Do You Consider Writing Christmas as "Xmas" sacrilegious and why?

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  1. eHealer profile image85
    eHealerposted 5 years ago

    Do You Consider Writing Christmas as "Xmas" sacrilegious and why?

    Certain individuals have declined the spelling of XMAS as it used to be abbreviated, is this considered against Christianity and why is it not done anymore on an accepted basis?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7496466_f260.jpg

  2. Pennypines profile image60
    Pennypinesposted 5 years ago

    No, not sacriligious. but then I am not a fanatic about anything

    1. eHealer profile image85
      eHealerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      it's good not to be fanatical about anything, just think of all the energy you save!

  3. Michelle Hawkins profile image61
    Michelle Hawkinsposted 5 years ago

    I guess to each there own but for me, when I see Christmas written like xmas, it does seem sacreligious. It's taking Christ out of the word. Who knows though, maybe for some, it's just another way to simplify. We're always looking for ways to be more efficient, or lazy one.

    1. eHealer profile image85
      eHealerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's what I remember now~ People said it was taking the "christ" out of Christmas. Thanks!

    2. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Michelle you DO have a point. I know what is meant by our XMAS eve services are at 9 and 11PM, but Christ is removed from the name.  We've removed so much in the name of PC, we are becoming without an identity or a spine. I like the word CHRISTMAS!

    3. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Actually only a few have said that "X" (chi in Greek) said that its use takes the "Christ" out of Christmas, but they were led by evangelist Franklin Graham and CNN journalist Roland S. Martin.  It was in common usage before 1437.

    4. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It may have been common usage then, but what happened to the 600 years since then? Do we live in the past? I don't.

    5. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      teamrn: Christmas in the lsat 600 years has become increasingly commercial as the word has various meanings, whereas Xmas does not. There is nothing PC about Christmas--as it was a pagan holiday used to get drunk and receive presents.

  4. Highland Terrier profile image61
    Highland Terrierposted 5 years ago

    Really! taking Christ out of it?
    What is all the excess shopping, presents buying and stuffing of our faces doing?
    The very first time a Christmas card and present exchange hands Christ fled the scene.
    People have little to worry them.
    Xmas or Christmas what does it matter?

    1. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      What does it matter? It is the celebration of the birth of Christ; sure, we exchange gifts and celebrate the season, but taking Christ out of the season denigrates if and waters it down. And I'm a Sunday morning Christian!

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Christmas was an ancient Egyptian festival of magi(cians) that was adopted as a holiday for the Sun God (Sol Invictus) of the Roman Empire. Only after Constantine I created his "catholic [universal] church did it become popular: associated with Jesus

  5. duffsmom profile image60
    duffsmomposted 5 years ago

    It isn't sacrilegious as the X represents the Chi Rho which looks like an X with a P in the middle and represents the name Christ.  People who claim that Xmas is taking the Christ out of Christmas do not know the origin of it.

    1. Michelle Hawkins profile image61
      Michelle Hawkinsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Never claimed to "know the origin", didn't know you had to  just to discuss it.

    2. eHealer profile image85
      eHealerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Duffsmom, that's very interesting, I had no idea that's where it came from

    3. duffsmom profile image60
      duffsmomposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm sorry Michelle, my comment wasn't directed at you, I didn't actually read your comment until I posted my answer.  Sorry if I offended you-never my intent here.

    4. Michelle Hawkins profile image61
      Michelle Hawkinsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Duffsmom!

    5. Tusitala Tom profile image67
      Tusitala Tomposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      'cos...Xmas is a cross turned sideways...cross...Jesus...what's everyone one about?   Though I must admit, I usually use the full word.

    6. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Christmas is an uniquely English word.  In Spanish it is Navidad (nativity). The French have Noel (day of birth or birthday). To put it at December 25 is is the birthday for more than 70 gods: Mithras, Dionysus, etc. All were Christs (anointed).

  6. teamrn profile image66
    teamrnposted 5 years ago

    I wouldn't say that I was being sacrilegious, as much as I was being lazy. I don't like it when a church says 'our X-mas eve services are at ____________' . I know what they mean, but this is a revered date and celebration.

    1. profile image67
      Writer Chuckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Christ means the Messiah the savior. It seems that celebrating Xmas takes away from and demeans the celebration of ones Savior.  Would we be so willing to change in any way the name of a Muslim celebration? I don't think so.

    2. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Writer, way back when, when I was a babe  in the Hub-woods, you extended your hand. How have you been and thanks for bringing to light a different, AND VERY IMPORTANT, meaning. We must keep the Christ in Christmas, else we denigrate a special meaning

    3. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Christ in Hebrew means anointed (translation of Hebrew  māshīaḥ)  --as with David. It had nothing to do with savior but with a warrior. Christmas is old Egyptian for magical festivals and drinking wine made from water that later became blood..

  7. Christianbunny profile image59
    Christianbunnyposted 5 years ago

    It is out of gross ignorance that people think the "X" in Xmas means "x'ed out"! or sacrilege. Instead it signifies--it is the short form of-- the word "Christ." The "X" in our English "Xmas" is the same shape as the Greek alphabet letter X (pronounced "kye," spelled "chi," as in the old college-fraternity song titled "Sweetheart of Sigma Chi.") The Greek X is the initial letter in the word "Christ." So Xmas= Christ-mas. Ask your pastor! The reason this question comes up now is because in the past, up to the early 20th century, many schools taught their students ancient Greek, and American Christians weren't so eager as they are now to think their beliefs are being shortchanged and victimized.

    Another example of gross linguistic ignorance is people's insistence that "Potluck" be called "Pot Blessing." The word we spell "potluck" is properly spelled "potlach," the Chinook Indian word for a gift-giving festival or gift-giving competition. These festivals were part of Pacific Northwest Native American culture. The U.S. made them illegal. "Potluck" is simply an alternative spelling and has nothing to do with "luck" as we understand it.

    1. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Gross ignorance? Because Mensa members don't know one factoid that you know, that they don't, they're grossly ignorant? ,

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Education was far better before the 20th century (google 7000 drop out of school every day) as the USA is becoming less learned. If education required learning languages and history, there would less confusion. Religion stopped the conduct of inquiry

    3. bubba-math profile image58
      bubba-mathposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You don't have to be in Mensa to know that the X in Xmas stands for the Greek letter chi or the shape of a cross.  It's common knowledge.

  8. womenintouch profile image60
    womenintouchposted 5 years ago

    I know 't a lot of people will not say X-mas but what does X mean anyway? It means the Unknown and since Christ is the Unknow spirit force that we follow we do not nave to be so defensive when people say X-mas. If you choose to say Christmas that is great, but don't start a fight over one little word. Christ is in our heart and that is all that matters.

    1. profile image67
      Writer Chuckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Back in the 50's businesses were accused of taking the Christ out of Christmas to save advertizing dollars and window space. Room for more word space for last minut sales.  Christians complained and the word Christmas came back.

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In Latin Christ means "healer" and was a term for surgeons and pharmacists. It never was a name for the Jesus of the New Testament until after 325 CE (Eusebius, Vita Constantini, 36ff).

  9. Goody5 profile image64
    Goody5posted 5 years ago

    Christmas should always be spelled in the word's entirety, and here's an old hub from last year that explains why - http://theholestory.hubpages.com/hub/The-Word-Christmas

    1. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not true: O'Conner, Patricia T.; Kellerman, Stewart (2009). Origins of the Specious: Myths and Misconceptions of the English Language. New York: Random House. p. 77. Xmas is far older than Christmas.

    2. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      A little known factoid; why don't you make it well-known and WHY? Then we can all agree to use X-mas. Until then, I'm sticking with 'Christmas'

    3. Medievalist profile image60
      Medievalistposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The kindest thing I can say about that is that it is entirely ahistorical.

    4. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      To each his own and have a good Xmas or Christmas should be the golden rule. I am happy with either Xmas and also Christmas. Both nowadays have historical meaning.

  10. Rod Marsden profile image73
    Rod Marsdenposted 5 years ago

    Xmas has a cross in it. The X to be precise. A number of different crosses including X are symbols of Christianity.So what's the problem? If I were to draw a fish in front of the word mass would that also prove to be a difficulty for someone? How about live and let live at Christmas or Xmas? Voices of joy and of goodwill raised still strikes a cord with me.

    1. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Your average Joe does not know the meaning behind the X. Bottom line, we can shorthand and denigrate, or HONOR the day/date/meaning.

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Correct, as fish is ICTHUS and each letter was interpreted to mean "Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior": Iota+Chi+Theta+Upsilon+Sigma (IXOYE) to early followers of the Jesus message, but to Romans meant "fish".  It designated safe homes not Dec. 25.

    3. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I like the idea of a safe home.

    4. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The X cross was the St. Andrew's cross; before Justin Martyr's use of "cross" the Greek texts said that Jesus was crucified on a pole. Among other popular crosses, including in Buddhism, is the swastika as it means resurrection.

    5. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think you'll find the swashtika even older than that. It was part of the Indo-European movement.

  11. Radical Rog profile image77
    Radical Rogposted 5 years ago

    It's originally a pagan celebration of Saturnalia, the Rebirth of the Unconquered Sun. You could say that calling it Christmas or Xmas is sacrilegious to pagan belief.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'll go along with this. Forms of the cross are used in many pagan religions though possibly not in celebration of Saturnalia. The cross as a religious symbol predates Christianity.

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Jesus was not born Dec 25--as "shepherds were in the field" and at that time it rains. Moving the nativity was to remove the more popular festival of Saturnalia, Bacchus and the god Mithras and was pushed by the Greek court.

  12. Medievalist profile image60
    Medievalistposted 5 years ago

    No, I do not consider it at all sacrilegious. It is in fact quite religious; the X is Xmas is the Greek letter Chi, the first part of Christ's name, and it is an explicit reference to the Chi Rho page of Matthew in the Net Testament. I wrote about it here:

    http://etymons.blogspot.com/2012/12/chr … -xmas.html

    I further note that potluck is absolutely not derived from potlach. It is used in the fifteenth century by Thomas Nashe (s.v. OED) to refer to food provided for an unexpected guest, and it refers to the "luck of the pot," that is, the earlier custom have having a pot on the back of the stove that simmered constantly and provided soups and stews at need.

    1. teamrn profile image66
      teamrnposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not everyone knows or BELIEVES that Chi refers to Christ (CHI=CHR??)

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Potluck is not a medieval word.  It first appears in 1585, finds coinage in 1592, and is accepted throughout English speaking countries by 1595. It has nothing to do with Christmas.  Thomas Nashe (1567 – c. 1601) an English playwrite known for satir.

  13. B. Leekley profile image90
    B. Leekleyposted 5 years ago

    No. Using X to symbolize Christ dates back to the early history of the Christian church. X is a letter in the Greek alphabet and is the first letter in the Greek word for Christ. Google on Christ x to learn more. If and when an X is used to mean Christ, it should be used by Christians and other admirers of Christ reverently and not in vain.

    1. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches still use Xmas except in the USA, UK and a few other nations. Xmas has greater authority from 423 CE to today than does Christmas that referred to a festival of drinking. X and a fish were wellknown symbols.

  14. capon profile image60
    caponposted 5 years ago

    It seems to me that using the full "Christmas" gives a fuller and clearer meaning to what it is we are saying. Would this question have even been posed if the vast majority used the word in full?
    It might be the case that a little more effort, on our part, to say what we mean and to mean what we say, is only a good thing.
    I personally would not assume that many people know the relevant Greek and/or Latin where required, On the contrary, I think it a good thing if someone has a good grasp of English.
    Let me wish you all a very Merry Christmas!
    Tony

    1. Michelle Hawkins profile image61
      Michelle Hawkinsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Merry Christmas to you too!

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Since Anglo-Saxon England, Xmas was used--and remained in vogue until 1911. Christmas is relatively recent (if we do not go back to medieval English and then it refers to a religious service, not a birth). It would make far more sense to use Xmas.

    3. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In this day and age pleasing one's self as to whether you go for Xmas or Christmas is the best ticket. A lot of young people like Xmas because it is shorter.

  15. profile image51
    Michaelo1972posted 5 years ago

    CChristmas is entirely pagan in all of it's traditions. Pope Julius 1 declared the official date of "Christmas", or "Christ Mass" for December 25th 350 A.D. in attempt to convert Germanic & Scandinavian peoples to the "christian" faith. Northern Europe was the last region to accept "Christianity". Instead of irradicating pagan practices, "Christian" ideas were superimpossed apon pagan traditions. This did nothing, but administer paganism into the "Christianity"...
      Here is a few of the pagan origins, wich are now accepted into modern "Christianity":
      1. Winter Solstice (December 21st)
      2. Saturnalia (December 17th - 23rd). Romans cut trees and decorated with greenery in celebration to honor the sun god Saturn.
      3. Sol Invictus (December 25th) In 274 Emperor Aurilian designated December 25th as the festval dedicated to "the unconquered sun".
      4. Yule, or Yuletide (December 25th). Scandinavians celebrate the 12 day winter festival to honor Thor (the god of thunder). Jul (Yule) logs were lit.
      5. Germany celebrated Mitwinternacht (midwinter night) and the 12 Rauhnachte (harsh, or wild nights). This was a celebration of strong drink, games of chance, sexual promiscuity, and nudity.
      6. The importance of December 25th first began as the birthday of the god Mithras. A syncretic god of persian origin...

      Origen (an early father of the Christian church) condemed celebrating Christmas, as a pagan concept.
      Jeremiah, 10:2-4 forbids the cutting of trees and green and decorating them.
      Christmas was banned in 1647 and later overturned.
      Puritans of New Englan outlawed Christmas from 1659-1681.
      The other two Abrahamic religions (Judaism and Islam) strictly forbid the celebration of Christmas in any form, or even wishing a person "Happy, or Merry Christmas". Judaism still does not recognize (Yeshua, or Jesus in the latinized form) the comming of the "Messiah" (Christos in Greek form), or anointed one.
      Islam recognizes the prophet Isa (Jesus in Arabic and Aramaic form), but not as the son of God. Islam recognizes Isa as a man, who tought and healed the children of Isreal, and came for the sole purpose of re-establishing Mosaic law. He did not "die apon the cross", but was ascended into Jennah by the hand of Allah. A vollunteer was veiled to look. Like Isa and it was he that suffered death apon the cross.
      This is increddibly similar to the belieaf of the early Christians, before the council of Nicea.
    .
     

     
      ..

    1. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The Christmas tree was sacred to the god Odin. Giving presents a part of the worship of the god Saturn. Lighting candles honored the god Apollo and Sol Invictus. Caroling was for the goddess Minerva. Cattle lowed for god Apis. Virgin birth was Isis.

  16. nanderson500 profile image83
    nanderson500posted 5 years ago

    I don't think it was ever meant to be sacrilegious, but I have heard of people getting offended by it. Companies usually try to be as politically correct as possible so they are probably hesitant to use Xmas for this reason.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      One of the reasons to use Xmas would be to sock it to the political correctness bullies even though that really isn't in the spirit of Christmas.

    2. Dr. Arthur Ide profile image74
      Dr. Arthur Ideposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Xnas was used in commercial advertising (visit "Xmas" on wikipedia, long before "Christmas" appeared--as ads were charged by characters used (cold type) and has a far more ancient origin. Even church bulletins until 1923 used Xmas.

  17. profile image0
    Lybrahposted 5 years ago

    The whole point of Christmas is to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.  If you don't believe in Jesus, celebrating this holiday is pointless.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Read some of the above entries. Christ is not left out in Xmas. I take it if Christ is not left out in Xmas you don't have a problem with it.

  18. profile image48
    ieshab1posted 5 years ago

    I feel Christmas should  be with Christ in it because that's what it was meant to be not Xmas.This society had taken Christ out of everything even his day!! It's sad I stll say Merry Christmas!

    1. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Saying Merry Christmas is fine. Read some of the above entries and you will find that historically Xmas is very old and does not take Christ at all out of the equation.

  19. Audra18 profile image59
    Audra18posted 5 years ago

    Despite what people think about the origin of the big "X" in Xmas, it offends me something greatly and I'm sure it disgust God. If the x is no big deal, then why place it there anyways? Why not just spell out CHRISTmas? Christmas is the celebration of Christ when the Virgin Mary conceived him, yes, conceived, not gave birth to him. Christ was born in September, although I forget the exact date of it.

    Liberal thinking, pretending that something isn't wrong when it is while waving your hand away from it only makes matters worse. Think about it? Planned parenthood claim to help women out of sticky situations yet take the horrid act of murder on their hands and with each Christmas passing take new opportunities to sell 'Abornaments'. A disgusting way to celebrate Christmas. People are bending to the 'new ways' of thinking in this moderate age without even realizing the deception and evil ways it is bringing the population down.

    So we come back to the Xmas factor. It is only a new moderate way of thinking, silently taking the good out of things. Many examples, such as the schools; taking God and prayer out. Look at the outcome that has occurred? Death! Nothing good will ever come from this way of thinking.

    If your interested in the disgusting details of furthering your knowledge on parenthood, here is the website of the article:

    http://www.lifenews.com/2012/12/19/abor … ornaments/

  20. ruthclark3 profile image71
    ruthclark3posted 5 years ago

    I have never thought of it as  sacrilegious, just lazy.  I come from a family and culture who regard capital letters, punctuation, and grammar as Holy Writ.  smile  To shorten the word "Christmas" to "Xmas" is just plain lazy in my humble opinion.

  21. Lisa HW profile image66
    Lisa HWposted 5 years ago

    I, personally, don't think of it in terms of sacrilegious, but I can see why a lot of people would.  Having said that, though, I don't like seeing "Xmas".  I don't know...   Does it kill anyone to write out the whole word?  It's just kind of tacky looking, as far as I'm concerned.  The other one I don't like is "RIP".  Again, someone has died.  Will it kill anyone who wants to express that particular sentiment at such a time to write out the whole phrase?    No matter what someone believes, I think "Christmas" is a pretty looking word.  Why ugly it up by using the "X"....  (As for "rest in peace"...   It's most often a very heart-felt, meaningful, thing that people want to convey.  Why turn it into something that looks like a Halloween-decoration grave-stone... )   BUT...   maybe I'm just an oddball/stickler for thinking that the written word should try to be as pretty/meaningful as whatever it's representing.   hmm

  22. khaalidb profile image56
    khaalidbposted 5 years ago

    I, personally, don't think of it in terms of sacrilegious, but I can see why a lot of people would. Having said that, though, I don't like seeing "Xmas". I don't know... Does it kill anyone to write out the whole word? It's just kind of tacky looking, as far as I'm concerned. The other one I don't like is "RIP". Again, someone has died. Will it kill anyone who wants to express that particular sentiment at such a time to write out the whole phrase? No matter what someone believes, I think "Christmas" is a pretty looking word. Why ugly it up by using the "X".... (As for "rest in peace"... It's most often a very heart-felt, meaningful, thing that people want to convey. Why turn it into something that looks like a Halloween-decoration grave-stone... ) BUT... maybe I'm just an oddball/stickler for thinking that the written word should try to be as pretty/meaningful as whatever it's representing. hmm

    1. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Xmas is a lot older than you might think and it historically doesn't take Christ out of the picture though it appears that many present day people think that it does.

  23. Perspycacious profile image79
    Perspycaciousposted 3 years ago

    IXOYE  as I recall stands for Jesus Christ Lord of Heaven and Earth used centuries ago, and of course the sign of the fish was also used, much like the ribbons of today only horizontal.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image73
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. Good one. The sign of the fish...

 
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