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What is the plural of aircraft?

  1. Vellur profile image90
    Vellurposted 2 years ago

    What is the plural of aircraft?

    Is it aircrafts or just aircraft?

  2. Austinstar profile image88
    Austinstarposted 2 years ago

    It is aircraft. Although it would also be correct to say flying machines.

    1. alancaster149 profile image85
      alancaster149posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      'Flying machines' is a bit archaic, isn't it? Aircraft covers planes, helicopters/choppers, drones and spaceships - that we can also call 'spacecraft'. 'Craft', as applied to vessels was also the option taken early on for the flying variety.

    2. Vellur profile image90
      Vellurposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Austinstar thank you for answering my question.

  3. Zelkiiro profile image93
    Zelkiiroposted 2 years ago

    "Craft," when you're referring to vehicles, is both its own singular and plural forms, not unlike "deer" or "moose." This inconsistency with other plural words is just yet another example of why English is a terrible, terrible language, and something more consistent and logical like German or Japanese.

    Come to think of it, it's very interesting that some of the most consistent languages in the world were used by the Axis powers...

    1. alancaster149 profile image85
      alancaster149posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      French is labelled as a 'logical' language. The French were on both sides, Vichy with the Axis, Free French with the Allies.
      Anyway, with grammar as convoluted as French and German, I'd say English is a more logical language, with easier grammar

    2. Vellur profile image90
      Vellurposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Each language has its own ups and downs and each language is beautiful in a unique way. Thank you for answering.

      Thank you Alan Robert Lancaster for taking the time to reply.

  4. SgtCecil profile image92
    SgtCecilposted 2 years ago

    "Aircraft"

    The same word is used in both singular and plural situations. Think of an aircraft carrier. It can hold one or multiple aircraft.

    When it's important to express the plural, I use a different word instead of aircraft. You can also say the specific number (if you know it). For example: "That carrier is holding jets," or "That carrier is holding twenty Harriers."

    Wait a sec. Harrier, carrier. Hey, they rhyme!

    1. alancaster149 profile image85
      alancaster149posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It's a lot easier just saying 'aircraft'. We sold the US all our Harriers - stupid decision by the MoD - so the USN and USM carriers are all Harrier Carriers. Another British invention gone 'stateside'.

    2. Vellur profile image90
      Vellurposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you SgtCecil and Alan Robert Lancaster for clearing my doubt. Just saying aircraft is a lot easier I guess.

  5. Mel Carriere profile image92
    Mel Carriereposted 2 years ago

    Aircraft only.  The same word is plural or singular.  I boarded the aircraft.  The aircraft were all parked on the runway.

    1. Vellur profile image90
      Vellurposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Mel Carriere thank you for clearing my doubt.

 
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