Now WHAT!

Jump to Last Post 1-4 of 4 discussions (29 posts)
  1. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/8907629.png
    To all New Jerseyans out there, there are so many interestingly THINGS in your state such as Clinton Road.  Yes, THAT road in which according to legend and theories, one DARE NOT to go at NIGHT!   Then there is the so-called Jersey Devil.   My oh MY!   Now, there is the DEVIL'S TREE.   It is said to be the portal to hell and if one touches it, WOE be to him/her.   Have YOU seen and/or heard of such legends or do YOU believe it is a lot of boogaboo nonsense?

    1. Alastar Packer profile image81
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Youtube has a lot of Jersey Devil videos. Some are obviously fake. However, where is that infared film of it taken in the last year or so? That didn't look so fake.

      1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
        Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this
        1. Alastar Packer profile image81
          Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Eerie, Phyllis, thanks. The one i'm talking about was taken about a couple hundred feet away at night in the forest and looked like the general descriptions of it. Darn, wish we could find it 'cause it is very convincing and amazing.smile

          1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
            Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            Wow! I would like to see that, Alastar. I will go search some more. Was it moving?

          2. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
            Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            Wow !  I would like to see that one, Alastar. I will go search some more. Was the creature moving or still?

      2. Alastar Packer profile image81
        Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Where are all the true believers and die-hard skeptics with their confirmation bias on this one?!

        1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
          Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Alastar, this Clinton Road would be good for your site. We should get an article up there for your readers. Lots of strange things take place there. Have you ever been in that area?  It would be awesome to explore that.

          1. Alastar Packer profile image81
            Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            I like a lady writer who can take a subtle hint and run with it. You know where to land and get all the incoming trimmings.smile

            1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
              Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

              Well, alrighty then -- guess I tripped right into that pot hole, huh?  Looks like I have my work cut out for me the day or two. Yes, as long as I tripped, might as well land in the right place.  wink

    2. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
      Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      My gosh, GM -- I just looked up legends of Clinton Road. Now that is one spooookay place for sure, what with the ghost boy throwing coins back up when someone tosses one in the water. And the ghost truck that follows vehicles. Then the strange wolf-like creatures and hell-hounds!  I do not think I would like to go there at night, for sure.

      Now, what about this devil tree thing?

      1. gmwilliams profile image85
        gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        According to the legend, many nefarious events occurred regarding the tree such as lynchings by the KKK.  The legend stated that the vicinity surrounding the tree was a strong KKK stronghold- bad karma there.   There is another legend which indicated that the tree is a portal to hell and that anyone who dares touch the tree will have a permanent black dust on their hands.  Also, it was purported that demons guard the tree to prevent someone from cutting it down.   Furthermore, it is stated that if someone dares to tamper with the tree, there is a TRUCK which will ran them off the road, eeeeerie, boogetyboogetyBOOOOOO!

        1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
          Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Goooood Grief !!!!  Poor tree was just growing there, minding its own business when it was turned into a disastrous legend.

  2. Alastar Packer profile image81
    Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago

    It was filmed in infared apparently deep in the Pine Barrens and seemed to move some. I don't know all the details but sure would like to get a gander at it again- thanks, Phyllis!

    1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
      Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I tried to find the video, but that ol' Jersey devil is just too elusive, Alastar. There is one good video of a mother and son who saw the creature, took pictures of its foot prints in snow, had lie detector tests, paranormal researchers, the monster hunt team tried to thrush the creature out of the forest, -- a very convincing story,the best one I have seen, but, again no solid proof.

      1. Alastar Packer profile image81
        Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Shucks, Phyllis, thanks for trying'. If I ever see it again will certainly let you know.

        1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
          Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Well, I am thinking the Jersey devil must be an unusually large 'wapacuthu'.

          1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
            Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            Or it very possibly could be a Tlanuwa -- which is a giant bird of prey with impenetrable metal feathers, from Cherokee mythology.

            1. Alastar Packer profile image81
              Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

              Holy Superior Phyllis! You sure know your Appalachian and Cherokee legends. I think your making the right choice and you know what I mean by that. Had to look those two up. So,the Tlanuwa is more regular bird-like and the wapacuthu is more owl-like?

              1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
                Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

                Exactly, Alastar. The wapacuthu (sounds like Cherokee name - archaic name) is the Bubo virginianus virginianus which is the Common Great Horned Owl. If you look at the pic on wiki, the CGHO looks very much like a creature that could frighten people at night. The wing span of a female can be up to 5 feet, and the tracks I saw in the video with the mother and son are similar to the three toed Owl. Plus it has those eerie huge yellow eyes.  The Tlanuwa is more bird-like according to the Cherokee myth.

                And yes, I do know what you mean -- thank you for that, my friend.

          2. Alastar Packer profile image81
            Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            A few tried to explain away the Mothman of Point Pleasant as an extraordinary-sized owl. What an exploded theory. I don't know any owls who can keep up with cars going 70+ miles an hour for one thing.

            1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
              Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

              Now that is exploded for sure. I have watched owls fly and they do not go that fast. It is funny when they take off, they are so heavy they swoop down afore they get the wind under their wings. Beautiful in their own way.

  3. grand old lady profile image85
    grand old ladyposted 4 years ago

    In the Philippines there was a story about a lady in white on a particular street. There were always stories they heard from others, but no first person accounts. The stories got wilder over time, with the lady knocking on doors, screaming, disappearing as your car crashed into her. But I think that urban legend no longer exists., although the street is still there.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image81
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      One of the best people and poets HP has ever seen had an upfront and personal 'lady in white' experience in Kentucky that literally changed his life...and became his muse. At the Chickamauga battlefield in N Georgia there's a 'lady in white' whose reported by tourists from all over the world, most of whom know nothing of her legend. Park Rangers have seen her, too.  Not New Jersey but there you go.

      1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
        Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        It really is too bad he left HP. I have lost touch with him. I hope he is still writing.

        1. Alastar Packer profile image81
          Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          He is, Phyllis. Believe he's on G+ and his own site. Unbelievably good what this poet can create and what a muse he's got too inspire. Im super glad his story was in M&M book one. Talked about him on a Hollywood interview for the book, too, and was most pleased to do so.

          1. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
            Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks, Alastar, I will look him up. What a great story for M&M.

    2. Phyllis Doyle profile image94
      Phyllis Doyleposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Lady, there are so many sightings and legends about a "lady in white" that there must be some truth in it. I did not know there are similar legends in the Philippines, too. That is very interesting.

      New Jersey and the Appalachian regions abound with legends like this and many others.

  4. Alastar Packer profile image81
    Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago

    Uh-huh gifted one. I meant the road. We talk later.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)