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jump to last post 1-18 of 18 discussions (64 posts)

Why do people write personal fan mail notes, but yet haven't commented on an art

  1. pagesvoice profile image84
    pagesvoiceposted 5 years ago

    Why do people write personal fan mail notes, but yet haven't commented on an article?

    Am I the only one who sits in utter amazement at people who send personal fan mail notes telling you how wonderful, inspiring, creative and informative your writing is, only to find out they have NEVER even written a reply to ANY of your articles? If their goal is to lure me into following them then they are sorely mistaken. Don't tell me what a great writer I am unless you take the time and vote along with leaving a comment on my article. Do you think I am being too harsh?

  2. JayeWisdom profile image92
    JayeWisdomposted 5 years ago

    No, I don't think you're harsh or expecting too much from anyone who sends you fan mail. Anyone who enjoys your work should respond to it in the Comments section of your hubs. This is how we support other HP writers. Personally, when I read a hub I like or that "speaks to me" for any reason, I almost feel compelled to let the writer know I enjoyed it and, often, why. That's real fan mail.

    Jaye

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is very much the way I feel about it, Jaye. The interaction between Hubbers is the single greatest  value of Hubpages for aspiring writers, IMHO.  It provides the sounding board we need as relatively amateur writers.

    2. Seeker7 profile image95
      Seeker7posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. Even if it must means writing just one sentence to show your support I think it helps the writer and the HP community as a whole to be supportive in this way.

  3. billybuc profile image87
    billybucposted 5 years ago

    I don't know the answer to your question but I have experienced the same thing myself. I am in the process of eliminating some followers.  It is no longer worth my time to give support when none is given in return.

    1. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Oh oh...I had better read a couple more of your hubs and comment. LOL

    2. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It's not just 'tit for tat' on the following scene, but when a real disinterest is demonstrated by someone listing himself as a follower but never acknowledging the person supposedly followed, it's obvious that there's no genuine interest.

  4. ChristinS profile image95
    ChristinSposted 5 years ago

    or maybe they just don't have time to comment on every article they read? I read the work of a lot of people and don't always comment, it doesn't mean I don't appreciate the person or find them inspiring.  I understand where you're coming from to an extent, but perhaps you are being a bit harsh?  I think if people are paying you a compliment you should take that at face value and not suspect an ulterior motive.  Just my opinion.  smile

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Cristin, you shine through as a thoughtful, polite person & of course one wouldn't reject another's effort to be kind, however it's done even when it screams out that it's motivated by no more than self-service.  One just accepts it & moves o

    2. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      As I've mentioned in other comments here, my only intent in asking this question was to get a sense for how others feel about this. I'm seeing all sides to the debate and to me, they are all answers that make sense.

  5. Patriot Quest profile image60
    Patriot Questposted 5 years ago

    Page I would guess that a lot of people are intimidated by writing comments, they may feel unsure of themselves in putting it out there so to speak.  You and I write emotional political hubs that stir people up and maybe they simply read to enjoy but choose to stay out of the heat of battle? LOL, .........great question

    1. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good point.

    2. MarleneB profile image98
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Patriot Quest - this is so on the money. With the "bound to be heated" hubs, I save myself the turmoil that comes with speaking up.

    3. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There's no question that the type of hubs one writes stir different  responses in readers.    I do choose to stay out of the heat of battlegrounds, but I still want to appreciate the writers' efforts, which doesn't require getting into the fray.

  6. MarleneB profile image98
    MarleneBposted 5 years ago

    Well, after a year of being here on HubPages, I can remember at least three times when I read a hub, voted on it, but did not leave a comment. Sometimes, I just don't have anything compelling to say. Sometimes, I just don't feel like commenting. When I go to my statistics page, I see thousands of people who have read but not commented. Whether or not I comment, I always vote. For me, voting is not an option. Even if I don't leave a comment, I at least vote.

    I don't always follow people just because I read a hub and liked it. And, I don't always follow people just because they follow me. I might follow someone after reading several hubs, one of which I may or may not have left a comment. I don't go back and check all of the hubs I have read. I just follow and leave fan mail as it suits my feelings at the time.

    Not everyone is going to do things the way I like them to be done. There are going to be people who read my hub and leave. They don't feel compelled to comment. Maybe they feel like they don't have anything significant to share. Maybe they liked what they read so much that instead of commenting they took the time to go to my profile page, click on the follow button, and leave a meaningful message. That's priceless.

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Marlene, ,an excellent habit.  If you've read & have a valid vote to cast it's valuable..  A personal comment, as well, even if it's only "Thumb up!" would be enjoyed by the writer.  Most hubbers write as persons, not as established professionals

    2. profile image0
      Vickiwposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you Marlene and Nellieanna. I think we just have to enjoy everyone who does comment, and realize not everyone is going to show their enjoyment the same way.

  7. hawaiianodysseus profile image80
    hawaiianodysseusposted 5 years ago

    Good afternoon, Dennis!

    Great question! After a year and a day of being a member of HubPages, it's been my experience to encounter two basic groups of people.

    There are those who practice the same personable courtesies here in the cyber HP community that they utilize in real life...you know, the stroll through the neighborhood, the wave from across the street, and then the accelerated gait, maybe even a hop and a trot, over to where you've been working in the garden to say hello and pass the next ten minutes visiting.

    Sometimes, members of this group of people will even join you on the front stoop or porch to chat for a longer while, maybe even sing a few songs...knowing your personality, Dennis, and penchant for mischief, those precious few moments can sometimes turn into hours because people are just plain having a good fun time.

    Then, there's the other group...you know, the ones with dollar signs in their eyes that blind them from the humanity of this online global village experience. They're more about numbers than they are about social graces; more about the latest strategies to outmaneuver the Google algorithms, and more about Type A Personality behaviorism than they are about simply...slowing...the...rat race...pace...to...a...mellow...let's have fun...crawl.

    It is what it is, Dennis. You know what we baby boomers can do to cope with it? Continue doing what we've been  doing all along...greeting, acknowledging, complimenting, uplifting, encouraging, and sharing with each other. Just as those before us did, we've got to set a solid example that, hopefully, a remnant will latch onto.

    Thanks for the courage to ask the question and for the opportunity you've given me to share my response.

    See you at the next HP barbecue, Dennis!

    1. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You provided a fabulous answer. I guess the way to sum this whole thing up is this: "Different strokes for different folks." Also, I'm too naive to grasp the concept of algorithms. Shoot, I had to use spell check to just get it right.

    2. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Oh, how accurate that is, Joe (hawaiianodysseus).  We're individuals & behave like individuals.  In real life, one finds the same differences. Viva la difference!  Courtesy is never wasted &  sometimes inspires courtesy, IMHO.  Thanks for tha

  8. d.william profile image66
    d.williamposted 5 years ago

    Yes, you are being too harsh. There are a myriad of reasons why someone would read a hub and not comment.  When I read an article and see multiple comments posted and after reading those comments find there is nothing of any substance i can add to them, i just click on the feedback links and move on. 
    Just because someone does not comment on your hubs does not mean they are not following you. 
    For instance, i did an article on how to insure your blood pressure is accurate before starting medications, based on one elevated BP in the doctor's office.  So far there have been 1500 viewers of that article and not one comment.  I found it odd in one way, but felt happy that there were that many readers. 
    On another one about orange juice there were over 3100 views and only 16 comments were left.  So, it is not the number of comments you receive on any one of your articles that is important, but rather the number of views that article has had.
    I do not need positive affirmation on the articles i publish, but i do appreciate that people actually read them, and i respect their decisions not to leave a comment. 
    People who stop following someone just because they are not commenting on the articles that they read, may be missing out on some great articles in the future.
    We cannot follow every single article that every person who follows us writes,  and vice versa.   We read articles that catch our attention, and if we feel passionate enough about the article we will be compelled to leave a comment.
    If those 1500 viewers of my BP article, and the  3100 viewers of the O.J. article each left a comment i would still be answering those comments at the expense of excluding all others.

    1. MarleneB profile image98
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. Just thinking out loud here. How long would it take to read through... and comment on 1500 + 3100 comments. That would surely take a bite out of your productive writing time. Right? Just saying I agree with you.

    2. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Excellent points.  There is this, though:   views don't equate with reading the articles.  Comments acknowledge that the article has been 'tasted' at least; good comments reflect what's made an impression.  Valuable for writer to know. Give & tak

    3. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I only asked this question because I observed, then questioned and was curious what others thought. I'm certainly  not looking for hubbers to fawn over every article I write. That wasn't my intent when asking the question.

    4. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      We find time for the things we value, such as asking & answering questions such as this.  But each of us must prioritize our time, certainly. All others' comments needn't be read in order to add a comment on a hub, btw, That does take lots of tim

    5. d.william profile image66
      d.williamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Pagesvoice: i have read many of your hubs and do apologize for not taking the time to acknowledge my visits to your site.  Would you like me to re-visit and comment on those i read?

    6. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      d. Williams - Thanks for the acknowledgement. "No" there's no need to do that...I checked my old ego at the door years ago. LOL

  9. innerspin profile image92
    innerspinposted 5 years ago

    Sometimes I try to leave a comment but get bounced off. It's irritating when I've written a few lines, press to submit, then jump to the top of the hub. Refreshing the browser doesn't help. It just happens on some hubs. If I like the hubber's work, I may choose to follow and leave fan mail. Never thought it would make anyone cross if I followed without commenting!

    1. d.william profile image66
      d.williamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Some people simply need constant affirmations of their self worth.

    2. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That kind of mechanical or electronic glitch is a pain, innerspin.  I can see your point if you use another resource to express your appreciation.  As for affirmations of our work, all comments have value - pro or con.  No one hates strokes, though.

    3. innerspin profile image92
      innerspinposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I don't think that's a fair comment, d.williams. pagesvoice was asking something that puzzled him, not asking for everyone to leave great comments. The responses have been very interesting.

    4. Seeker7 profile image95
      Seeker7posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've had that as well - comments getting bounced -  and I used to blame my old computer until it happened on my laptop - absolutely infuriating!!! By the time I get round to getting a comment accepted, I've usually forgotten what the hub was about!

    5. d.william profile image66
      d.williamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I wasn't referring to Pagesvoice with that remark. It was a generalized statement that most people DO expect praise & acknowledgment.That is evident if U dare 2 disagree.I was recently told by 1hubber he  only wanted affirmative comments.I d/c'd

    6. innerspin profile image92
      innerspinposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for clarifying d.william.

    7. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's a shame, d.william!  I can't even imagine only accepting or wanting positive reinforcement!  How would one ever know if it were sincere, if it's all one will accept?  Absurd.  No wonder you were turned off.

    8. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No, we can't always leave songs of praise, even for our favorites here. A writer friend of mine, long before HP wrote an article that I liked and shared, yet I still disagreed with them on one section. It's the give and take that makes us all better.

  10. wqaindia profile image46
    wqaindiaposted 5 years ago

    When a hub author or members send a fan mail, it is only after reading the hubs authored by him/her. What to talk of replying or commenting on the Hubs the members including me even forget to mark it as useful, interesting or funny. Comments pour in after the members exchange views and develop a hub community relationship.

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hi, wqaindia.  Interesting thoughts you've shared.  Like any relationship, those we share here on Hubages are built, thoughtful response upon thoughtful reply to it.  Comments are our best resource for doing that.

    2. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Personally, I couldn't agree with you more. In fairness, there are others who disagree with us and that is perfectly fine, as well. I guess it boils down to what works for us.

  11. Nellieanna profile image80
    Nellieannaposted 5 years ago

    Commenting isn't just a matter of critique or support of a hub, but is for acknowledging that one has lent presence to & has seen it, with following showing intention of supporting the Hubber's future work.  Mere number of "views" don't give a writer anything pro or con, except perhaps for the sake of 'hits' for seeing Google ads on a hub. Leaving a comment takes it to a one-to-one level.

    Following a Hubber without so much as acknowledging him/her by commenting seems patently self-serving & ill-mannered.  Fan mail at least takes time to acknowledge the person, perhaps on the basis of an outstanding profile and shows real interest in reading more.  But merely following when no hubs have been read or acknowledged, motives are questionable. 

    It's fairly common knowledge that some new Hubbers who have written no or minimal profiles and who've published few or no hubs follow hundreds of active hubbers.  It's transparently an effort to 'work the sytem' for their benefit with no regard for others involved.

    I knew that one can eliiminate those one follows if they have shown themselves to be Hub-deadbeats, but I didn't realize it's possible to eliminate those hangers-on's who've latched on as empty followers.  Is it?  Tell me how!

    1. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You don't have to follow them back so what's the harm in allowing them to follow you? Do you write a letter to the author after every book you read? how about magazine articles? I think it's pretty unrealistic to expect everyone to comment.

    2. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for your reply & thoughts on it.  This is fairly subjective, isn't it?    If no comments, why follow, - why not just remain anonymous then?
      I don't write notes to book authors.  They're commercial; I've bought the book, which acknowledges

    3. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I guess it all boils down to our individual expectations. I see many different views on this question. I posed the question because this scenario happened to me twice within one day.

    4. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Pages yes it is individual & valuable to see these different replies to your question.  Hubpages is a place to test one's writing wings, so peer responses to our work really influence & help us hone our craft.   It's one of HP's major values.

    5. d.william profile image66
      d.williamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      N.A: U've 819 followers & follow 124. Can U possibly read all articles of the 819, or comment on all 124? Writers prdce a variety of hubs, do they all interest everyone. UR doing UR-self a dis-service by missing other great articles 4 lack of pra

    6. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Of course not, d.william. That's not a question here.  I will have read & responded to some of their work when I became their followers & wrote fan mail to them; I follow so I can see what else they write & read if possible.  I watch &amp

  12. Novel Treasure profile image88
    Novel Treasureposted 5 years ago

    I have often written fan mail and not left comments on a hubber's articles. I don't think they are both required. I leave fan mail to be inspiring and uplifting and to welcome hubbers to the community. I do not always feel compelled to write a comment on their hubs.

    Fanmail and comments are not the same thing and I don't believe that one should be required without the other. Also, you can read and vote up on articles without leaving comments.

    I'm sure there are those that are sending fanmail simply to gain followers and I can understand your frustration with that, but don't criticize or penalize others who are truly sending you a fanmail.

    1. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you and so many others here who have given me a whole new perspective. My question is a perfect example of exchanging views and opinions and I love the feedback this has given me.

  13. cre8ivOne profile image76
    cre8ivOneposted 5 years ago

    I know what you mean.  Many of my articles, poems, how-to's have decent traffic but it doesn't always seem like they are giving any kind of feedback.  This is very frustrating considering the amount of time I have taken on some of these pages!  A fan who only writes a raving fan mail and never bothers to comment to the same affect on even one hub I would wonder the motives.  But again I say, some people read lots of articles but never comment, vote up etc.  It's a shame too because those are the ways we writer's see that our article has had a purpose.

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It DOES take time to be a participating member of Hubpages; indeed of any active community. The commitment to it needs to be considered when joining.

    2. cre8ivOne profile image76
      cre8ivOneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      For sure Nellieanna!  We are all here to be taken seriously and interaction, collaboration and feedback are all certainly within the spectrum of Hubpages and everyone who joins should try to participate in all areas.  smile

    3. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      As in any interaction with others, though, each expresses him/her self & has that right.  We can never know all the factors governing others' actions.  But whether work, marriage or parenthood or other commitments, there are reasonable expectatio

  14. profile image0
    Justsilvieposted 5 years ago

    You are being a bit harsh.

    The people I follow write so many interesting Hubs and to be honest, I really don't have the time currently to really write a note on every one I read, as much as I would like too and the “well written Hub, voted up and sharing” sentence seems to be a bit redundant after awhile.

    I like to show my support by voting up great hubs and sharing them with as many sources as possible. Please guys remember only a tiny percentage of your readers will actually give you feedback but may still love your writing… and wait with bated breath for your next written word.

    1. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Actually, your answer makes perfect sense to me. I totally forgot about the power of "sharing." That is one area I really do need to work on.

    2. d.william profile image66
      d.williamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      J: thank U for being honest.I was beginning 2 think i was totally off base.My articles R there 4 people 2 read whether they agree 2 contents or not.I don't need personal affirmation as 2 their worth. They R meant  2 inform & give another POV.

    3. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      My eyes have certainly been opened and I have a totally different perspective today than I did yesterday.

    4. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Again - each may show support in different ways suited to his or her personality and perspective.  It's what makes it all so interesting.

  15. cam8510 profile image96
    cam8510posted 5 years ago

    I believe strongly in commenting in hubs.  I don't think I've ever read a hub and not commented.  We all know the work that goes into these articles, and supporting each other in the comments area is part of being a member of the community. 

    I do not think it is being too harsh to refuse to follow someone who has not shown this basic courtesy.  There is no quick and easy way to building relationships here or in our "real time" lives.  It takes being able to give in authentic, meaningful ways and the ability to graciously receive. 

    Following, without any other contact is simply a way of accumulating numbers which will actually accomplish very little here on HubPages.  It is all about interaction and that is one thing I appreciate about the scoring.  It is based on interaction, not numbers. 

    Here's to supportive comments and gracious replies.

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ditto!

    2. profile image0
      Vickiwposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ditto, ditto!

  16. Express10 profile image88
    Express10posted 5 years ago

    No you are not being too harsh, but it's also important to keep in mind that many hubbers simply will not comment on every hub they read for various reasons. In my experience of just a year or so here I don't always have something special or different to say from other commenters who may have beaten me to the hub and many hubs that I read have dozens or hundreds of comments. In these cases I certainly read, vote, and choose one or two positive and applicable comments next to the vote button.

    1. Nellieanna profile image80
      Nellieannaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's valuable, too, Express.  But you never know how much it could mean to the writer who's taken time to present something of value for you to read,  to see your personal comment, too, if only, "Wow" or "Really?"  :-)

  17. Gail Meyers profile image84
    Gail Meyersposted 5 years ago

    My gosh, you're harsh Dennis!  (Just kidding)  Now that you mention this I think I always read and comment on a hub prior to sending fan mail.  It just seems strange not to.  Of course, they could have been bedazzled by you in the forums.  (Just a wild guess/possibility)

  18. profile image0
    Vickiwposted 5 years ago

    I know how much I love having comments on my Hubs, and I love leaving comments on Hubs by others! It is a great way to learn so much from others, and as far as I am concerned, it is as important as writing my own Hubs. Sometimes when I want to follow, I just follow, but don't write fan mail. I don't mind if others do the same. But as far as I am concerned, I don't ever decide to follow unless I have read other hubs, and commented.

 
working