus when i was in school 20yrs on last wk had blood and it turned into a small haemorroid. yesterday happened again damn it i have used rubbing alcohol and witch hazel. Any suggestions to cleanse area from infection? thank u

    4. profile image53
      tom boothposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      hello i am just wondering, i have a leaking toilet and the water is coming into my bathroom, i have used a towel to soak up the leakage until its fixed, and i picked up the towel to replace and forgot to wash my hands will this spread many bad germs?

    5. profile image55
      nurealamsharifposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Melanopeel Skincare is dermatological grade Mandelic acid, Lactic acid and our special skin microneedle derma roller to clear acne and skin discolorations.

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    6. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      Wonderful and very informative infomation thank you for sharing.

    7. batang helmet profile image59
      batang helmetposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      yes it is..it can cause a lot of diseases...so it's better to be safe than never

    8. lolo127 profile image73
      lolo127posted 3 months agoin reply to this

      Oh my, toilet seats are scary! I let someone live with me who never told me about their skin condition (SARS). She got sick enough to go to the hospital where I went to visit her. I was about to use the bathroom in her room only to have a nurse stop me. The nurse told me to use a public hospital bathroom because my roommate's condition meant the toilet seat had to be disinfected every time she used it along with anything she touches, bedding, showers, ect... imagine me surprise and how angry I was at her for not telling me herself! She put my health at risk. had I known about her condition, I would never have let her move in with me.

  6. LadyEstere profile image59
    LadyEstereposted 5 years ago

    Can you catch any infection from toilet water splash? Can you get bacteria like Helicobacter pylori  from toilet water splash? The answer is no. If you have open sores or cuts on your hands or on your back side it is very possible to get a bacteria infection, just not necessarily h.pylori. Helicobacter pylori is in the digestive system in the intestines and causes ulcers. It could be possible to pass the bacteria from hands to mouth if hands weren't washed after using the toilet. But it isn't common.

    1. tnvrstar profile image74
      tnvrstarposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      So that means toilet water splash in the anus won't transmit H. pylori? If it's true then I am happy.

    2. cat on a soapbox profile image96
      cat on a soapboxposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Why flush when you're still seated???

    3. DzyMsLizzy profile image97
      DzyMsLizzyposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Why flush when still seated?  Have you never experienced the "2-flusher" episode?  I don't want to get too graphic, so please use your imagination and memory.

  7. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 4 years ago

    I think generally NO unless one is actively infected w/ a GI bug and is flushing after vomiting or passing infectious stool. These airborne pathogens are highly contagious. Toothbrushes should be stored away in cabinets or drawers for this reason. Hand washing after using the bathroom is more important than worrying about backsplash in most situations. Some "clean-looking" kitchen counters are actually greater health hazards than toilets- ugh!

  8. BuffaloGal1960 profile image71
    BuffaloGal1960posted 4 years ago

    UTIs have a variety of causes. Bladder or kidney deformities disallowing complete emptying, bad bathroom habits, too much soda, too much caffeine, holding urine too long like at school.

    Wiping from front to back is important. Using non-scented tissue and adequate Vitamin C to name a few are good deterrents, as well as, drinking plenty of water.

    Our organs are only as good as how we take care of them.

    As for the toilet water, you can get infections from any germs you ingest, inhale, touch or consume.  In addition to toilet water, you'd be surprised that your kitchen sink may actually host MORE bacteria than the toilet. We tend to clean our toilets with a vengeance and act like the sink doesn't need it as much - it does.

    1. Coolbreezing profile image61
      Coolbreezingposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      I have now the knowledge to create a product that can treat any vagina infectious disease while at the same time tighten it up. She will feel like a virgin all over again. She will be so tight even with lubricant you'll experience difficulties

  9. padmendra profile image46
    padmendraposted 4 years ago

    It is correct that there are chances of infection when you go to any dirty public restrooms. There are chances that during water splash the  germs may transfer from the toilet seat to your urethral or genital regions or also through a cut or score on the buttocks. The infection is then transmitted to a human body which can further escalate the problem to your health.

    1. Coolbreezing profile image61
      Coolbreezingposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      Infections are highly possible to all human beings who are already suffering from an acidic condition.

      In that respect, you are correct that toilet water that makes contact with the vagina can result to infection.

  10. profile image51
    FactsbyMurrayposted 4 years ago

    One things that has not been mentioned here is the minimum infectious dose.  This is the smallest amount of a specific antigen(in this case microbes) that is need to cause an infection.  It is highly unlikely that a splash from the toilet water is going to carry enough of the specific group of microbes that can survive in our body to infect you.  Sitting on a toilet seat is a different story.  On top of this, most of the infectious microbes you are concerned with (UTIs are unlikely for you) have only one mode of entrance: the mouth.  As long as you wash your hands and don't touch your mouth on the way to the sink, you have little to worry about.

  11. Breatheeasy3 profile image72
    Breatheeasy3posted 4 years ago

    lol...such a funny but perhaps important question. It is constantly stated that toilet water is often cleaner than water from the kitchen. Perhaps if it was really a problem, then your cat/dog, whom loves drinking from it would have many illnesses by now. I think the problem doesn't rely on the water itself, but the contaminated porcelain that vessels it...as well as the seat.

    1. profile image55
      nurealamsharifposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      I think so, if the water is dirty. It depends on what part of your body.
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      We are expert in providing web to graphics and other Software and IT services with a taste of modern elegance.We provide ultimate solution to

  12. profile image57
    TabithaDBrownposted 4 years ago

    Yes. Most definitely. Its more frequent in women then men though. I personally have gotten an STD from this. I was very depressed, and taking a lot of prescription medication. I was a little out of it for a while. I was at the courthouse for several weeks during my husbands trial. I was NOT at all sexually active, so there was no way otherwise. I had also had a baby six months prior to this, and had been thoroughly tested, ad clean since having any sexual contact.  So the doctor explained to me it was from the toilet. So now I either hold it, or "hover" if an emergency

    1. primpo profile image78
      primpoposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Oh my god, that is terrible.  I know In public toilets I always stand over toilet, I'm afraid to sit.  sorry that happened to you.

  13. erorantes profile image52
    erorantesposted 4 years ago

    Yes you can get an infection. There are living things we can not see, but there are in any place.

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 20 months agoin reply to this

      Terry this may true of your pacific disease , but the question was (any) infection , that is why my comment included this problem as well.

  14. bahaykubo profile image61
    bahaykuboposted 4 years ago

    my suggestion is to flush any toilet before use.  even if it's teeming with germs, at least flushing minimizes it.
    like you, i am annoyed by back splashes.  a back splash happens when you drop constipated excretion, usually heavy. this can be avoided by taking in lots of fluids all the time.

  15. profile image49
    salmasifposted 4 years ago

    Yes. because our body is very sensitive. sometimes people contaminate the water by dipping their hands into it , so be careful.

  16. Sadiq Busuri profile image58
    Sadiq Busuriposted 4 years ago

    I don't think so unless its really dirty or if the splash is a lot

  17. jaydene profile image70
    jaydeneposted 4 years ago

    I sure hope not, or there are a lot of infections out there

  18. shanice whitter profile image75
    shanice whitterposted 4 years ago

    Not always,but that water is contagious so always becareful

  19. adriantupello profile image59
    adriantupelloposted 4 years ago

    Yes you can get an infection. There are living things we can not see, but there are in any place sir.

    1. profile image0
      Deborah Sextonposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      But they cannot live outside the body long enough to cause anyone any problems

    2. Coolbreezing profile image61
      Coolbreezingposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      The living things that you cannot see are known as microbes. Likewise, you have good and bad bacterias in many parts of your body systems. Had you had all good bacterias in your blood stream your immune system could not train itself to protect you.

  20. profile image0
    Deborah Sextonposted 4 years ago

    Many people are afraid of public restrooms, but the toilet seat is not a common way of catching or transmitting infection to/from others. Many germs that cause disease can survive for only a short time outside of their human hosts, even on the toilet seat. It is a very rare thing for an infection to occur by coming into contact with germs in a restroom.  The only way that the germs could infect you is by going from the seat to a cut or open wound on your thighs and/or buttocks, and you probably won’t see this happen in your lifetime. 

    As far as I know, no one has ever caught a sexually transmitted disease that way.

  21. Penny G profile image71
    Penny Gposted 4 years ago

    It's really hard to say, because how would you know that something came from that. It does freak me out when that happens though. Put TP in the water first so it won't splash, don't take any chances.

  22. flpalermo profile image60
    flpalermoposted 4 years ago

    Never flush while you are sitting on the Throne!

  23. Muhammadpandor profile image60
    Muhammadpandorposted 3 years ago

    No because ordinary urine is not harmful to the skin

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      Ordinary urine mixed with contaminated toilet water and feces bacteria that was present , still is not sanitary to touch the skin.

  24. SAQIB6608 profile image74
    SAQIB6608posted 3 years ago

    1 word answer - Yes. The splash is really hazardous particularly if you have have an injury/ cut on the exposed parts while bathing/ using toilet. The infectious water/ polluted liquid may come in contact chemically with injured area and cause serious ailments/ disorders.

    1. Coolbreezing profile image61
      Coolbreezingposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      The main reason for the infection isn't because the toilet water is unsanitary, but instead because the vagina is temporarily suffering from an acidic condition which makes it highly probable that any bacterial infection will result to an infection.

  25. freecampingaussie profile image63
    freecampingaussieposted 3 years ago

    I have used public toilets all over the world even drop toilets and have never had a problem . If they are flushed first (except of course drop toilets ) they should be no worries of anything being in the water. It is worse if people hover as they usually make a mess ...

  26. profile image0
    MrDanielAbramposted 3 years ago

    Toilet water is actually very clean water and it is not likely to get an infection.

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      If people use your toilet and past parasites you visibly can not see your toilet  water is not 100 % clean ,if you poop in it pee in it so many times a day there is still bacterial risk you can not see. No toilet is that safe.

  27. profile image55
    Eddy Vonposted 3 years ago

    If anything- I would worry more about the toilet seat and handle along with sinks/ and public bathroom door handles. They carry many diseases, especially Hep A as it comes from feces and lives /is active for up to 4 days. I worked in a drug and alcohol unit as a counselor for many years, this was a number one priority to keep clean. Also did you realize - even in your own bathroom, please do not leave your tooth brush in a vessel that is near a toilet. when you flush it releases many small amounts of water/urine and feces and can spread for many feet- I bet if you took your toothbrush and toilet water to be tested. Your toothbrush would harbor many more bacteria's..  Wash your hands, never open public door handles without a protective barrier (such as a Kleenex) and believe it or not- the menu you read at a restaurant carries more bacteria then both above!

    1. psbhatt profile image72
      psbhattposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      what if all these places are exposed to ultra violet lamps?

  28. Samuel Barrett profile image86
    Samuel Barrettposted 3 years ago

    Yes, and eeeew. Not likely but yes you could theoretically.

  29. profile image0
    Joshtheplumberposted 3 years ago

    Infections are irrelevant. Your faith makes you whole.

    This is one of Ruth's favorite songs:

    http://youtu.be/SQVUMG6LZGM

  30. the rawspirit profile image86
    the rawspiritposted 2 years ago

    Any toilet bowl is dirty, which is any public toilet harbor millions o pathogen bacteria  The fact that feces is disposed in the toilet bowl, the, the seat, and the bowl are contaminated. Use a cover on the seat and clean your genitals with soap and water after using a public restroom. They are filthy and full of disease.
    Have the best day ever. Bobby

  31. clivewilliams profile image85
    clivewilliamsposted 2 years ago

    If you sit on a filthy toilet with filthy stagnant water...definitely! especially in public bathrooms. If the toilet is clean and the water is clean probably not. But i would feel uncomfortable having toilet water splash on my sweet butt, especially if its a public bathroom. That would call for excessive scrubbing and disinfectant.

  32. profile image54
    Faisal Hafeezposted 2 years ago

    I think so...
    But you get such kind of bacteria : if you wish for it.

  33. Besarien profile image85
    Besarienposted 2 years ago

    Worry more about what you touch with your hands every day- money, faucet handles, doors, grocery carts, meat juices on packaging, pesticides on produce- not washing your hands thoroughly or often enough and eating or rubbing your eyes can hurt you a lot more than getting back splash on your unbroken skin.

  34. JG Hemlock profile image80
    JG Hemlockposted 2 years ago

    I am not sure but I wouldn't want to take the chance. Once I was on a travel trip and I stopped at a walmart to use the restroom. My first mistake. I sat down not realizing that it was more than a splash but a wet splashed seat. I freaked out. No toilet paper was in the stall to even wipe it off. I got out of there and tried to get papertowels and soap and there was none of that either. I walked over to the hand sanitizer isle and pumped until I had enough in both hands and slid them down the back of my pants. hahaha. I didn't get sick but my husband did wonder why I ran out of the bathroom and did that in front of him. You should have seen his face! LOL

  35. Kiss andTales profile image80
    Kiss andTalesposted 2 years ago

    Yes taking a class now and we are on the subject of microbiology .
    Very interesting information all people should know and practice safe hygiene to stay away from contamination and diseases.
    Staphylococci can be spread because it is found on the skin.
    Because skin sheds
    Transferred through direct contact or  formites meaning inanimate objects.
    That could be toilets. The reason they have paper to cover seats

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Also if this was not a concern of infectious diseases,  why do public places extremely cover hands and use proper precaution not to expose their skin, they wear gloves, and clean with brushes, some use power wash machines. The point is be safe.

  36. beaddve1800 profile image74
    beaddve1800posted 2 years ago

    Yes you can catch any kind of infection. Even the water that you use to wash your hands, it can be very dirty. That's why you need to wash your hands with the soup! smile

  37. Coolbreezing profile image61
    Coolbreezingposted 24 months ago

    Bacterial infections are due to unsanitary condition. Which mean the bacteria thrives to the point of infection because the internal condition of the vagina had been made highly sensible to infection. 

    The Ph of the vagina may have been acidic. Which would have made it highly sensible to bacterial infection. 

    Vaginas that are acidic leaves an unpleasant taste in the mouth that isn't healthy to swallow. Vaginas that are alkaline are pleasant to eat.

    It will not cause you to spit out the fluid and it is never easy to  infect a vagina that is alkaline with a bacteria. Sexual transmitted disease are highly transmitted amongst people who suffer from an acidic condition.

    Bacterial infection thrives in acidic condition because the the bacteria is being fed by the unsanitary condition of the vagina.

    1. Coolbreezing profile image61
      Coolbreezingposted 24 months agoin reply to this

      The Ph of the mouth is often the most acidic part of the human body. If the mouth isn't clean it can potentially infect the vagina. But if the vagina is alkaline the chances of that happening is minuscule.

  38. profile image58
    Nannypoppinsposted 23 months ago

    If you have an open wound on your skin and you come in contact with bacteria, yes you can get an infection.  However, if you do not have an open wound on your skin it is highly unlikely.

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 23 months agoin reply to this

      Pores are open , people use lotions , oils, they penetrate the skin.
      Germs on objects or in them can still effect anyone.
      So toilet water could splash back with bacterior from the walls.
      No one should think there is a 100 percent sterile toilet

  39. Thelma Alberts profile image90
    Thelma Albertsposted 21 months ago

    I think yes if the water and the toilet is so dirty. I tried my best not to use public toilet but if I ever have to use the public toilet I will never sit on it.

  40. compu-smart profile image62
    compu-smartposted 20 months ago

    I saw a documentary that tested this theory. They sampled tested this by leaving toothbrushes in their holders, and after the toilet had been flushed for (i can' remember for how long),  they tested the brushes and they all had faeces on them. Since then,

    I always ask my visitors to close the lid before flushing.
    I keep all toiletries, brushes, flannels and towels in cabinets and cupboards, and if I HAVE to use a public toilet, I hold my breath, and try not touching the walls, or anything physically possible. If that makes sense.

    FYI, I'm not OCD, smile

  41. Terrielynn1 profile image93
    Terrielynn1posted 20 months ago

    You need to do more research. Your conclusions are wrong. It is very rare to get anything the way you describe here. And h pylori, I have had. It's a bacteria in the stomache and gut. Nothing to do with toilet water. Treatments are swallowed. It used to be called beaver fever and is from contaiminated drinking water. You can have it for years before it gets to the point you even know you have it. I do use the covers most places provide now and lay down toilet paper when they don't. On I side note: I don't drink toilet water and can confirm that's not how I got it. LOL

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 20 months agoin reply to this

      Terry is it possible there may be human persites passed through human waste
      That lands in toilet water?
      I believe this is possible.
      If this backflashes your private area you could contaminate your body as well.
      Be safe.

    2. Terrielynn1 profile image93
      Terrielynn1posted 20 months agoin reply to this

      Iam commenting because it's not true to pass on theory as fact. H pilori cannot be passed this way. It has to be ingested. It's connected to contaminated drinking water. Not a little splash from a toilet.

  42. agenpeluntur profile image61
    agenpelunturposted 19 months ago
  43. AmieForsyth profile image60
    AmieForsythposted 19 months ago

    No, I find that possibility highly doubtful.

  44. SarahMK profile image37
    SarahMKposted 19 months ago

    i think if the toilet itself is not hygienic and is contaminated, but the water itself is clean water the same one that goes to the kitchen tap.

    1. Kiss andTales profile image80
      Kiss andTalesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      But the bowl is still contaminated  rather fresh water flows. It's like saying you will drink from a cup a person has TB from as long as the water is clean.
      Fresh water does not sanitize the bowl used.

  45. MichaelMcNabb profile image77
    MichaelMcNabbposted 19 months ago

    I suppose you could that's why you should flush before you sit down at a public toilet.  The fresh water wouldn't hold enough bacteria to infect you unless you started swimming around in it.  Drink more water and you won't have such heavy bombs anyways.

  46. nurse amile profile image60
    nurse amileposted 19 months ago

    Here's what i think, the skin is a first line of defense from infection, so if the skin is broken, bruised or teared in any way there's a chance that it can become infected when in contact with the environment, that is why we always clean a wound and apply a dressing over the site so it does not become infected.

  47. Brians Review profile image81
    Brians Reviewposted 18 months ago

    I suppose there are some out of the toilet examples, that are rare, that have given people infections on open sores or wounds. However, I was taught in high school health class, that people don't transmit diseases from toilets.

  48. primpo profile image78
    primpoposted 17 months ago

    I know this might sound funny to you but here it goes.  I am Italian, brought up Christian.  I was always taught to wipe with toilet paper or wipes.  I am now 50.  I converted to Muslim and part of the Muslim regimen when going to the bathroom, one or two is to take a container of water and wash both areas, every single time going to the bathroom.  Of course in public bathrooms it's more feasible to use  wipes, but saying that, if you wash with water and cleanse yourself every time you urinate or poop, you clean yourself and avoid any infections.  and of course washing your hands thoroughly after you use the facility.  I don't know if that helps but its what I've learned.

  49. Sissi Ravano profile image28
    Sissi Ravanoposted 13 months ago

    For ladies it is more exposed as for men, and it always worries me like crazy whenever I'm in public toilets. As for at home, I always make sure the lid is closed when I am flushing.

  50. iamvivek profile image60
    iamvivekposted 11 months ago

    Can you catch any infection from toilet water splash?
    ofcourse
    its possible but very unlikely

 
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