jump to last post 1-24 of 24 discussions (27 posts)

Why are my cucumbers dying? How do I grow amazing cucumbers?

  1. CennyWenny profile image82
    CennyWennyposted 8 years ago

    Why are my cucumbers dying? How do I grow amazing cucumbers?

  2. queen cleopatra profile image89
    queen cleopatraposted 8 years ago

    Cucumber plants love shady areas with a bit of sunlight in the morning or in the afternoon. If you planted your cucumbers directly under the sun, construct a sort of shading roof. Something with a net covering to screen the heat from your plants. Also, water in the early morning or in the late afternoon. Hope this short explanation answered your question. smile

    1. profile image61
      BethMartinHolyokeposted 8 months agoin reply to this

      Great answer! Thank you

  3. Bob Ewing profile image50
    Bob Ewingposted 8 years ago

    Cucumbers are from the subtropics and grow best at relatively high temperatures, 65-75 degrees F being the ideal temperature range. read more

  4. Pearldiver profile image81
    Pearldiverposted 8 years ago

    You are neglecting them and dying is just their way of telling you so.  Cucumbers are very sensitive to light, heat, wind, soil ph, humidity and every degree of kindness.  Check the underside of the leaves and look for mildew or pest infestation. Queen Cleo is right.  If you are unsure where in your garden you should plant any plants... the width of the leaves gives you the clue.   Wide leaves - semi light.. Narrow - full light. 

    If you want to ensure that you continue to grow amazing cucumbers; grow them from your own seeds.  In that way you avoid introducing the cross contamination which occurs in many commercial garden centers, but doesn't appear until you have nurtured the plants to the point that get really worried and ask everyone: "OMG, Why are my cucumbers dying?"   Apparently you can improve your success rate by reading them a well written Hub each week.... Bon Chance.

  5. profile image0
    dennisemattposted 8 years ago

    my cucmbers died last year...all of them..both times I planted. This year they are in direct sunlight and doing fine. The difference is I used a quality compost. Using your own seeds to avoid disease is good advice, but not so helpfull if all your cucumbers are dead...no seeds there..Try Johnny's Selected Seeds. They are gaurenteed and have loads of help on where/when/ how to plant.

  6. Cdejarnatt profile image76
    Cdejarnattposted 8 years ago

    The cucumbers we had were in full sun and the sandy soil was mixed with horse manure and they did excellent. They started dying off when we had over 22 inches in a two weeks span and it over-saturated the roots of the plants.

    We have now started some more plants from seeds in containers at the present and once big enough will replant in the garden.

  7. Gerber Ink profile image83
    Gerber Inkposted 8 years ago

    While your cucumber plants may enjoy being read excellent hubs, they also need a few other things, such as plenty of sun, adequate moisture and some fertilizer to boot. 

    What can kill them quickly is too much sun, too much water and pests in the garden, such as slugs, which love to much on them until all that is left is a green nub.  How sad. 

    I agree with everyone that you need disease free plants, so buy potted cucumber plants from a nursery you trust.  Alternatively, get seeds from reputable sellers, such as Park Seeds.  Next, plant them in amended soil- which includes the fertilizer and mulch materials that will help them grow and hold moisture in during dry spells.  If you're not sure what to do in this regard, buy a potting mix, such as Expert Gardener, and make the mounds for your plants out of this.  Plant them where they'll have a little shade during the day.  Finally, water them only when they need it- and do this either in the early morning or in the evening so they get the full benefit.  Too much water will result in scraggly yellow plants or ones that die of root rot.

  8. Keith S profile image60
    Keith Sposted 8 years ago

    All the answers can lead to weakened cukes. However, cucumber beetles are the likely culprit. The beetles munch on the leaves and by themselves wouldn't kill a healthy cucumber plant. However, the beetles are the vector (carrier) for the bacteria that causes cucurbits or cucumber wilt. The signs are first you see the beetles, then the leaves on your seemingly healthy cukes will begin to wilt, turn brown and soon the whole plant is dead.

  9. green age profile image55
    green ageposted 8 years ago

    I must be lucky then...or so I thought.

    Our cucumbers have been growing pretty well. We have them in a greenhouse and water them every day. We have had to add supports to them and you will find that they wrap their little twines around the supports.

    A few weeks back, loads of little cucumbers started to appear, one of them shining through as being the biggest. So we wait until yesterday to pick it (as it was about a foot long). To our disappointment it tasted like sour grapes, the damn thing wasn't ready!!

    Good luck with your cucumbers though! Just make sure they are fully ripe or you will get a BIG disappointment!

  10. Marty1 profile image57
    Marty1posted 8 years ago

    If you grow your Cucumbers below other plants such as Tomatoes they will provide beneficial shade. Cucumbers dislike really hot sun.
    Also they love lots of water, blood and bone, chook manure and liquid seaweed.
    Also mulch these lovelies to keep their roots cool and moist.
    Happy Gardening Marty

  11. Lor's Stories profile image61
    Lor's Storiesposted 8 years ago

    Maybe they are water-logged and full of seeds.
    At the end of the summer, my grandfather's cucumbers went too seed.

    Depending on where you live (like in NJ where I live) we have had a very wet summer thus far.

    Check the Farmers Almanac as well.

    Good luck

    Lorrie

    1. profile image50
      agreatkingposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      maybe

  12. reddog1027 profile image85
    reddog1027posted 8 years ago

    I agree with Keith S.  It is probably the combination of the cucumber beetle and bacterial wilt.  I have had trouble with it for a long time.  My plants start off just great, I even get lots of cucumbers of the vines and then...the next time I go to the garden, one of the leaves on a plant has totally withered away.  This withering proceeds a couple of leaves at a time until the whole plant is gone.

    To keep cucumber beetles of you plants, dust them with diatomaceous earth.  It is not a pesticide, it kills the bugs by scratching through the exoskeleton and they just dry out. That has helped me keep my cucumber plants going all season.

  13. ddsurfsca profile image76
    ddsurfscaposted 8 years ago

    many people make one mistake with all their garden plants, and that is watering the garden with a sprinkler instead of letting the water go up the rows and irrigating so that the water goes straight down to the roots and not on the leaves for when the leaves get wet, especially in the full sunlight, they burn, as the water magnefies the heat of the sun.  at the beginning of the garden sacrafice one hose and put small holes in it about as far apart as the rows in the garden are.  Then when you lay it out, and turn the water on slowly, the water only runs up he rows and not on the plants themselves.

    1. Insane Mundane profile image60
      Insane Mundaneposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I don't know how it was where you live, but most of the southeast US didn't need a sprinkler system this year.  It was the wettest summer we have had in a while.

  14. profile image47
    101 Centavosposted 7 years ago

    Agree with several of the answers here.  Water the roots, not the leaves.  If you have the ability to try different spots, do so.  Plants in one corner of your yard may like that spot over another that gets too much wind and/or sun.  Beetles and the resulting fungus can be a killer.  Try applications of Neem Oil or attracting the predatory insects that prey on the beetles.
    Try growing the cucumber vines vertically up trellises instead of leaving them on the ground.  Good luck!

  15. Andrea Mearim profile image50
    Andrea Mearimposted 6 years ago

    I grow my own amazing cucumbers i dry the seed out and start them in the greenhouse early  planting them in mircle grow vegtable dirt to start, when they get big enough, I plant them outside, i use a tomatoe cage or fencing in a circle or a A for them to grow up, they love sun and water  but definately need something to grow up that is very important, for organic pest control i use small amount of soapy water and chili pepers in my garden to spray around the garden.  save rain water they love that and there is vegetable fertilizer  with all kinds of organic stuff like fish guts and vitamins that can make them grow enormous.

  16. andersonKevin profile image56
    andersonKevinposted 6 years ago

    Cucumbers are a subtropical plant and require full sun. Cucumbers also require a decent amount of growing space, if you’re short on space, vertical structures can help make up for limited space in your garden.

    Cucumbers are happiest when the average temperatures are around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Plant your cucumbers in the late spring or early summer when there is no risk of frost. Even a light frost can kill your plants. Make sure your soil is well-draining and has a pH of around 6.5. Add plenty of organic compost to your garden soil before you grow cucumbers. This will ensure that they have the proper nutrients to grow strong and healthy.

    Adding organic compost is really one of the best ways to improve both soil drainage and balance soil pH. Applying mulch to your garden can also help your cucumbers.

  17. gpishev profile image60
    gpishevposted 4 years ago

    As some people mentioned cucumbers need sun and water. But there are several things you should know:
    1) always provide water for them before sunset and never moisture their leaves when the sun is at its peak. This way you will force them to dry and die.
    2) they are consisted mostly of water, but this doesn't mean you should over water them. Once daily is enough.
    3) Shade is not that important, but it depends on the seeds. There are many different types of cucumbers.
    4) Depending on where you live, you may lack of the required conditions like soil.
    5) One of the greatest enemies for cucumbers is the mole cricket. You will never see it, because it lives under the soil and it can ruin your garden. There are different types of poison you can use effectively for the pest control.
    If you provide more information, for example in which phase they are dying, how the leaves are looking, are they doted, I can provide more detailed answer.

  18. DDE profile image23
    DDEposted 4 years ago

    My neighbor plants cucumbers every summer and he has the best supply the plants are directly in the sunlight and away from other plants

  19. lostohanababy profile image59
    lostohanababyposted 3 years ago

    Try planting them on the shaded side of you home.  Water them early in the morning and late at night.  Don't water them in the hot sun.  If you are using a 'green house' to grow your vegetables, make sure you open their windows or have a air conditioning system set up, to cool the plants.  Get a book on Growing vegetables, that will be helpful to you are ask on line.  Cukes in the summertime is very healthy to eat and they hold a little water, that will keep you from getting, over thirsty, when eating at a barbeque or a outside / inside get together with family and friends.  They are awesome in other ways too.

  20. JacobCornell profile image80
    JacobCornellposted 2 years ago

    They love the shade and some times will not stop growing. Water them every day, make sure that they are planted in a well maintained garden with great soil.

  21. cperuzzi profile image97
    cperuzziposted 2 years ago

    Have you tried letting them climb?

    We've had tremendous luck letting them climb against chicken wire.  They ripen while hanging and if you keep the chicken wire no higher than 4 feet they'll curb themselves.  I find that if they aren't on the ground they get nice and big.

  22. roselinsojan profile image47
    roselinsojanposted 21 months ago

    May be because of some fungus, or some pest infection. examine it and spray pesticide.hope this will help you.

  23. Margie Lynn profile image94
    Margie Lynnposted 20 months ago

    I did not know cucumbers were suppose to have shade, I have always grown mine in direct sunlight! Learn something new every day!

  24. Deborah Minter profile image92
    Deborah Minterposted 7 months ago

    I like to add mulch to my cucumbers, that helps keep them healthy.

 
working