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When would you know that it's time to quit your day job?

  1. blacklion2277 profile image69
    blacklion2277posted 4 years ago

    When would you know that it's time to quit your day job?

    Some love their jobs while others hate it but have no choice but to keep it. That being said, how and when would you know that it's time to call it quits and get a new one?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7716499_f260.jpg

  2. toknowinfo profile image89
    toknowinfoposted 4 years ago

    I love what I am doing now. But years ago, I had a job I hated. Every Sunday night, before the work week would start, I used to say "YTW" - 'Yuck Tomorrow's Work'. If you say that then start looking.

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'm glad you've found the work you love toknowinfo. I think I can relate to that "YTW" thing. Thanks for stopping by.

  3. NicoleMessenger profile image74
    NicoleMessengerposted 4 years ago

    Well, if I had a day job and was unhappy; seek another job opportunity and make sure I had the position guaranteed. Then and only then, I would call it quits. However, if the your position is not a deal breaker for leaving due to income and that miserable then I would give notice of leaving or walk out. But keep in mind that if you want to return to another job, walking out on the spot is not the answer . Would highly recommend a 2 week notice. Hope this helps...Good luck. smile

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Walking out did actually crossed my mind but gave it a little more thought. A two-week notice seems a fair deal. Thanks NicoleMessenger!

  4. Born2care2001 profile image75
    Born2care2001posted 4 years ago

    This is an interesting question. Feeling trapped in a job you don't like is no fun. Feeling like you have no choice is even worse. I believe the first task is to recognize that you always...always have a choice. It may not necessarily be one that immediately gratifies us, but there is always a choice. A series of moves in the direction of the career you desire may provide a path to exactly what you want, as long as you have an idea of where you are going. Earl Nightingale defined success as "progressively realizing a worthy ideal." That might be a great place to start...having or developing a "worthy ideal." Until then, stay put or replace the income on the way to a new vocation. Chances are, if you're unhappy where you are, you'll likely be unhappy where you are going.
    Another old adage said " Was it better of me to find a job where I could be happy or be happy wherever I worked?"  The law of attraction would say one follows the other. Maybe that's when you know it's time to leave...when your happy and looking for a new challenge or adventure. Enjoy! Life is worth living, and it is all your choice!

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah I think you're right Born2care2001. Life is all about choices. I'll keep in mind the old adage you quoted, maybe that'll change the game. Thanks for your inputs.

  5. profile image51
    druhepkinsposted 4 years ago

    It's time to leave your job when you're conscious of the fact that you're unhappy. When you hate going to work every day, hate what you do and you're unhappy, it eats at the soul and can lead to depression.

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes I am currently unhappy and it's becoming a drag, but I'll still try to hang on until I find a better position before total depression sets in. Thanks druhepkins smile

    2. profile image51
      druhepkinsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      No problem blacklion2277 and good luck. You're mental health is worth more than money so I wish you good things and hope a change works our for you soon.

  6. jravity1 profile image69
    jravity1posted 4 years ago

    I believe its when you win  "THE X FACTOR."

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Haha! unfortunately I'm not much of a singer jravity1, but that's a good one big_smile  thanks

  7. duffsmom profile image61
    duffsmomposted 4 years ago

    A few years ago I worked 3 days a week doing billing for a therapist and I loved it. I was happy and excited to go to work.  Then that office closed and started working for another therapist doing the same kind of work. It was only 2 days a week but I dreaded it so much I was almost sick to my stomach before going each week.

    She hired someone else to help out in the office and one day I was gone and the gal did MY job and hers--the agreement was I do all the billing period as it is sort of a specialty with coding etc..  So I walked out. I am very territorial and this gal was way out of line.  I could tell when she was hired it would eventually come to this--and it did.

    I think I was waiting for an excuse to leave because I jumped at it when it happened. Don't miss it, but do miss the money.

    Having written all that I would say in this economy if you really can't stand the job, be sure you have another secure job lined up before quitting.

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I think I'm going through what you've been through duffsmom where I wished my days off where a few hours longer. I appreciate the advice you and everyone else shared. Thanks for dropping by  smile

  8. remaniki profile image78
    remanikiposted 4 years ago

    It is best to call it quits when you think you are not able to do justice to your job like it happened in my case. I was in a well-paying job and I had no complaints though I didn't love the job.
    I quit because of Rheumatoid arthritis due to which I wasn't able to manage home and office. Luckily, at the time, the company offered compensation for people retiring voluntarily and I grabbed the chance and got out.
    Of course the thought of having lost a good amount of money and status too does worry me even now but I know that life should go on somehow, so I am concentrating on other things.
    Good question. Cheers, Rema

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I like what you said in the first paragraph. Like you, I'm in a well-paying job, but it's just not about the money I guess. Thank you for your comment Rema  smile

  9. CC Saint Clair profile image65
    CC Saint Clairposted 4 years ago

    I'd know it's time once I realise I've stopped caring enough to NO longer do it to the best of my ability.

  10. profile image0
    Ghost32posted 4 years ago

    Great question, blacklion--but not one I dare try to answer in a paragraph or two.

    So, I'm off to write a Hub on the topic.

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'm glad the question sparked a bit of an inspiration Ghost32. Will be looking forward to read that hub. Thanks for stopping by

  11. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 4 years ago

    For me, it was the office politics, the fact that I as an adult over the age of 18 had to ask other adults when and if I could use the restroom, and a lack of decent pay/no raises. A sense of dread or dislike of going to work slowly settled in and that was quite enough for me.

  12. lone77star profile image84
    lone77starposted 4 years ago

    @Born2care2001's answer is awesome.

    I might add from my own experience, that you can create happiness wherever you are and no matter what your circumstances. It may seem difficult, at times, but you can always turn the situation upside down and shake happiness out of it.

    You are not your body. That's a great realization to start with. You are also not your name or your reputation. In fact, all attachments are not the real you.

    If you feel trapped, imagine stepping back from the planet. Go several million miles away, or several light years away. All of your problems will seem far smaller from that new perspective. Infinitely smaller.

    Realize that "right now" is not permanent. Picture your ideal and allow it to happen.

    1. Born2care2001 profile image75
      Born2care2001posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      This answer resonates with me lone77star and the realization that "right now" is not permanent is very "healthy." Thank you for the comment and for sharing your experience!

    2. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Creating happiness in an unhappy situation is something I need to figure first, I guess. Thanks for your wise advice lone77star.

  13. thecatgallery profile image62
    thecatgalleryposted 4 years ago

    When you get married and your spouse can support you both, which lets you finally devote all your time to your passionate abilities.

  14. MarleneB profile image98
    MarleneBposted 4 years ago

    Normally, when people say "day job", they mean, the job they have while they pursue their joy in life. Your details show that you mean the job you have, but you hate it, therefore, need to replace it with another job.

    It's time to leave your job when you start to hate it. Unfortunately, good sense dictates that you should not leave your job until you have a replacement for the job you hate. You still have bills to pay. Right?

    Anyway, don't live your life in a job that you can't stand to wake up for in the morning. You are not a cat with nine lives. You only have one life and if you hate your job you would be doing yourself, and the ones you love, a favor by quitting that job and finding another one. Don't live a miserable life.

    1. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yep, the bills are what I'm more concerned with, which only means I gotta act fast and get that replacement. Thank you for your comment MarleneB.

  15. poshcoffeeco profile image80
    poshcoffeecoposted 4 years ago

    You know it is time to quit when your freelance writing income replaces your income from the J-O-B. Residual income is great. I would aim to have 6 months clear where I have done this, then FIRE the boss. Imagine, if you can make more part-time writing than you do in a full time job, just think how much you could make putting all your efforts into your writing.

    1. Born2care2001 profile image75
      Born2care2001posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      A very positive answer poshcoffeeco! Does this come from experience? Have you written about this experience? Many of us would like to know "How" to get there.

    2. blacklion2277 profile image69
      blacklion2277posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I think that makes perfect sense poshcoffeco. Who needs a day job when your side income pays more. Just like what Born2care said, if this is something from experience then we'd love to read about it

    3. poshcoffeeco profile image80
      poshcoffeecoposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      This is something I am focusing on. Financial Independence or nothing, that is the ultimate goal and I hope and pray that this is the platform to achieve it. It's a long term goal and I am here for the long haul.

 
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