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jump to last post 1-15 of 15 discussions (15 posts)

At what age do you think children should start helping you with the dishes?

  1. MellyMoo profile image61
    MellyMooposted 6 years ago

    At what age do you think children should start helping you with the dishes?

  2. tallglassofsass profile image82
    tallglassofsassposted 6 years ago

    Every child develops at a different rate.  To pin point one specific age would be difficult.  I'd say that as soon as a child is interested in what you're doing while you're taking care of the dishes, that is a good time to start letting them help you. I have a large kitchen drawer where I keep the kids' dishes, cups, and utensils.  My 7 year old boy could not figure out this drawer if Spiderman himself were to guide him.  So I just ask him to hand me things from the dishwasher.  However, my 2 year old girl knows where almost everything goes.  So she takes care of the kids' things, and a few other things in the kitchen that she can access safely.  It's nice for bonding, having your kids help you in the kitchen.  I like to think I'm teaching them that activities like dishes don't have to be such a drag.  Of course... when I need to get the dishes done fast... the kids go in another room.

  3. ComfortB profile image86
    ComfortBposted 6 years ago

    I started my kids at the age of 6. They wash, I rinse. We made it fun, bursting out the bubbles etc. Now that they are in their teens they think its torture, and I think it's fun.  lol.

  4. CaravanHolidays profile image60
    CaravanHolidaysposted 6 years ago

    As soon as humanly possible and safe - turn it into a fun activity not a chore - they need to learn responsibility a.s.a.p.

  5. breathe2travel profile image79
    breathe2travelposted 6 years ago

    My three year old helps me with the silverware and plastics.  My five & six year olds are capable of putting away every dish, and my two oldest children know how to load the dishes. Each child is responsible to clear their place setting, and if tall enough, rinse their dishes and load them after a meal. smile

    Barring handicaps, I believe most children by the time they can walk are capable of "helping", even if it is clearing only plastic cups. smile

    Warmest regards~

  6. wingedcentaur profile image84
    wingedcentaurposted 6 years ago

    I think ten years old (fifth grade) is a good age. Its not too old and not too young, in my opinion. They're fifth graders, thinking of themselves as almost-adults anyway; they're about to enter the big SIXTH GRADE, where everything, everything changes.... Ten years old is good, I think. Any younger and they will likely break more than they wash.

  7. vianasya profile image57
    vianasyaposted 6 years ago

    I think children should start it as soon as possible. But first of all, we must remember not to force them, just simply pursuade them to do it. Make 'the order' sounds interesting, so they will do it with fun. Don't forget to always supervise the children. Especially the younger children.

  8. Dexter Yarbrough profile image82
    Dexter Yarbroughposted 6 years ago

    I don't if there is an actual "age" when children should start washing dishes. I think it has to do with their level of maturity in terms of handling this chore.

    For instance, some children can handle washing dishes at age 5 and others aren't ready to help until age 8. Above all things, safety must come first. Oh, and make it fun!

  9. MazioCreate profile image70
    MazioCreateposted 6 years ago

    I can remember standing on a chair beside my Mother when I was 3 and she was handing me cutlery and small plates to dry.  My many brothers and sisters all started helping with chores from a young age.  It was never seen as onerous because we always had Mum or another sibling along side.  Over the years, time spent chatting at the kitchen sink helped deepen bonds with my sisters and brothers.  When given encouragement and assistance, a child can start helping as soon as they can hold a tea towel.  Okay, maybe a little older, but this does teach them a sense of responsibility for what happens in the home and they don't rely on their parents for everything.

  10. delaneyworld profile image79
    delaneyworldposted 6 years ago

    When my daughter started to show interest in helping around the house, I would find ways to make it work for her.  She helped with the dishes at two and a half.  She could rinse quite safely and then place them on the counter.  I think if you adjust the chore to their level, it's a great thing!

  11. profile image0
    Lynn S. Murphyposted 6 years ago

    My son became the "bubble master" about 4 years old - because he wanted to help  do the dishes. Of course he had to stand on a chair and have help. But he had fun. I had fun. It was a total win win.

  12. Jackie Lynnley profile image91
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 6 years ago

    It should be by 10 at least I think. That's when they start dating now isn't it? lol
    Just kidding, but my sister-in-law raised a daughter that could not do dishes and I thought that was the most ridiculous thing I had ever heard of. It turned out she could do little of anything else either, so something as simple as dishes might be pretty important.

  13. CWanamaker profile image98
    CWanamakerposted 6 years ago

    I would say that its good to get kids involved as early as possible. If they are curious about what you are doing, then why not involve them?  Any young child with a set of motor skills can be a little helper.

  14. mom0f2 profile image71
    mom0f2posted 6 years ago

    My son is 4 and daughter is 2, then they are finished with their plates they put them on the sink or counter next to the sink.  With un-loading the dishwasher they both help handing me things from it and but things away where they can reach.

  15. beautyspot2010 profile image57
    beautyspot2010posted 6 years ago

    My daughter is 8 and she loves helping with the dishes, how long that will last i dont know ha ha

 
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