This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (82 posts)

What's God got to do with it?

  1. Paraglider profile image94
    Paragliderposted 7 years ago

    "Let us remember that we can do these things not just because of wealth or power, but because of who we are:  one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

    Thank you.  May God bless you.  And may God bless the United States of America."


    It would appear that a combined Intelligence and Military exercise resulted in the death of someone who is none the worse for a good killing! But invoking God seems less than helpful, as it will be interpreted by radical Islamists as "Our God's better than your God". It will further fuel that fire. Wouldn't it be better to acknowledge that God takes no interest whatsoever in national and international affairs (as is borne out by history) and keep all such pronouncements strictly secular?

    1. profile image60
      C.J. Wrightposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Seems to contradict the US stance of, "We are not at war with Islam." However, reference to god or not, there are those that will use this death as a means to rally others to their cause. No real winners here.

      1. Paraglider profile image94
        Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Agree completely.

        1. Donna Suthard profile image74
          Donna Suthardposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I agree with you, God is pretty well neutral about all the shenanigans that goes on, on planet earth!! He's just waiting for us to play out our parts, and wake up, from the dream.People want to play the vengeance game, an eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth. They still believe their killing for God! They sure forgot about the commandment to LOVE...

          1. Paraglider profile image94
            Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            So neutral, in fact, that it's hard to make a convincing case that he is there at all. hat's why it's better to leave him out of political rhetoric.

    2. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Nothing actually. The position of President is all about perception and deception. Nothing more.

    3. Ralph Deeds profile image61
      Ralph Deedsposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      "What's God got to do with it?"

      Good question. I would prefer that public office holders leave God out of their public pronouncements. It strikes me as pandering to the religious right.

    4. aguasilver profile image77
      aguasilverposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      errr.... any Christian will tell you that God appoints those who govern us, they may be bad governors, but that's our choice in the issue.

      They all answer to God for the decisions they take on our behalf.

      Secularists have every right to ignore this, but it changes not one jot or tittle of Gods power.

      For the record the UK is not a country that has separation of church and state, all elected governments swear allegiance to the Crown, whose head is also the Head of the official church of that country.

      Limited though the Crowns powers may be, they (the King or Queen) still hold the power of veto on ANY law or decision made.

      It would be extremely unlikely that they would exercise that power, in a parliamentary democracy, however it is equally unlikely that should the Queen be displeased with a particular government concept, the government would chose to pursue it, thereby causing a constitutional crisis.

      Witness the fervour over this last weekend, as a huge number of people turned out to support a Royal Wedding.

      3 billion people watched it worldwide.

      Personally, without a body, I suspect that Osama Bin Laden (who has long been a CIA operative) is probably now in retirement somewhere quiet, never to be seen again as he once appeared, and as he is now officially dead, no longer hunted.

      He served his purpose, especially propping up a defunct President by his timely death, and now they wish to close the issue.

      1. livelonger profile image94
        livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        For most Americans, the idea that a country has an official church is bizarre. Several "secular" European countries do.

        England
        Norway
        Denmark
        Greece
        Iceland

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_o … igions.svg

        1. Paraglider profile image94
          Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          True, but these established churches go way back in history and were established mainly as political bulwarks against the power of Rome. Modern European custom and practice is for political leaders to avoid invoking God in their speeches.

          1. earnestshub profile image88
            earnestshubposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            I agree. I can't recall any European leader mentioning a god in their speeches.
            Our Parliament still say a christian prayer before opening and invoke a god, yet we are a mainly secular society with a non religious prime minister, which I find amusing. smile A hangover from Westminster law.

            1. livelonger profile image94
              livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              And yet it's not odd to have a mainstream party called the "Christian Democrats" or "Christian Socialists" in several European countries.

              Maybe mentioning "God" seems gratuitous in that case.

          2. livelonger profile image94
            livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Sure, but the threat of Rome is long gone. Now having a state church is anachronistic. It seems these countries should do away with them, especially in none of them can those official churches speak on behalf of all citizens.

      2. Paraglider profile image94
        Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        As a point of order, the Church of England is established in England. The Scottish and Irish churches are not. The C of E is almost absent from three of the four 'United' Kingdoms.

        As for your assertion that any Christian will tell me that our leaders are appointed by God, etc.  I think that wholly misrepresents Christianity. I think only a rather extreme and mercifully small proportion believes any such thing.

        1. aguasilver profile image77
          aguasilverposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Romans 13:1
          LET EVERY person be loyally subject to the governing (civil) authorities. For there is no authority except from God [by His permission, His sanction], and those that exist do so by God's appointment.

          The bible would seem to disagree with your belief that the number who subscribe to God given authority is mercifully small.

          I would agree that most of those in Churchianity possibly are unaware this verse even exists, or like secularists attempt to ignore it, however, it's scripture and it stands, and 'mercifully' there is nothing the secular world can do about it.

          The rest of the 'United Kingdom' whatever church they belong to (or none) still swear allegiance to the Queen, and as such accept the authority of Her church in their lives.

          I seem to remember Henry VIII had quite a thing about oaths of allegiance, and charges of treason for refusing them.

          1. Paraglider profile image94
            Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Sorry, but trotting out a verse written by Paul in a letter to early Roman churches doesn't constitute an argument. You are also failing to distinguish between venerable customs which are hard to repeal (but are universally ignored) and modern de facto customs and practices, among which is the fact that European political leaders do not invoke God.

            1. livelonger profile image94
              livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Just because it's hard to repeal doesn't mean it shouldn't be. If the tradition is universally ignored anyway, then shouldn't it make it easy? I'm sure the atheists, Hindus, Catholics, Muslims, Jews, and other religious minorities wouldn't object.

              1. Paraglider profile image94
                Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                Yes of course, but as it is ignored anyway and as there are always many more pressing issues to address, disestablishment is pretty low down the priority list. Focusing on it might risk stirring up the dormant religious right. We can do without that!

                1. livelonger profile image94
                  livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  So it's better to let the religious right have their meaningless government-endorsed symbolism, even if it annoys lots of people and is exclusionary, since there are more important things to work on.

                  Sounds reasonable to me.

                  What was the OP about again? wink

                  1. Paraglider profile image94
                    Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                    It's quite difficult and wasteful of parliamentary time to change legislation. It's very easy for a speaker to moderate his language.

      3. Donna Suthard profile image74
        Donna Suthardposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        yes, his ratings went down!  After all he was idolized as some sort of messiah, before he went into office..The people put their hopes in him...and of course he took a great fall, as all idols do He didn't know what he was doing..he was too inexperienced..

    5. Bibowen profile image96
      Bibowenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      This is much ado about nothing. No one thinks that President Obama is going to invoke a holy war with Muslim states with the paltry religious expressions he invokes. And if you're right and this is something we need to be concerned about, then watching our tongue isn't going to work because if they can be provoked by such windy platitudes, they will be provoked by anything.

      1. Paraglider profile image94
        Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        It's not just about provoking the militant Islamists. It's also about exclusivity. If the President wants to unify citizens around this event, he'd be better to use inclusive language.

        1. Bibowen profile image96
          Bibowenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          American presidents have been invoking the Almighty since George Washington for all kinds of projects, especially military actions. The people that are put off by such comments are mostly hyper-sensitive atheists who protest every time they hear the G-word.

          Besides, being "inconclusivistic" isn't an Article II function! And one factor that has been important in uniting the American people is the acknowledgment of God. This is why He is invoked so often by politicians.

          1. Paraglider profile image94
            Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            And has He stepped into the fray? If yes, please give examples. If no, which is the more likely: that He is impartial in war, or that He doesn't exist?

            1. Bibowen profile image96
              Bibowenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Go back and look at your own quotes. These have nothing to do with actual actions on the part of God in relation to war. In the one, he's quoting the Pledge of Allegiance (I'm surprised he knows it) and the second is a sign off that presidents often give in speeches which boils down to "God Bless America."

              You really have to be looking for a fight to think that those innocuous platitudes are going to divide the nation or launch a new phase on the ongoing jihad.

              1. Paraglider profile image94
                Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                I was responding to your post, and your reference to 'all kinds of projects, especially military action'

                1. Bibowen profile image96
                  Bibowenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  Fair enough...

                  And I was simply trying to place the president's remarks in a historical context, not make some actual statement about God's workings in US relations. The theistic references have been historically non-divisive and unremarkable.

                  Sometimes I get the impression, given the president's level of hubris, that his references to the Deity are references to himself, in which case, I'd be worried too.

              2. profile image60
                C.J. Wrightposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                I would ask you three questions to help clarify.

                First: Do you believe that the GWOT is a religous war from the US perspective?

                Second: Do you believe that the GWOT is a religous war from Al Queada's perspective?

                Third: Do you believe that the GWOT is a religous war?

                1. Bibowen profile image96
                  Bibowenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  #1--Not in the way that historians use that term, but it does have religious dimensions to it.
                  #2--Absolutely
                  #3--No, but it doesn't matter what I think. If Al Quaeda thinks it is, we may have a religious war thrust upon us, whether we wish it or not.

                  1. profile image60
                    C.J. Wrightposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                    Your answer to #3 is key. They do see it that way. Because this is true, why should the US encourage the idea by peppering their rhetoric with references to God? Especially if it implies that God has chosen sides and that side is America. It only supplies fodder for the extremist.

                    Having said that, I'll say this. The speach was made by an American to Americans. In that respect, it shouldn't matter.

    6. RachaelLefler profile image97
      RachaelLeflerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I think he was aiming those closing remarks at the wild crowd that was chanting "USA!" and celebrating. You can't speak well without a clear concept of your audience, and Obama is a very smart public speaker. If those people had been Satanists he'd have said "Thank Satan for this glorious victory!" It had nothing to do with God and everything to do with pandering to his largely Christian audience.

  2. recommend1 profile image71
    recommend1posted 7 years ago

    I guess that omitting reference to a god would have the less bright half the US up in arms also. 

    Adding further fuel to the modern day crusade initiated by the Bush family would be totally in line with the aims of fundamentalism and the Vatican.

  3. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 7 years ago

    I agree.

    I also think some will lose their lives because of it.
    Unfortunately Americans will not tolerate a President who leaves this sort of language out of such speeches.

    1. Ron Montgomery profile image60
      Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Plus,  it's a slap in the face to the one true god - FSM.  Thankfully, Pastafarians are pacifists.

  4. Paraglider profile image94
    Paragliderposted 7 years ago

    Tony Blair was the first British PM in modern times to claim God's support for UK foreign policy. It felt like a regression to the bad old days of holy wars. It's completely unnecessary and contrary to the separation of church and state.

    1. recommend1 profile image71
      recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      This was the most unbelievable part of the whole UK end of the Iraq fiasco.  I have come to believe that as a devout Catholic, Blair was directly influenced by the Pope, the same pope who, at the same time, made a proclamation deeply offensive to Muslims.

      1. Paraglider profile image94
        Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Wasn't he a closet catholic at the time? From what I remember he defected to Rome from C of E after leaving office.

        1. recommend1 profile image71
          recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I thought he was always catholic myself.  I don't usually keep up much but I do tend to look new kids on the world block quite thoroughly smile

          1. Paraglider profile image94
            Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            December 2007, he finally converted, apparently:
            http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/commen … 086753.ece

            1. recommend1 profile image71
              recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Well I learn something new every day.  Devout christian, war on Islam, lucky that blood on his hands can be washed off with a few words from a priest huh !

  5. livelonger profile image94
    livelongerposted 7 years ago

    Playing the devil's advocate... (even though I personally don't like anything religious invoked by politicians)

    Who's saying the US is the only nation under God?
    Who's saying Christians, Jews and Muslims don't worship the same God?
    Who's arguing that only the US should be blessed by God?

    I can understand not liking any religious reference being made by a government leader, but I don't think that there was ever any understanding of exclusivity. Obama's made clear in several speeches that the God that Muslims and Christians pray to is the same one, even if they use different names.

    1. SparklingJewel profile image76
      SparklingJewelposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      ..so right Livelonger!

      the unity in our diversity on the whole "God" issue is what is important, not the religious dogma.

      and what has God got to do with it?   well, everything is of God, all energy that is and forms mater is God, so "Everything" has got to do with it! big_smile

      1. livelonger profile image94
        livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        ...as long as some religious believers don't abuse the meaning, and unfortunately some have. Some have taken "One nation, under God" not to be an opinion, but a mandate that our country explicitly follow Christian values, a Christian version of sharia. (I've heard/read that many, many times)

        Avoiding the language altogether would help avoid that, but there are plenty of Americans who are suspicious of Obama unless he says "God" every 3rd or 4th word. smile

        1. Mighty Mom profile image83
          Mighty Momposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          True dat.
          Unlike Trump, who says "f#%k" every 3rd or 4th word.
          I think even the most diehard secularists and atheists would prefer "One Nation Under God, Indivisible..." to "F you!"

          1. Paraglider profile image94
            Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            One is gratuitously offensive. The other is patronising. The gratuitously offensive is easier to deprecate, but the patronising leaves a bad taste for a long time.

            Secular is best.

          2. hottopics profile image58
            hottopicsposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Mighty,

            I am not a believer. But I give respect to all that worship no matter what God they pray to. When people pray in my presencelike at diner, funerals or any other reason, I bow my head and SHUTUP! I deeply respect the words  "One Nation Under God, Indivisible..." for those were the beliefs of the founding fathers of this great nation. It is also the foundation of our laws. We are the melting pot, learn to respect each others views. If congress could do that they could solve the issues facing our nation.

            1. livelonger profile image94
              livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              No, it wasn't. It was created a little over a hundred years ago, long after the founding fathers had died, and the "under God" part was added in the 1950s.

      2. Paraglider profile image94
        Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        But that is a matter of opinion. There are many agnostics and atheists out there who would not concur.

        1. SparklingJewel profile image76
          SparklingJewelposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          ...one's dogma is not always of the religious defined nature...

          at the core of beliefs of what "IS" or "IS NOT", God as the order and structure of the Universe and how it works doesn't change just because any particular person says so one way or the other

          1. Paraglider profile image94
            Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            You see. I would prefer to omit two words, and say:
            at the core of beliefs of what "IS" or "IS NOT", the order and structure of the Universe and how it works doesn't change just because any particular person says so one way or the other.

            (Because the case for God being equivalent to and also distinguishable from 'the order and structure of the Universe' is not proven.)

            1. SparklingJewel profile image76
              SparklingJewelposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              ...but when said the way I said it, with the word God intact, I am not taking sides or saying any one side is right or wrong...your way stills says one is right and one is wrong

              1. Paraglider profile image94
                Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                I don't see it that way at all. I see it as not closing an open question. We all know there is a Universe. We don't all know there is a God. So let's not enlist others into our belief systems without their consent.

                1. SparklingJewel profile image76
                  SparklingJewelposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  ...but that is exactly what is happening when God is omitted... smile

    2. Paraglider profile image94
      Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      And is he in a position to make that assertion? I don't think political office qualifies anyone to enumerate deities. Better to steer well clear.

      1. livelonger profile image94
        livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I agree it's a better idea to steer clear, but you do have to do the whole "God & country" thing to get elected president in this country, unfortunately.

        And it doesn't matter if he's in the position to assert that Christians and Muslims pray to the same God. He's on the record recognizing it that way, so when he mentions God, he clearly doesn't mean "the Christian God, and not the Muslim God."

        1. Paraglider profile image94
          Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I know. And until that changes (and not just in America) there will be no peace in the World.'clearly' to you, as a sophisticated listener, but not to the many who will interpret 'God' to mean the Christian God of USA.

          1. livelonger profile image94
            livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            There will be plenty of war and violence even after we move beyond the whole "God and country" thing. Peace does not hinge on stopping pandering to the overtly religious and patriotic, unfortunately.
            I suppose so. But those people are inclined to hear/believe what they want anyway.

            1. Paraglider profile image94
              Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              I know. There are many factors. Recognising that one among them is not unique is not reason not to discourage it.

            2. rebekahELLE profile image88
              rebekahELLEposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              And that will never, ever change.

    3. Donna Suthard profile image74
      Donna Suthardposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Thats a good point.. I was thinking of that earlier..God, being God, would love everyone equally and unconditionally!

  6. prettydarkhorse profile image64
    prettydarkhorseposted 7 years ago

    It is an expected "kind of speech", sort of "God Bless America" and  it is what people want to hear. According to the latest data, here in the US, there are 181 M out of 228 M adult population who are still believers. As of the latest census (2010), US has 308 M plus total population.

    1. Paraglider profile image94
      Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Most UK folk cringe a little at the God bless America rhetoric. It comes across either as phony or as confrontational. Personally I don't see any evidence for a God, but that aside, I think many of the World's problems have come from nations seconding God to their cause.

      1. prettydarkhorse profile image64
        prettydarkhorseposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Hi Dave, long way to go here in the US specially with the increase in the numbers of Latin immigrants which are predominantly Christians (Catholic). In fact, the number of believers in diff Christian denomination here is increasing if you compare data in three periods (the latest 2008), not a bit decreasing. In most part of Europe this is not the case. Religion, we may argue caused conflict in different times through history but its advantages lie in serving as cohesive factor in families and value formation. While of course it is debatable, it may take more time (not in our lives) for people to really move away from an organized religion. Religion put some order in societies - i.e., in forming laws (part of culture). It is a nations part of being and becoming. It is what others live for. Now when you go extremes, it is a different story. It is not religion that caused conflict, the people and their greediness.

        Data - self identified religion USA - 3 different periods - US Census -  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/ … 1s0075.pdf

        1. DTR0005 profile image82
          DTR0005posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Well-said PDH and thanks for the data.

    2. Beelzedad profile image54
      Beelzedadposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      An interesting and valid point.

      Islam guides Muslims political decisions as much as it does their private lives. Their vast differences in religious doctrines amongst their own will probably also equate to their own internal political differences. They most likely also wish to hear speeches with "Allah Bless Wherever" because that too is what they want to hear.

      And, if the religious believers of America want to hear "God Bless America" then they too are mostly guided by their own internal differing religious beliefs in their political lives.

      If both were true for the majority, then the Crusades and the Islamic Conquests are still very much alive and well, and evidently kicking. smile

  7. Mighty Mom profile image83
    Mighty Momposted 7 years ago

    That's Obama speaking to a deeply divided American people using language that appeals to his detractors, who, notwithstanding the significance of this achievement, will look for ANY possible fissure to discredit our president.
    If he had failed to invoke God (in the words of our Pledge of Allegiance and the words of one of our patriotic songs -- which, btw, has been sung at the 7th inning of baseball games since 9/11), he would have been criticized soundly.
    Correction: Even MORE soundly than he is being criticized for "taking the credit" (hello -- he's doing his job as commander-in-chief).
    Of course, he did not defeat the entire alQaeda operation, and he has no actual "body" to present as proof, so he is still a commie failure to some critics. sad
    *pitiful*

    1. livelonger profile image94
      livelongerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, very much true.

  8. ahorseback profile image76
    ahorsebackposted 7 years ago

    Some people just can't separate  the belief in God ,in America , and the fact that we can still  believe in God and have a free and fair form of government not run by religions of any kind. Isn't, "One nation under God"  who we are and Not! how we govern our nation.?

  9. ahorseback profile image76
    ahorsebackposted 7 years ago

    And, I have certain strengths , But I would find it hard to stand on the wall of freedoms vigilance and think that I was defending those  who don't believe in a god or a country , especially your own country. Such are the free spending ways of atheists of all of our freedoms. No committment ,no sacrice , just the enjoyments of freedoms rewards.........

    1. Paraglider profile image94
      Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      That's your issue, not mine. Whether you like it or not, atheists, agnostics, Christians, Hindus, Muslims, Jews, etc, etc - if they are citizens of a 'free' country, should be equal under the law. There are plenty of countries where this does not apply. If you've ever lived in such a country you'd understand better how undesirable it is.
      Freedom means freedom. It doesn't mean 'freedom only if you think like me'.

    2. John Holden profile image59
      John Holdenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      What utter tosh!

      I'm an atheist and don't need a god to have commitment to my country.

  10. ahorseback profile image76
    ahorsebackposted 7 years ago

    You asked ," Whats God got to do with it" , I answer anything or nothing , what does it matter to an atheist. Does it matter to you that the President is a christian? If he says "God bless America", why do you care? Had he said "Praise be to Allah" , would you question that ?  I think not somehow!  A little P.C. over there? Perhaps he should have said "Praise be to Ralph Nader, that would be ok with you!

    1. Paraglider profile image94
      Paragliderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Your posts are very silly big_smile

  11. Mindtrapz profile image61
    Mindtrapzposted 7 years ago

    Whether the President says the name "God" really doesnt matter when you are talkin abou tterrorist. They will still thik that America is bad and they are good. Im sure there are some al quada sitting at a picnic bench saying..."damn them americans, I use to like them until they said God." No they will try to harm us even if we claimed islam as our national religion!

  12. Paraglider profile image94
    Paragliderposted 7 years ago

    Rachael and Livelonger - I think you're both saying that really it's all about electioneering. If so, then I do agree with you.

    Mindtrapz - International terrorism is fueled by foreign policy, just as domestic terrorism is fueled by domestic policy. The answer to both is to amend policy, not to wage phony wars.

  13. Will Apse profile image91
    Will Apseposted 7 years ago

    Religion is the great soother. Just think how crazy the average citizen would be without the solace it offers.

    Also Christianity and the great Liberal Tradition are the only forces that prevent Western culture from being absolutely monstrous.

    So why not be reminded of it in a speech...

  14. Paraglider profile image94
    Paragliderposted 7 years ago

    Good answer too. In fact we're touching on a deeper point. If America, and hence its President, would style itself as the leader of the 'free' world, then it has to attune to the socio-political norms of that world, which is increasingly secular. There's no way that US will lead the West back to a religious politics. On the other hand, if US wants to be more insular, even isolationist, then it has no such responsibility to other countries. But that would be a shame.

    1. profile image60
      C.J. Wrightposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I'm torn on the issue regarding America being the "leader of the free world" or returning to a more isolationist stance on foriegn policy. Our current economic situation seems to indicate that it would be beneficial to turn inward. However, I can't ignore the economic impact that our current foriegn policy has had on the world economy. Basically it's a decision between a interventionist and isolationist foriegn policy ideology. A happy medium might be best for now. A drastic change now could lead to a world wide economic colapse and even world war.

 
working