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Do you believe alcoholism can be cured by the power of God?

  1. dickb profile image61
    dickbposted 6 years ago

    Every one of the first three members of Alcoholics Anonymous had received Christian upbringing. Each had studied the Bible. Each believed in God. And each was cured of alcoholism by the power of God and said so.

    For example, the most powerful statement of this point by both A.A. Number One and A.A. Number Three can be found on page 191 of the Fourth Edition of Alcoholics Anonymous (2001). The statement is "the Lord has been so wonderful to me curing me of this terrible disease that I just want to keep talking about it and telling people."

    Many in Alcoholics Anonymous have never learned how the first three AAs got sober and what they said about it. Each had turned to God for help and been cured. This occurred when there were no Twelve Steps, no Twelve Traditions, basic literature like the Big Book, no drunkalogs, and no meetings as we know them today. Details can be found on <link snipped>

    The key to their studies was the material they  found in the Bible--the Book of James, Jesus' Sermon on the Mount, and 1 Corinthians 13. And those who study these segments and compare them with the A.A. Twelve Steps and Big Book can--with some guidance--easily conclude how important the Bible was in answering the initial question: Do you believe alcoholism can be cured by the power of God? It can. It was. And this real power behind Alcoholics Anonymous is available today. God Bless, Dick B.

    1. thooghun profile image86
      thooghunposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I think the more appropriate question is:

      "Do you believe alcoholism can be cured by the belief in God?".

      We draw strengths from our beliefs. Whether its in a deity, or family or a political principle. I find it belittling to claim they were an targets of a miracle, when the real miracle was their will and personal strength. I also find it belittling to suggest that they alone were worthy of divine intervention at the expense of others who struggle equally hard.

      I do not believe in God. But I do believe the belief in God can spur people to overcome hardships (the reverse is also true of course).

      1. fucsia profile image60
        fucsiaposted 6 years ago in reply to this




        I am agree! I think that the power is within us, faith is only one way to find this power

      2. I am DB Cooper profile image68
        I am DB Cooperposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I agree with this. Another effective treatment for alcoholism is hallucinogenic drugs (most of which are illegal in the United States). So if you don't feel like trippin' on God, you can always try acid.

    2. selfbetter profile image59
      selfbetterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      If you are a Christian, the answer is obvious: Yes. Otherwise, why would Jesus take our sins and infirmities? He did so, because He want's us to become clean, but not only that. He want's us to become a new person. That's why in the Bible we read about being born again. The whole point of being a Christian is following Jesus' example and becoming perfect through his Atonement (overcoming bad habits is a big part of it).

      1. profile image0
        selrachposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I am an alcoholic and have met many clergymen who are alcoholics.The favourite saying from one of them was that AA helped him where his christian believes alone could not

        1. profile image0
          kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Nicely put selrach!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          big_smile

          My answer;  lol

        2. Mike Nelson profile image60
          Mike Nelsonposted 21 months ago in reply to this

          And clergymen sin too. Does that mean god can't help them and they must seek outside help. "ye of little faith'

    3. purpleangel47 profile image60
      purpleangel47posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      First .... there is no cure for alcoholism. It's a lifetime status that you work on one day at a time to handle. Second .... I believe that prayer is powerful but ONLY when action follows. Praying to a higher power is a good way to focus and find your inner strength so that your reasons for not touching the bottle are clear. But to keep from touching that bottle every day, prayer needs some action: not driving by the liquor store; not hanging out with your old drinking partners; not frequenting places or activities with alot of alcohol. Make sense?

      1. Mike Nelson profile image60
        Mike Nelsonposted 21 months ago in reply to this

        With God all things are possible. If God can make a man God can fix a man.

    4. profile image0
      kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      also dick, that is not accurate, all three were not.

    5. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes.  The Power of God can cure anything!  With or without AA.  I've heard testimonies from credible witnesses of that, and personally witnessed the lives changed by the Power of God.
      But it's good that AA is often used as a tool for that.

      1. profile image60
        stoneyyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Except the Xian superstition.  Don't forget said alcoholism was a 'loving gift' from Jeebus.

        1 Thessalonians 5:18 (King James Version)

        18 In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you.

        Have you given thanks as instructed?

    6. ofmelancholy profile image73
      ofmelancholyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      it may be if you consider even placebo heals some people

    7. nikki1 profile image60
      nikki1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      With God all things are possible. and your families help,. It also wouldn't hurt to seeing if you can heal by rx. what booze messed up in your body. God cures all. If you believe. We are root'n for ya.

      I hope these help..

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQhZYeeR6lE

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQ1imbZUEdc

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpTeyMUE4Ow

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdpyoLOXCk8

    8. profile image0
      cosetteposted 6 years ago in reply to this



      well, you have to accept the existence of a 'higher power'...something outside of yourself to whom you acknowledge your mistakes, otherwise the serenity prayer is meaningless.

      many people who join AA don't believe in God, but it isn't the belief in God that makes them 'clean and sober'---it is the belief in themselves, which is reinforced with each visit to an AA meeting.

      i never drank, but my father did. when i turned 18, i left home and began dealing with the aftermath of having, and losing, a parent to alcoholism and part of my counseling was to attend ACA (Adult Children of Alcoholics) meetings, where i too was confronted with the 'higher power' concept...i wasn't sure if i believed in God at that point, so i just listened at these meetings and i remember in particular this one dark-haired biker-looking dude who said 'man i don't believe in no God no how...no God would have put me through this s**t' and the group leader said 'hey, god could be anyone even your dog Fred, man - just give yourself over to someone or something you believe in', so i thought about that and thought there must be SOME spiritual entity out there SOMEwhere, although not the one people think of who has a long white beard and wears flowing robes and such.

      anyway, each person, alcoholic or child of an alcoholic, does all the work. just as you are responsible for drinking, or responsible for allowing the damage done to you rule your life, you are also responsible for not drinking or for not allowing it to invade your life with negative feelings. if God really cured alcoholics and addicts, we wouldn't need organizations like AA.

    9. profile image60
      virgo girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I do... i feel like many others that if you believe in god  you can conquer all your fears and rid yourself of bad habits..
      I believed i had  issues with alcohol and although i was not a confirmed alcoholic i confirmed it myself and decided to quit that was almost 7 years ago now and i have no desire to touch a drop.
      Not drinking has made me a stronger person able to deal with anything this world has to throw at me..

    10. Beelzedad profile image60
      Beelzedadposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Strange. How does a person with a Christian upbringing become an alcoholic if they already believed in god?

      Where was their gods power then? smile

      1. luvpassion profile image59
        luvpassionposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        This question is so beyond inane the word special comes to mind. roll

        1. Beelzedad profile image60
          Beelzedadposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          If it's inane, explain why it is, then? Can you?

      2. profile image0
        SirDentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Being raised in a Christian home means nothing.  All have failed many times over.  All are tempted to do things to please their own lusts and desires.  Some resist the temptation more than others.

        EDIT:  I just realized after I wrote this that the thread was moved to the religion forum.  I will no longer post here.

        1. Beelzedad profile image60
          Beelzedadposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Really? Then what's the point of being raised Christian if it means nothing?



          Really? So, it seems then that the OP is claiming gods power had something to do with it, but you're saying it's all got to do with the individual themselves.

          Perhaps then, it is the individual who stopped drinking themselves and gods had nothing to do with it?

          smile

      3. Mike Nelson profile image60
        Mike Nelsonposted 21 months ago in reply to this

        Being fair and granting free choice and letting the consequences play out.

    11. JacquiD profile image59
      JacquiDposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Psychologically, many people choose alcohol to fill emotional voids (or sometimes to cope with disease or pain, but i'm assuming we're talking emotional).  Religion often gives people a sense of fulfillment, or the feeling that they are loved and now have a purpose in life.  I'm sure in India, alcoholics find redemption in Hinduism, and Judaism in Jerusalem, etc.  It's filling a psychological void that gives them the strength to let go of a crippling habit. 

      On the other hand, buying new shoes does the same for me.  But hey, to each his or her own, right? :-P

    12. profile image0
      kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      yes most definitely, and this is why there are no alcoholics.  Gotta love that dude.

    13. profile image0
      kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      And Dick, I would be happy to recite any page or a sentence within any page of any edition of the blue Alcoholics Anonymous party book, however,

      Maybe just start again, and take note that God is mentioned throughout this book, to which even back in the day when the agnostic groups also read from, why?

      It is crystal clear, and repeatedly clarified, even in their 12 steps that

      GOD, AS WE UNDERSTAND HIM----------------hence the notations of higher power used more often than God.  It is different for everyone. 

      Whether your are recovering alcoholic or not your and all respect for each persons anonymity is the true spiritual foundation of this AA 12 step program.

      It is a spiritual program not a religious one.

      This now baffles me, I hear you proudly quote the AA book and words, in a public forum to which most need not care, if some do, amazing, but if they do, you must be aware the one factor that stops people from getting help and causes them to fear this program is first because this word GOD scares the hell out of them. 

      If we have the disease of alcoholism, we are in agreement that by the time we are at a stage of seeking help, terrified of what it brings, GOD was not a factor in our lives for a very long time, and may never be again

      AA is based on principles not personalities.

      Respectfully, this thread serves no purpose but fun bantering for you.  If you are able to step out of yourself and your agenda to realize if this effects even one person to again turn away from help, you have with your GOD, spit on a program that millions believe in and not for god, but eventually, long into the healing process and Recovery / healing a spiritual basis of their own understanding.

      In our disease as we progress, we deteriorate, first spiritually, then mentally, finally physically, and to those suffering still, know we all recover the same opposite way, first physically then mentally , last when ready in some form, gain a greater understanding of spirituality, to your own understanding

      God as portrayed here is for selfish reasons and I hope before you go away check out www.aa.org or www.na.org , www.ca.org

      12 step programs do offer recovery and much support, please do not believe it has anything to do with any one GOD  and the scariest word in the OP statement, even thread title is CURED

      I need my Mighty Mom smile

      example; each group starts and finished with what is called the serenity prayer;

      GOD grant me the serenity
      To accept the things I cannot change
      The courage to change the things I can
      and the wisdom to know the difference

      author unknown

      Bob and Bill wrote this book only to be very clear that a0 the only requirement for membership is the DESIRE to stop drinking

      and

      Through spiritual growth is gained through a God of your understanding.  That understanding, and very powerful for many remains to be the people they sit with in the rooms of AA

      I'm out.  I'll do another Hub, maybe a how to cope when you've stopped dope kind. 

      Have a safe 24 all

      ODAAT

      No disrespect at all Dick, we all have different beliefs, which is cool, but you cannot quote a program meant for a certain group of people that live and only get by because of it's steps and try challenging it with a cure, but do respect your GOD is of your understanding.  If that makes sense at all

      off to pLAY NOW 

      smile   Kimberly

    14. Dorothee-Gy profile image81
      Dorothee-Gyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I think, everything can be cured by the power of thought, and since thought is consciousness and consciousness is connected to All-that-Is, you could call that easily God. But no matter which label you put on it, it is the direction of your thoughts that cures you, nothing else.

      1. profile image68
        paarsurreyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I don't agree with you; one should use one's will power, the medicine for rehabilitation and seeking help by praying to the Creator-God Allah YHWH who does exist and has not left the human being after giving them life. He is always there to help who seek His help sincerely ; it is one of His attributes through which we know Him.

    15. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, God can and will "cure" alcoholism.   I put "cure" in quotes because I don't believe alcoholism is a disease.  It's like any other sin, something that a person must find the desire and will to live without.
      I've not dealt with that personally, but I have it on hugely credible reference from someone in my life that the power of God took away his desire for drinking.   Once he got saved, he never touched another drop of alcohol.

      1. lyndre profile image80
        lyndreposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Are you classing drinking alcohol as a sin?

        Did jesus not turn water into wine?

        I am a recovering alcoholic.I know that I can never again drink normally or in moderation.This is why I am of the opinion that I can never be cured, but can arrest my addiction by abstaining from drinking.
        I  know a few recovering alcoholics who stopped drinking with the help of their church and their belief in god,but do not claim to be cured.

        1. profile image0
          Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          No, I'm not classifying drinking alcohol as a sin.
          The Bible classifies being a drunkard as a sin.  Difference between the two.
          And God is a merciful God who showers huge compassion upon all us sinners whose hearts reach out to Him....

      2. Jerami profile image77
        Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        If your friend, being an alcoholic, was able to quit drinking just like that (snapping fingers) it is because he got sick and tired of being sick and tired,

          He may have then prayed for help and gotten it??

          Some people never realize that they are that sick till it is too late.

          And concerning alcoholism being a sin?
          I need to ask;  is having one glass of wine with dinner a sin?

          Is another glasses after dinner a sin?
        And another ?    Or one after that one?
          When exactly does drinking wine become a sin?

          It is written that Jesus didn't have a problem making a bunch more wine when they ran out at a party he attended.

          If there were anyone that got drunk that day it would seem that he contributed to it ??

          Maybe it is kinda like going into a room is not a sin?  BUT,  not being able to find our way out of the room is sin.

           NO  that doesn't sound right.
           Maybe it is a sin?  IF all sins are equal? 
           We would then need to really think about what a sin is. 
           If stealing a piece of bread is the same level of sin  as killing or raping someone?
          I don't think that we should be throwing that word around anyway, ....  ESPECIALLY  when there is no clear agreed upon  definition of what this word means; exactly.

        1. Mike Nelson profile image60
          Mike Nelsonposted 21 months ago in reply to this

          He saved the best wine for last. Good wine in those days was called grape juice, because fresh pressed grape juice was uncommon in an age without preservatives and freezing.

  2. waynet profile image49
    waynetposted 6 years ago

    No, because I think God himself is on one big bender right now, as earthquakes and other stuff is happening whilst he is on one hell of a night out.

    1. profile image60
      stoneyyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      He's overindulged on Odin's Ale[tm] and pickled eggs and delighted in ravaging any sheep [male or female] He came across.

      When He was busted by the Justice League[tm] they found out he had open warrants for Crimes against Humanity, rapine, torture, theft, genocide, coercion, murder and more.

      God was tried and convicted and is currently serving a triple eternity sentence with no chance of parole, in solitary, in the phantom Zone[tm].

      As for 'curing' God scripted the malady, lovingly of course, on the poor individual in the first place.

      The Honeymooners;

      Ralph: Do you remember *who* took you to the hospital after you got hit with the baseball bat?

      Norton: You did, Ralph.  *After* you hit me with it!

  3. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 6 years ago

    “Do you believe alcoholism can be cured by the power of God?”

    Obviously, no disease has ever been cured by god; he is the one who created them. We have had to cure them ourselves; one by one…

  4. ahorseback profile image47
    ahorsebackposted 6 years ago

    "One addiction for another" it is how some handle it......

  5. 4elements profile image79
    4elementsposted 6 years ago

    I believe the person is the one who has to find the way to cure it as you say. But I also think that They are never really cured , because they introduce themselves as I am a recovering so and so. They also say that it is a battle for the rest of your life. You are always battling with not falling off the wagon or whatever word you want to use. Again my opinion, and my answer is no. Faith helps but it is steal up to the person to succeed or fail.

  6. Disturbia profile image62
    Disturbiaposted 6 years ago

    My husband is an alcoholic and there is no such thing as a "CURE" for alcoholism.  The alcoholic is always in recovery, but never cured. There is, however, the desire to make positive changes and live one's life alcohol free.  If faith in one's spiritual deity facilitates that process and gives the strenght to say clean and sober, so be it.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You are correct of course, alcoholism is a disease with a known cause. Giving it up forever is the usual way to treat it, as there is no known cure.

    2. JacquiD profile image59
      JacquiDposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      It depends why you are an alcoholic.  By definition, it's excessive intake of alcohol, cravings and withdrawal symptoms upon stopping.  Naturally, anything you put a lot of in and take away from your body will cause withdrawal (just try and stop eating processed sugar, i dare you! lol)

      For example, I had alcoholics in my family, turns out we had Celiac's Disease, and just didn't know what it was.  This was coping mechanism, and once the problem was fixed the cravings for over-consumption of alcohol stopped, and the withdrawal over time stopped as well. 

      On the other hand!  If you are an alcoholic because you have an addictive personality, then you probably are in recovery forever because those cravings never really stop, similar to smoking. 

      Just a thought :-)

  7. Uzdawi profile image36
    Uzdawiposted 6 years ago

    I´m not religolous person, so I will say that, alchoholism can be cured by the power of mind and rehabilitation, rather than any other power.

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Alcoholism CAN NOT BE CURED!
      It's a damned disease that changes your brain, your personality. You can fight it, suppress it, but as soon as you give a slack to yourself, or have problems, it will come with a vengeance big time!  My husband was an alcoholic and then he had a dibilitating stroke... my deepest sympathies with Disturbia, I know what she is dealing with every day.

      1. profile image60
        stoneyyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Don't know about a cure, per se.  I've been classified as being in remission for many years.

        It might be that I'm an oddball.  I now can have an occasional beer or two and leave it at that.  I used the same techniques to kill cigarettes previously.

        For me, the cigs was a lot harder to kick.  I don't miss the dang things.

  8. Jaggedfrost profile image84
    Jaggedfrostposted 6 years ago

    I agree with some that an addict while they are an addict can never be cured but must an addict always be an addict?  Are people so written in stone that nothing can change a man's wants and disposition?  Are we locked into our thoughts and actions such that there is no hope to grow out of whatever roots we started in.  It is true that if one is left in a pattern long enough that the chances for deviation drop by the year but statistically the abortion in each year is still calculable.  Can God help make such a change as to make a man who once desired to escape this world or a woman equally bent to change their nature?  If anyone can it would have to be God but as God can't answer nor steal a man's will to fight him it must be observed that the choice to live and change must rest with the afflicted and any change must be permanent.  If this be the case then the cure must be enduring and until the end.  It is probably then understandable that if one is to escape one's self then one must become a man of God that replaces the previous place of vice with something a little more substantial and is there in stayed.

    1. profile image60
      stoneyyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Keep in mind that, according to Christianity, 'God' gave the addiction in the first place.  Many addicts simply change drugs and 'mainline' Jesus.  Again, such was part of the 'divine plan.'

      Personal changes can be made-to varying degrees-by the individual.  Darned difficult, but it can be done.

  9. profile image0
    CHEMISTRYOFLIFEposted 6 years ago

    acoholism can't be cured by God .it can only be cured by one's own will power .

  10. Teresa McGurk profile image61
    Teresa McGurkposted 6 years ago

    The original poster raises an interesting point, though. Bill Wilson was on the verge, the edge, of absolute despair in alcoholism, when he somehow found a strength he didn't know he had, and that he felt could not have come from him alone, but which he believed came from a higher power. 

    You don't have to get hung up on the God stuff in AA if you don't want to (unless you are unfortunately attending meetings peopled only by AA-nazi Godmongers, and they exist I guess).

    And no, there is no cure for alcoholism. But some people, a lucky few, seem to find strength that they need when they admit that they can't manage their drinking habits alone.  I wonder what causes this paradoxical little mini-miracle.  Bill Wilson and many others have called it God, probably because he/they didn't know what else to call it. But suddenly, just when the alcoholic is at rock bottom, to be warmed with what some have called a state of grace (Ultimate love, forgiveness, and compassion)--and to find strength--sure must have felt like religion.

    1. profile image60
      stoneyyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I've found people underestimate themselves greatly.  Such includes me as well.  That was a very surprising thing to learn.

  11. brianzen profile image60
    brianzenposted 6 years ago

    Alcoholism is cured by a more balanced less stressful life. Drinking as a solution to problems and problem drinking are both forms of depression. Cheering up may be the thing, even if it means divorce and starting over. I have never met a truly happy person who couldn't put the bottle down.

  12. Beth100 profile image84
    Beth100posted 6 years ago

    Kimberly is correct in her statement.

    Addiction is a disease.  It has been proven, scientifically, that is stems from a gene.  This gene is turned "off" when one is born, but can be turned "on" as we grow.  It can be turned on from an andreline rush (such as high speed driving), alcohol, drugs, sex, etc.  Once turned "on", it stays "on".  It cannot be cured; there is no antidote for this disease.

    The twelve steps, at least where I am from, does not refer to any specific God but rather a Higher Power, which allows any person seeking help to turn to AA without the worry that they are being disloyal to their own beliefs.

    A belief, in itself, holds enough power to help a person out of any situation. However, belief is not enough.  A person must believe and find the courage to trust his own beliefs and action out his beliefs.  It is finding the courage that becomes the key to successfully control the addiction.  The daily reminder is just that.  A reminder that you have a belief in yourself to find, and sustain, the courage to take another step forward.

    A Higher Power is an important figure in the process of recovery, but is only one chapter of an entire book.

  13. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    Abstinence is the only known "cure" smile

  14. profile image0
    hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago

    Sikhs don't drink at all...  do they have need of a Christiuan God to cure Alcoholism?  Devout Muslims also do not drink.  Is then Alcoholism a disease of Christians?  Or a disease at all?  I do not doubt that the Christian foundation of the 12 step program has power for those that believe in the tenets found therein.  But they mistake this belief in an OUTSIDE power for giving them the strength to resist their TEMPTATION when all along the power lies within that individual.  I do believe in a DIVINE principle but also believe that no one religion has a monopoly on DIVINITY.  I knew a man who didn't believe in God but surrendered to a Higher Power which happened to be a pair of tube socks.  He beat his addiction by surrendering to this higher power.  Are we now to bow down and pray tpo a pair of tube socks because one man found something outside himself that unlocked the DIVINE STRENGTH that was inside him from the beginning?

  15. aguasilver profile image85
    aguasilverposted 6 years ago

    Yes, seen it,lived it and delivered it to folk, Christ can raise the dead, alcohol is not a problem for Him.

    1. profile image60
      stoneyyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Superman's got him beat.  Superman can jump tall buildings in a single bound and is faster than a locomotive.  {Boy was Lois Lane mad about that one}

      Yeah, there's all these recorded historical incidents of grave yards full of corpses strolling down the street.  [rolls eyes]

  16. Disturbia profile image62
    Disturbiaposted 6 years ago

    Alcoholism has no respect gender, race, social, financial, or religious boundries... it is an equal opportunaty addiction.

  17. chrysstil profile image60
    chrysstilposted 6 years ago

    Although I do not have the same perception on this issue, my position is as follows.
    God and faith in general is very important to  the people who believe in Him.
    If the person is reinforced by faith in God then this will help.
    But it is important the person to believe in himself and understand that certainly deserve a better life.

  18. Dr Ken Romeo profile image60
    Dr Ken Romeoposted 6 years ago

    This is going to sound phony but...for the majority of us, "Seeing is believing." For the alcoholic, "Believing is Seeing."

  19. lornadarden profile image43
    lornadardenposted 6 years ago

    I think that any addiction is curable from within, if you really want it and try hard enough than God will help you achieve it.

  20. ahorseback profile image47
    ahorsebackposted 6 years ago

    Every minite, every hour, all things are curable....

  21. mythbuster profile image84
    mythbusterposted 6 years ago

    Nope.

  22. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    1. Alcoholism is a disease that cannot be cured, period. Once you have it, you always have it.But...
    2. It is possible to overcome the obsession of the mind and the physical craving for alcohol and live in recovery.
    3. The relationship to "God" espoused in AA is not religion. It is spirituality. There's a difference. Spirituality is about creating/strengthening your relationship with a higher power DIRECTLY. You can choose to be religious also, but it's not necessary to recovery.
    4. The word "God" is used in the 12 Steps. The key phrase, however is "God as we understand him." This means that every alcoholic gets to pick their OWN GOD! (How cool is that!). There are many atheists in AA. They select a Higher Power that they choose not to call God. Some use the fellowship of the group. Some use the acronym GOD to mean "Good Orderly Direction" or even "Group of Drunks."

    If you read the stories in the back of the Big Book you will notice that alcoholics come from all different backgrounds. Quite a few Christians, including sons/daughters of preachers and ministers. American Indians, Jews, Irish, Japanese, Blacks, whites, women, men.
    As stated previously here, alcoholism doesn't discriminate. It's an equal opportunity malady.

    I also agree with those who've stated that recover requires both faith and action. "Faith without works is dead." Pretty cut and dried, really.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      MM, I agree with all of your thoughts on the matter of alcoholism.

      A lot of ongoing strength is needed to stay away from alcohol completely for the rest of their life. What motivates that strength is a personal thing, but certainly involves acquiring an inordinate amount of inner power.

  23. Shopping-Online profile image72
    Shopping-Onlineposted 6 years ago

    The Power of prayer is great, especially when done in a group. However, there are several natural home remedies for treating alcohol addiction as well.

  24. adeyera profile image59
    adeyeraposted 6 years ago

    With God all things are possible. There is a spirit behind alcoholism and for one to stop taking alcohol you need a supernatural power of God. I am talking from experience,If you want to stop drinking alcohol you ask God for help. Draw near unto him through prayer.Peace

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I guess there were no supernatural powers for my poor husband... There was no spirit behind his alcoholism , but a lot of it in his bottle.

  25. Disturbia profile image62
    Disturbiaposted 6 years ago

    The only supernatural power my husband needed to quit drinking was for his doctor to look him point blank in the face and tell him either he quit or his liver would quit for him.

  26. maheshpatwal profile image83
    maheshpatwalposted 6 years ago

    We all have different meaning of  GODs..... To me it is something which has the super power to do anything.By keeping the hope and faith on almighty we can fight any diseases or get rid of any bad habit.

    1. nikki1 profile image60
      nikki1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      There is only one "God". he created everything. Us,.

  27. Polly C profile image87
    Polly Cposted 6 years ago

    No, I think addiction can only be cured by a person's own strength and perception of life - I'm not sure it can come from any outside source.

    1. nikki1 profile image60
      nikki1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Consider praying to God. Giving him all your sadness etc. God never wants you to suffer.

      1. Joseph Lewis profile image61
        Joseph Lewisposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        God is always there for you he is always listening and knows our hearts. Remember you are never alone. "Ask and it shall be given." When you pray go in to your room close the door and pray to your father who is unseen. He will already know what you need before you ask him. Remember we walk with faith and not by sight. I will pray for all of you.

  28. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    No fairies don't help with alcoholism any more than it does with any other disease.

    It's a bloody disease fer gords sake!!! read something!!!!!!!!!!!!

  29. profile image0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    No.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You're excused an exempted ralwus! You already know stuff! smile

      1. profile image0
        ralwusposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        big_smile big_smile big_smile that's too funny

  30. waynet profile image49
    waynetposted 6 years ago

    Yes, and the tooth fairy doesn't want to cure tooth ache and Santa Clause is an alcoholic and Jesus was a man in a robe who didn't exist! (Except as an image in a pie or some other food stuff!

  31. Joe Badtoe profile image62
    Joe Badtoeposted 6 years ago

    erm Hello

    Who was it that turned water into wine?

    That's where it all started.

  32. profile image0
    SirDentposted 6 years ago

    God is able to deliver whomever He wants from alcohol addiction.  I know many who used to be alcoholics but are no longer bound by alcohol.  I also know may who were drug addicts but have been delivered from the addiction of drugs. 

    I know many won't believe it, but it is true.  Though I was never an alcoholic, I did use to use drugs a lot.  There is absolutely no desire in me to use drugs anymore. 

    http://www.testimonyshare.com/deliveran … in-damage/

    I suggest you read a few testimonies. It might actually enlighten you.

    1. Joe Badtoe profile image62
      Joe Badtoeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I suggest you step down from  your pious high chair and accept that whilst you're convinced of who or what cured you others like me might choose to take a more pragmatic  view of addiction. You found the light and you're free from your addiction and for that I'm both pleased and proud for you but making such an open ended statement that 'God is able to deliver whomever he wants from alcohol addiction' is something that Im sure myself and others would find hard to accept. based on your testimony alone.

      1. aguasilver profile image85
        aguasilverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Christ healed the sick, gave sight to the blind and raised the dead, and I have found that He is more than capable of curing alcoholism, indeed I find it impossible to think that He cannot.

        But, and it's a big but, it requires total faith and trust in God and Christ, and most folk who are alcoholics find THAT just too difficult when they are living the lie.

        Before I came to faith, I was a heavy drinker and dope smoker, and that was at least a bottle of vodka a day, beers and a large spliff every 45 minutes or so.... so I admit I did have a problem, and frankly I had no real intent of getting rid of it, as I had enough cash to support my 'habits' - once I came to faith, I went totally clean for three years, before I realised that the reason for my habits had disappeared, I no longer hated life and had stopped wanting to kill myself by default.

        Now 18 years later, I can take a drink, without needing to take a third, and although I no longer smoke dope, it's by choice not obligation.

        I don't want to start an argument, but God CAN cure alcoholism IF the alcoholic actually can allow it to happen.

        He removes the reason for the habit, and fills you with inner peace.

        The problem with quasi religious organisations like AA is that they seek a 'higher power', without having the gana´s to seek the HIGHEST POWER.

        1. Mark Knowles profile image59
          Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Astounding. I quit smoking cigarettes last year and have been free for a year now. I also cut down my drinking to sensible levels and no longer drink to excess. I also went on a diet and have now lost 29 pounds. I am getting regular exercise and feel very, very good.

          God did not have anything to do with it. I did it myself. I decided. I did it. And any one can if they choose to.

          Your ridiculous assertions merely serves to show how desperate you are. That is the problem with religionists like you - you are more concerned with validating your nonsensical belief system than actually helping people. No morals. None. sad

          1. aguasilver profile image85
            aguasilverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I'm pleased for you Mark, tell me again in another 17 years or so and I'll really believe that your willpower alone (which seems to be stronger than everyone else's, which may be true)has 'saved' you.

            As for the rest of your diatribe, just another bitter twisted dig, which I am now fully used to receiving, indeed, the day you stop I would worry about having become lukewarm!

            Have a nice day smile

            1. Mark Knowles profile image59
              Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Just hate to see you spouting that nonsense instead of actually helping some one. No one is ever "cured" of an addiction. They just learn to manage it - and decide to do it or not. Spreading your misinformation that god picks and chooses who he cures of addictions is merely serving to validate your beliefs and not helping anyone.

              My father quit smoking and drinking 20 years ago and does not believe the rubbish you do - so will power seems to work for him. He didn't turn into a condescending, self-righteous religionist in the process either. wink

              1. aguasilver profile image85
                aguasilverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                "Spreading your misinformation that god picks and chooses who he cures of addictions is merely serving to validate your beliefs and not helping anyone."

                God does not pick and choose, we ask, in faith, with trust in God, God can act on that request.

                I have no need to validate my beliefs, frankly it's of no consequence to me whether anyone believes or not, that is their choice.

                I do care that humanists spout venom and hatred in their attempts to diminish Gods word and silence His people and their testimony.

                Testimony; that's the direct evidence presented in court, and accepted as proof of innocence or guilt.

                Normally they ask you to swear on the Holy Bible.

                1. Cagsil profile image60
                  Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  And, people LIE too, even though they do that. So, again you have no valid point. Good going.

      2. profile image0
        SirDentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        The fact is this.  No matter what you accept or believe makes absolutely no difference.

        You say I should step off my "high chair" but it is you who needs to step off the high chair.

        God is God.  You are not God as you try to make others believe.  You are not the only one who makes this claim so I will say this.  None of you who claim to be God, are God.

  33. profile image0
    cosetteposted 6 years ago

    what's a 'spliff'?

    i had no idea you overcame all of that. congratulations. i wish my father had had your strength of will and commitment. maybe he wouldn't have been driving drunk that night...

    1. Mark Knowles profile image59
      Mark Knowlesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      A spliff is a joint. big_smile

  34. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 6 years ago

    Unbelievable the responses in this thread. The "thinking" is so skewed, no wonder the world is F**ked up as it is now. WOW!

    1. Joe Badtoe profile image62
      Joe Badtoeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Depends whose thinking you think is skewed surely?

      Which responses do you find unbelievable?

      1. Cagsil profile image60
        Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Mind your business. I can voice a response, which does not require a further response. If you don't have a clue as to what I am talking about, then apparently your view is skewed. I would think that was obvious. But, in your case, I guess not.

        1. Joe Badtoe profile image62
          Joe Badtoeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          you're a bit weird

          1. Cagsil profile image60
            Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Thank you. wink

  35. profile image0
    ralwusposted 6 years ago

    it's easy to quit drinking, smoking, sex, dope . . .i did it a thousand times already, probably more

  36. Disturbia profile image62
    Disturbiaposted 6 years ago

    If god actually "cured" anything, wouldn't that be a direct intervention and interference with the free will he has given us?  Then why not "cure" everyone of every ill?  Why not stop the bad behavior before it's started?

    We make the choice to drink, smoke, and abuse ourselves and it is up to us to make the choice to stop.  If it helps some people to pray, then let them pray... if others don't need prayer, they don't have to use it.

    Seems like the point is to stop the behavior, so do whatever works best for yourself. Everybody has the right to their own opinion and to use whatever method works best for themselves.

    1. aguasilver profile image85
      aguasilverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "If god actually "cured" anything, wouldn't that be a direct intervention and interference with the free will he has given us?"

      It's hardly direct intervention if you ASK Him to cure you.

      "Then why not "cure" everyone of every ill?"

      Like I said, it's trust in God, faith that He can and will cure you, and you need to ASK, in faith, with trust. 

      "Why not stop the bad behavior before it's started?"

      That would be direct intervention, against your free will.

      We can choose to live with or without God.

      1. Cagsil profile image60
        Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol lol lol

      2. Disturbia profile image62
        Disturbiaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, we can choose to live with or without god in our lives.

        1. aguasilver profile image85
          aguasilverposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Precisely smile

          Actually for most folk that should read:

          "Yes, we can choose to live with or without a (as in any) god in our lives."

          1. Castlepaloma profile image23
            Castlepalomaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Too Too bad it not work in the city of Sheboygan WI. per capita they have more churches and bars than any where USA  The USA being more like Sodom and Gomorrah  than anywhere too.

            How will bars wash their sins away.

  37. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    The Bible has no bearing whatsoever on Alcoholics Anonymous. AA is not a religious program -- as defined by a group of people all believing in/worshipping the same God.
    AA is a SPIRITUAL program. The suffering alcoholic is provided guidance on how to reconnect with a Higher Power. The connection with the HP is direct, not through an intermediary (priest, shaman, AA leader, etc.)
    Each alcoholic gets to choose and define their OWN Higher Power. If you want to call yours "God" that's aok. If you want your Higher Power to be nature, the ocean, a doorknob, or anything else, that's aok too.
    If you have ever suffered from an inability to stop drinking and stay stopped (meaning that you have tried and failed to be able to use willpower to overcome your cravings), it is obvious you need a power greater than yourself (i.e., your own willpower) to eliminate that craving.

    As to the founders of AA having been raised Christian -- there are many alcoholics who were raised Christian. There are many who were raised in other faiths, and many who were raised without any faith and many who are atheists. How you were raised is irrelevant. It's an equal-opportunity disease.
    MOST people who come into recovery decide to redefine their Higher Power/God from the one they were raised with anyway.

    1. profile image0
      kimberlyslyricsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      oh sure I needed you 20 minutes ago lol 

      and can't find my blue bible to boot!

      I think I was typing so slow when I said I needed you, the God of my understanding, had you be here by the time I hit post

      I thank you HOT Mom

      xo

  38. profile image68
    paarsurreyposted 6 years ago

    Alcohlism can be cured by medicine, will of the person combined with prayer to the Creator-God Allah YHWH.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Show me the medical cure for alcoholism or retract your statement.

      1. earnestshub profile image88
        earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I didn't think I would get a reply. lol

        1. earnestshub profile image88
          earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Where's the medical cure?

          1. lyndre profile image80
            lyndreposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            If there was a miracle pill I would be first in the queue lol.

            I have had medication to help with cravings,and I take antabuse to help as a dterrant,which I have written a hub about.

            Alas I am still waiting along with millions of others for the miracle pill.

            Alcoholism can never be cured but can be arrested.

            1. earnestshub profile image88
              earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              The same sort of thing goes on with people judging others who have mental illness. smile

  39. Miramarusa profile image60
    Miramarusaposted 6 years ago

    No, we cannot left it on god, it would be cured by your willing to leave it.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      USA 78% Christian

      dickd I see you live there, and your interest is with Alcoholics Anonymous Christian Fellowship. there are many case where people get too high on alcoholic then turn to Jesus and then get too high on him. It’s difficult to say if the alcoholic has a lifelong addictive personally in the first place.

      I did a job in a city called Sheboygan WI. where they had per capita more churches and bars than any where in Sodom and Gomorrah USA. I guess the bars were a place to wash their sins.

      I think everyone is God and Lesson in love, might work.

  40. Jerami profile image77
    Jeramiposted 6 years ago

    Alcoholism is not a disease that you catch like the common cold or the flue,  or chickenpox.

       It is a condition that has been established through a certain behavior.  Can an alcoholic change their behavior?
    Like any other behavior!  Only if they want to.

       Can the physical damage inflicted upon the body be reversed.  That depends upon the extent of damage.
       I have heard it said that we can make a pickle from a cucumber.  but we can not make a cucumber from a pickle.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing.
      The behavior you speak of may be as innocent as having the first single glass of wine.

      Alcoholism is a disease that can be triggered by one drink. No blame needs to be assigned to it.
      As Lyndre points out, alcoholism cannot be cured, no one is to blame for their behavior.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image23
        Castlepalomaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        true

      2. profile image0
        Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I want to add that if you can stop drinking by your will, it means that you are not an alcoholic, NOT YET. Alcoholic does not have a will to do that. And yes, to start all over - one glass of wine is enough. Or just start it all.
        Social habit - personal habit -  indulgence - disease - addiction - beginning of the end for many.

      3. Jerami profile image77
        Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        When I posted that answer my mind was focused upon the aspects of sclerosis of the liver or kidney failure.
          These are self imposed injuries due to an addiction.
        I guess from the mental aspects, this can be considered as a disease. Before I argue for my perception, I'd look up the definition in the dictionary
          I am just curious as to what point does an injury cross the line into being classified as a disease.?

  41. couturepopcafe profile image61
    couturepopcafeposted 6 years ago

    Actually, faith and enough belief in anything can bring about change if a person wants to change.  The key is the power and strength of the belief.  It's not enough to intellectually believe something, you have to feel it in your gut.  Who feels it knows it.  You'll be amazed at the transformation the power of right thought can bring.

  42. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Jerami,
    I don't think you are going to get true information about alcoholism from a dictionary. There is still way too much misinformation in not only the general public but the medical community about this DISEASE.

    Allow me to take your points one by one if I may:
    1. "Sclerosis of the liver or kidney failure are self-imposed injuries due to an addiction.
    Answer: True. These are physical consequence of alcoholism. They do not happen to every alcoholic, but if you drink too much over too long of a time, you could very well end up with both. Or a host of other physical ailments including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, lung disease (many alcoholics also smoke) and something really lovely called "wet brain."
    Are they "self-imposed?" Yes and no.
    They are the result of an overwhelming COMPULSION to drink which becomes beyond the alcoholic's control. While in the beginning drinking was "self-imposed" in middle and late stage alcoholism is is dictated by a wacked out brain.
    2. From the mental aspects this can be considered a disease.
    Alcoholism is a disease of the mind (mental) body (physical) and spirit (emotions).
    It is the result of a peculiar combination of an obsession of the mind and an allergy of the body. Yes, alcoholics actually process alcohol differently than "normal" people.
    3. At what point does an injury cross the line into being classified as a disease?
    I personally believe that you are born with the alcoholic "gene" so you basically are diseased from birth. However, it takes awhile for the disease to manifest.
    Alcholics can continue drinking for years before alcohol kicks their butts.
    The "point of no return" is, as stated below, when the alcoholic realizes that he or she is unable to control his/her drinking. If s/he tries to stop s/he may be able to stop for a period of time (or may not be). That realization that you can't stop is when you categorically KNOW you are an alcoholic.

    Hope this helps clear some things up. MM

    1. Jerami profile image77
      Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you  You did clarify a couple of points that I couldn't find the words for.

          I raised a child that became addicted to alcohol in his teens and into mid life.  He has been sober now for about 15 years.

         And I lost a wife to sorosis of the liver and kidney failure, so I have seen it up close and personal.
         From these situations there seemed to have been underlying issues that drinking appeared to ease the pain and yet magnified them.  I would go as far as to say that in these cases, unresolved issues was an invisible influence to be reckoned with.
        I don't think that there is a point of no return,  But it often seems that the return ticket just isn't worth the price to that individual.

      This is a hard situation for everyone involved.
      To know the proper way to behave.  This is best seen in hindsight.   And sometimes even then is futile.

        And yes your reply helped.

  43. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Oh gosh, Jerami. I am so sorry for the loss of your wife and for the child you had to watch go through addiction. Happy to hear he made it through to sobriety.
    May I inquire if this child is the son of your wife?
    Alcoholism does run in families.

    Alcoholism/addiction (basically the same disease -- choice of "numbing agent/coping mechanism" doesn't really matter) is such a baffling thing to observe. Heartbreaking, really.

    You are absolutely right about the underlying issues that must be reckoned with. The willingness to do just that is really what makes the difference between people who are able to get/stay sober and those who can't.
    To get to willingness, the alcoholic/addict has to reach a point of recognition that the alcohol/drug/behavior is no longer "working." The magnification of the pain becomes greater than the ease of the pain.
    You reach a point of "stuck" between living/death, rock and a hard place. You know you can't continue drinking (because it no longer has the desired effect and often because your doctor is telling you you are going to die) but you can't imagine life without alcohol, either.

    I really am sorry that your wife succombed to organ failure. I hope you have gotten some support for yourself.

    Glad you are talking about it here. Best, MM

  44. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    I disagree with the whole "development" argument.
    1. You are born an alcoholic.
    2. There is no cure.
    3. How do you apportion blame when an innocent first glass of wine can trigger full blown chemical addiction in the brain?
    4.Total and complete abstinence is the only way to avoid the consequences and misinformation is all the average alcoholic ever hears, and people spread ill informed crud about "cures."

    I got cancer, that is a disease, I did not contribute to it in any way according to the 5 specialist that treated me, so why should alcoholism require blaming the patient?
    I don't know a single person who has not been affected in some way by this dreaded disease either by having a family member, a friend or even knowing someone injured or killed by a drunk driver who is an alcoholic.
    Despite this, alcohol is a social drug that is accepted world-wide.
    It makes heroin look like a nice drug!
    I can tell you why it is so excepted.... ignorance and taxes.
    If marijuana could be controlled and taxed it would be legal by tomorrow, but it cant. It grows like a weed everywhere.

  45. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    BTW, my mom was also one who didn't seem to think the return ticket was worth it. God rest her soul.
    Me -- I hold the memory of incomprehensible demoralization close. If I'm ever, ever tempted to take that "first drink" I know where it would lead me. I've gained way too much in sobriety to willingly go back to hell. Not worth losing everything!
    My son -- started early, blazed quickly, and is now, at 18, on the upswing into a healthier life. Not 100% sober, but I believe (hope) the worst is behind him.

  46. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Earnest,
    Who are you disagreeing with?
    I agree with you 100%.
    However, there are centuries of "blame" for the "weak-willed" alkie on the books. I've seen that attitude here in the forums from people I would have expected to know better (considering they work in the field!).
    Maybe if we continue to correct the untruths one post at a time we can make a difference. I know that's one of my missions!
    MM

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I am still in disagreement with Jeremy on this thread.
      How do you "self impose" the associated illness. That still says the same thing as his original post which blamed the alcoholic directly. The blame remained, it just got shifted to "underlying issues"
      "These are self imposed injuries due to an addiction."

      Disingenuous.

      1. Jerami profile image77
        Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I agree and disagree with the opinions so far expressed in this thread.   
          People forget that alcohol is poison. Recognized and registered as such. Poison affects diffrent people differently.
          If some people have less resistance (due to genetics) to a poison than others; does this mean that they have a disease?


          I am sympathetic .. I truly am.   I've drank my share  and still sometimes drink more beer than I should.   I am not judging anyone or anything except the wisdom of clasifying this as a disease?
          Just my opinion
        And admitt to being wrong quite often..

        1. earnestshub profile image88
          earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Jeremi it is a disease plain and simple.

          1. Jerami profile image77
            Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            You are absolutely correct

            Definition I found for disease.  ..."In this broader sense, it sometimes includes injuries, disabilities, disorders, syndromes, infections".

              So yes it is certainly classified as a disease.

            1. earnestshub profile image88
              earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              It's in the genes and affects the mind of the sufferer often with the first drink. smile

              1. Jerami profile image77
                Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I think that we are using different words to say the same thing.

                   I think this thread was asking if it can be cured.

      2. Jerami profile image77
        Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I was casting no blame on a person for being born with a propensity for an addiction.
        No more than it is a person fault that is allergic to bee stings when they are stung by a bee.

          This I believe also falls into the category of disease
          Placing blame  not at all.

  47. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Oh, I think I see your point of disagreement on the word "development."
    Alcoholism is a progressive, fatal disease.
    It does get worse over time.
    There are distinct stages which any alcoholic in recovery can identify (in hindsight).
    One of the best books I've ever read on the biological progression of alcoholism is Under The Influence.
    Anyone who reads this book and still claims it's not a disease is in serious denial.

    http://www.amazon.com/Under-Influence-G … 0553274872

  48. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Alcoholics react differently to alcohol than other people.
    Yes, it's poison, but alcoholics CRAVE that poison.
    To an alcoholic, that alcohol is his/her medicine.
    He she is well when drunk and sick when not drinking.
    Some alcoholics get to the point of not being able to eat -- living on the sugar of alcohol.
    To poison one's own body in that way, to continue ingesting alcohol despite the negative consequences that occur in your life and the physical consequences like liver disease -- is completely unnatural.
    But alcoholics do that because their obsessive brain tells them to do it. They become completely obsessed with drinking.

    As to the wisdom of classifying it as a disease. It has been classified as a disease since the 1939 when the book Alcoholics Anonymous was written by Bill W. and Dr. Bob.

  49. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Nope. I think we've established that alcoholism cannot be cured.

    I would take Earnest's last comment one step further.

    It is in the genes and affects the mind of the sufferer often well BEFORE the first drink.
    I've heard many, many alcoholics describe how they felt as children (different, not like others, alien, uncomfortable in their own skin, restless, irritable and discontent) and how they felt as soon as they put alcohol in their bodies.

    The mental difference of the alcoholic is already well in place before that first drink. The mental obsession with alcohol starts taking hold from the first drunk. Alcoholics ALWAYS remember their first drink -- even if it was 30 years ago.
    I don't think normal people can say that.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      WOW MM!
      Thanks for the information I learn from you all the time!
      That is most informative.

    2. Jerami profile image77
      Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I really can see where this could be true. I have only heard anyone mention remembering their first drink from one person.I didn't know that this was a common thing for alcoholics.

         My Wife who passed mentioned remembering her first drink as a young child. Seemed as though she remembered it vividly.

  50. Mighty Mom profile image89
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Oh yes. I have never met an alcoholic who DIDN'T have vivid memories associated with alcohol. The first tastes of alcohol (as a child) as well as the first time getting drunk (that sense of "ease and comfort" that comes over you, finally feeling like you DO fit in, then followed by usually passing out/throwing up (or throwing up first, then passing out).
    And what else is pretty universal to alcoholics is that after that inauspicious beginning, to a man/woman, EVERYONE says, "And I couldn't wait to do it again!"

    Another thing that distinguishes alcoholics from other drinkers is blackouts. Normal drinkers, even heavy drinkers, don't lose hours or even days when they don't remember who they were with, what they said or what they did. Often these blackouts involve travel -- even on AIRPLANES.

    Yes, it is a very, very bizarre disease indeed.

 
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