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jump to last post 1-39 of 39 discussions (39 posts)

At what point is it ok to quit your job?

  1. cjcarter profile image74
    cjcarterposted 7 years ago

    At what point is it ok to quit your job?

  2. Ludivine profile image60
    Ludivineposted 7 years ago

    I think that when the stress or unhappiness caused by the job jeopardize your relationship with your loved ones such as your spouse and children, then it's time to look for something new.

  3. mcrawford76 profile image81
    mcrawford76posted 7 years ago

    I think any time is okay to quit your job, but I was always taught to make sure you have another job lined up before you put in your notice.

  4. Sulal profile image37
    Sulalposted 7 years ago

    Generally I wouldn't quit a job unless I had another job lined up to replace it. Caveats are of course if the current job is causing undue stress, negative health effects, or not adequately compensating me for my work. Also if the work environment is overly hostile.

  5. BizGenGirl profile image89
    BizGenGirlposted 7 years ago

    If you're not at least moderately happy at your current job, you are not going to be as productive and efficient. So there are plenty of reasons to leave a job.

    I agree with the other hubbers though, make sure you have a plan B and C before you ditch plan A. smile

  6. Tusitala Tom profile image66
    Tusitala Tomposted 7 years ago

    If the time ever comes when you are 'heart sick' (if I might use that expression) and the job is really getting you down, it is time to leave.   Your health is at stake when it gets to this stage.

    I have left work, resigned without another job to go to - even migrated to another country with my young family.  But that was way back in the 1970s.   I don't know whether that would be such a good idea now. 

    Still life is an adventure - or it should be.  If you feel your job is really grinding you down - take the risk.   It could save your life.

  7. sangre profile image96
    sangreposted 7 years ago

    Try and have another one lined up. If you are being treated like crap and are constantly depressed at the end of the day, then leave it. You will be a lot happier.

  8. daskittlez69 profile image74
    daskittlez69posted 6 years ago

    When you have another one lined up.  You never want to quit a job if you can not substitute the pay check that you would have been receiving.

  9. padmendra profile image46
    padmendraposted 6 years ago

    Job does not only give you financial support but also give mental satisfaction in your life. It works like an internal power and a kind of support. However, you might require to leave it at a certain point of time due to quite a few  reasons like somewhere where your self respect is being hurt , looking forward for better opportunities, dishearteness from your job where it becomes difficult to prove your thought process and your view points and many other reasons.

  10. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 6 years ago

    When you have another (better) job lined up, have at least one year's bank savings, and other liquid investment assets.  Otherwise, you would be foolhardy to quit your job.

  11. writeido profile image73
    writeidoposted 6 years ago

    It's OK to quit once you have achieved some level of financial independence, home some other source of income besides the job and you're aware and planning on cutting costs while searching for another job or setting up a business.

  12. profile image50
    James Gregposted 6 years ago

    The time is right to quit when you have become tired or too lazy and have lost all passion in the job and are just coming to make your salary. There must be a passion in doing the job rather than just the money factor because then only do we learn and gain experience and are really helpful to the organization.

  13. animal-backpacks profile image60
    animal-backpacksposted 6 years ago

    There will come a time that your heart will tell you to quit your job. I quit mine when all it gave me was stress. At that point I began to travel and explore new places that I had never been to before. It was the best decision I ever made!

    Staying in a particular job when you are unhappy will cause undue stress and will only jeopardize your productivity. As such you will not be able to produce any output to the maximum of your capabilities which is of no use to yourself or your employer.

    So when your heart tells you to quit, and assuming you're not massively in debt, then go with that feeling. It often turns out to be liberating and for the best.

  14. profile image49
    pbgoreposted 6 years ago

    In my opinoin when you are able to earn at least 60% of your salary  from other sourced, then you should quit.
    Provided you do not have any loans or other liabilities.

  15. Dave Mathews profile image59
    Dave Mathewsposted 6 years ago

    I'd say that when you feel you have enough money in the bank to handle anything that might arise and still be able to live comfortably and enjoy doing the things you want to without worry.

    OR.....when you die.

  16. profile image48
    bruceirelandposted 6 years ago

    I think,if you are not satisfied with the atmosphere of your job,than you will quiet your job.
    http://www.zimbio.com/Weight+Loss/artic … +Slim+Sexy

  17. Guanta profile image73
    Guantaposted 6 years ago

    Only at the point where you quit your old job on Friday and start your new job on Monday.  I've always needed my jobs so I was always careful to line things up before I made a move.

  18. liftandsoar profile image79
    liftandsoarposted 6 years ago

    Wow, this is huge and also very personal.  So many variables.  Do you have dependents? Are there other opportunities?  Can you afford to do without the income?  Who else would be affected?  What would quitting do to your reputation?

  19. EmpressAwesome profile image58
    EmpressAwesomeposted 6 years ago

    As soon as you find one to replace it. Quitting before you have another job lined up is just going to cause trouble-- who knows how long you'll be searching for one.

  20. profile image35
    DatingWithSTDsposted 6 years ago

    If you can afford to quit, quit. If not hang in there till you have a new job.

  21. Kate H profile image90
    Kate Hposted 6 years ago

    When you begin to have a sense of panic inside as soon as you start to leave for work, that's a sign.  If you walk into the building and feel like a caged animal, get out of there.  If you get a bad feeling in the pit of your stomach just hearing the name of your company, you have a job that stresses you out.  If that is the case you are only hurting your own health by staying there. 

    I have to say though, that with the job market the way it is, you really do have to make sure you have a good source of income lined up first or you could end up worse off than you are now!  At least while you are looking you can take some comfort with you to work, knowing that it will all be over soon and you can forget all about that place!

  22. selfdefenselesson profile image59
    selfdefenselessonposted 6 years ago

    When you have plan b and have enough saved up funds to support you while your unemployed.

  23. andrewwilliams63 profile image60
    andrewwilliams63posted 6 years ago

    Quit when you no longer enjoy what you are doing..simple as that!

  24. profile image0
    nuvanposted 6 years ago

    When you have the feeling that the job is not contributng much to you or you unknownly are not able to give your 100% and you know that you have a backup plan of getting joined some other company for same more or less salary or reputation.

  25. DrMikeFitzpatrick profile image36
    DrMikeFitzpatrickposted 6 years ago

    having worked for myself from home for 20 years, and being "mentored" by many self-made millionaires, they all said the same thing. with your business if you can only work it part time, keep at it until you at lest replace your income you have in your job, but wisest to wait until you make twice what you used to in your job in your own business venture. i was not able to follow that myself, and i do not recommend doing what i did. i would always quit a job to do a business and "go for it". for a decade and a half, i was operating my small business ventures while having a job, had to live, but as i got older, i took a couple ventures from zero to 7 figures in a couple of years. okay, 3 times. for me it was worse to be somewhere my heart did not wish to be-working for someone else. all of us have success in our lives in one of the areas of life for sure. if you discover what is your highest value, and are able to live that value, work in it, and be paid well, COOL! prosperous regards and best wishes, Dr. Mike

  26. DexisView profile image73
    DexisViewposted 6 years ago

    Try to have another job...or the minute you win the lottery smile

  27. LegendaryN8 profile image57
    LegendaryN8posted 6 years ago

    When it's a logical and not an emotional decision (to put it bluntly).

  28. nabeelplus profile image59
    nabeelplusposted 6 years ago

    No room for advancement. If your company's workforce is stagnant, it means that your career won't be able to advance. An environment that offers no room for you to move up or take on more responsibility, no promotions and no rewards is not a good place to be in for long.

  29. maddot profile image81
    maddotposted 6 years ago

    At the point you find your hands wrapped around the bosses neck!

  30. R.S. Hutchinson profile image85
    R.S. Hutchinsonposted 6 years ago

    the answer is the same everyday: tomorrow.

  31. Maryam Sajjad profile image60
    Maryam Sajjadposted 6 years ago

    when  you lose your patience.it is the self alarm for you to get rid from it.

  32. myfacelikemirror profile image56
    myfacelikemirrorposted 6 years ago

    when  you feel that job give you not such expectation that you crave for.

  33. whiplashinfo profile image57
    whiplashinfoposted 6 years ago

    I'm stand is NO. Having no job has so many disadvantages especially in our time today when everything is increasing.

  34. Winnie* profile image71
    Winnie*posted 6 years ago

    Quit your job when it doesn't enrich... doesn't enhance your life and soul.  There's nothing worse than a job that brings you down.

  35. profile image49
    glennice2003posted 6 years ago

    When you wake up in the morning, dreading going to work, get there and dread being there, the stress of the job is killing you and your blood pressure is rising and falling during the day to a degree you just feel like you are ready to explode, its time to leave your job.  Yes, have something else in place.  If you are not able to retire or have another job in place, stay until you just cannot take it any longer, but while staying, prepare to move on and be able to take care of yourself and your dependents.  You do not want to be panhandling or living in a shelter or under an interstate/overpass.  The worst thing in the world is not having a place to lay your head at night and not having a place for your children to be safe and sleep or knowing where your next meal for you and your children will come from.

  36. dredcuan profile image40
    dredcuanposted 6 years ago

    If you can live even without having a job.  Financial stable in a way that you can support all your needs.  Otherwise, you need to stick with your job so you can earn more and get yourself ready.

  37. thejeffriestube profile image75
    thejeffriestubeposted 6 years ago

    When you are able to. Financially and emotionally. Don't ever stay in a job where you are mistreated. Nothing is worth that.

  38. myinjuryattorney profile image55
    myinjuryattorneyposted 6 years ago

    If you already don't love your job. In the end of the day, it is still your choice.

  39. Stephen Crowley profile image61
    Stephen Crowleyposted 6 years ago

    yes, once depression starts, logic has to be put away, your mental health is at stake. Logic says get another job first, or wait for savings or a business to start producing a steady income. But life is not like that.... sometimes taking the plunge into the unknown is what you have to do. http://stephencrowley.hubpages.com/hub/ … nd-Survive

 
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