How do you make moral decisions?

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  1. Dan Barfield profile image76
    Dan Barfieldposted 5 years ago

    How do you make moral decisions?

    In those situation where there is no such thing as a simple gut-instinct obvious 'right' thing to do... how do you decide how to act?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7728986_f260.jpg

  2. janshares profile image94
    jansharesposted 5 years ago

    Weigh the pros and cons of each decision. Ask yourself which can you live with, what are you willing to sacrifice, what can you tolerate. I know this is all cliche but the answer lies somewhere within knowing how well your conscience can find a way to remain intact with whatever decision you choose. In other words, do what you can stand.

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      How do you weigh up the pros and cons? how do you ascribe value?

    2. janshares profile image94
      jansharesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hard to answer without knowing the issue. Hard to place value on advantages and disadvantages of a decision that is very individual. Only you can decide if pros and cons cause sacrifice or benefits to you or someone else. Many layers.

  3. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    Hello Dan,
           I think if you have been instilled with a good moral fiber then you will act accordingly. For me, I am also convicted by God to do the right things. I am in no way implying that I am perfect, I am far from it, as are all human beings. We will slip up. The big question is will we feel badly for what has been done and correct it from happening again, or for some who seem to have no conscience repeat the same behavior over and over. I think we should learn from our mistakes and take them as a life lesson.

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hi there - thanks for dropping by smile I think that's not actually a bad approach. Do what you won't feel guilty about afterwards... of course this doesn't win in the old no-win situation of course... what then?

    2. Charlu profile image80
      Charluposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hey JThomp and Dan  I think that you know, it's not just the gut it's literally just knowing the difference of right and wrong. Then there's the old "Do unto others"  Truth be told paying it forward once and/or forgiveness would be change us all smile))

  4. alancaster149 profile image84
    alancaster149posted 5 years ago

    Gut feeling. There has to be something within you that tells you 'this is right'. You've got two options, 1 You sit on your hands and let somebody else sink or swim with it and when they fail say, 'I thought so'. Or 2. You can follow your instinct. It can take you down, in flames, or it can buoy you up and you beam in the limelight of your (not someone else's) success!
    Your success can take the moral high ground, and you might slip closely between conflicting ideas. I'm not saying here that the end justifies the means, but you mustn't let yourself get bogged down by pure idealism - 'here be dragons' is no longer a road sign to beware of meeting. They're just civil servants with bad breath!

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      What if gut feeling takes you the wrong way? Righteous anger can make people make snap decisions...

  5. phoenixelliot profile image60
    phoenixelliotposted 5 years ago

    I put my motives to the test. Are my motives pure, are they aligned with the greatest good of all involved? I believe the right choice becomes pretty obvious if I am being honest with myself, and judging the situation dispassionately. This isn't always easy, and at times i find myself toeing the line a little bit.

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is a Kantian style choice and I have to say these ones always appealed to me more than Utilitarian ideals. Motive and intention are good things to go on. Even if the result is bad - it was right to do in some way if your intentions were pure.

    2. phoenixelliot profile image60
      phoenixelliotposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think so as well. I believe that if my intentions are pure, and I make the right choice and make it intelligently with tact and consideration my conscience is clear. I have created no negative Karma and have been compassionate to myself and others.

  6. wilderness profile image97
    wildernessposted 5 years ago

    Although each circumstance is different, for the most part the answer lies in what the effect will be on others.

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I like that answer wilderness. Very simple and very interesting at the same time... what sense would it make to worry about moral decision if there was no "other" to affect?

    2. phoenixelliot profile image60
      phoenixelliotposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Compassion is a great virtue.

  7. CrescentSkies profile image86
    CrescentSkiesposted 5 years ago

    I just do whatever feels right. I really don't care if something's written down as wrong in a law book or some text, if it doesn't feel wrong to me I have no problems doing it if I can't get in trouble for it.

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Do you think there is a natural moral "good and bad" then? That  this "gut feeling" is the same for everyone?

    2. CrescentSkies profile image86
      CrescentSkiesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think there are some similarities but just as many differences. For instance, I think drug addicts should be used as experimental subjects for lab testing. They're already killing themselves, might as well use them for something.

    3. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Having been there in a minor way myself I have to say that's a bit of an objectionable remark... however good humored. Drug addicts are normal people who have lost thei way a bit. Don't judge others till you've walked a mile in their shoes my friend.

    4. phoenixelliot profile image60
      phoenixelliotposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have to admit for a moment I was, as a recovering addict, pretty offended by that remark, but I realize you may not be well informed on the subject of addiction. Please feel free to read the hubs I have written on recovery. Enlighten yourself.

    5. CrescentSkies profile image86
      CrescentSkiesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You may have recovered from your addiction but that doesn't absolve you of your crime. In my eyes since you knowingly fed money into criminal organizations you share responsibility for the murders they commit. I don't think it's unfair either.

    6. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting... I actually have a lot to say on this subject and it's far too big to discuss in these word-limited comment boxes. I take your point  to some extent... but in the end I disagree. A hub shall be forthcoming...

  8. lilmissmontana profile image84
    lilmissmontanaposted 5 years ago

    I typically weigh out the pros and cons of each decision.

    Recently, I had a very difficult decision to make. What would you do in this situation?

    My VERY good friend has recently decided to start working out with me. She is quite a bit overweight, at five foot she weighs nearly 200 pounds. She pushed for one day and she was sore and out of breath, understandably. When we met the next day she gave up halfway through each set of reps. Within a couple days she wasn't doing half of the workout.

    Let me remind you, I AM NOT A PERSONAL TRAINER! She brought it to my attention that she hadn't lost any weight. She also goes out to the bars and drink quite a bit of beer.

    How, as a friend, do you tell someone they have to push harder to get results? How can I explain that her food and drink habits are only negatively impacting her weight loss goal?

    Eventually, I decided not to say anything at all and let her do what she wants. It's her choice and if working out makes her feel good, then it's not my place to tell her how to do it. Is this an acceptable way to handle this situation in your eyes?

    1. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In the end it is everyone's own responsibility to take care of their body. In that situation I would maybe give them some literature or a documentary on the subject. It's easy to be patronising without realising it so I'd signpost them to an expert.

    2. lilmissmontana profile image84
      lilmissmontanaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I really want to help her and see her be healthy, but, like you said, that isn't my job.  I don't want her to feel like I'm insulting her, because I think when she pushes herself she is great and working super hard. I wish I could explain it to her.

    3. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The only advice I could give would be to make encouraging comments when she's trying, but don't when she isn't. Consistent rewards for positive behavior and nothing for negative behavior. You never need to criticize her - she'll do that for herself.

    4. lilmissmontana profile image84
      lilmissmontanaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for that big of advice. That makes a lot of sense. It's not my place and I understand that now. Damn being a overbearing friend!

    5. Dan Barfield profile image76
      Dan Barfieldposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There's nothing overbearing about your demeanor at all! Your concern for your friend is obvious - and you are only looking for ways to help her because you care. Your actions are commendable.

    6. lilmissmontana profile image84
      lilmissmontanaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you! She is practically my family.

 
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