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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (16 posts)

I believe we are responsible to confess sin in our thoughts. Must we confess whe

  1. no body profile image70
    no bodyposted 5 years ago

    I believe we are responsible to confess sin in our thoughts. Must we confess when we sin in dreams?

    I am literal Biblicist. If we are responsible for EVERY thought, do we confess  actions and thoughts we have in dreams as sin? Dreams are reflective of our conscious thought. If I thought it and remember it, and feel convicted about it, must I confess it as sin?

  2. ii3rittles profile image81
    ii3rittlesposted 5 years ago

    Jesus taught that the spirit will lead us to the the truth. If you truly feel you need to confess it, then confess it  to God. Confess the sin and the worries of the sin in your dream.

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have gotten the strangest looks when I have said I feel this way. People seem to think that dreams are free time with the mind but how can it be if every thought is accountable? Thank you for a bit of encouragement.

  3. Judah's Daughter profile image79
    Judah's Daughterposted 5 years ago

    This is king of a strange question.  Sometimes dreams can come to us as a 'temptation' (evil) or a test (proving) from God.  If you find you've given into an evil temptation in your dream and enjoyed every minute of it, without conviction, God may be showing you the insincerity of your heart/faith.  Now that you've been tested, it is up to you how you respond.

    If you feel the dream reflected the true desires of your heart and you 'sinned' within your dream, are yet remembering your dream and are dwelling on your dream, I would say God already knows, number one.  I think He wants you to be aware of the areas He wishes to cleanse.  If you feel 'convicted' now, then you should confess it as sin.  Close the doors that are feeding those desires so repentance can manifest in your heart.  Next time you dream a similar dream, you may just pass the test and wake up refreshed.

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I usually don't remember my dreams. I usually pray for any people I remember dreaming about. I confess any bad actions I have done saying that if my mind was right I would never have considered doing such a thing. Maybe I'm wrong to feel that way.

  4. ComfortB profile image86
    ComfortBposted 5 years ago

    Often times we have thoughts that are unholy, but we quickly rebuke them so as not to give way to the tempter.

    But when thoughts (impure and holy) are allowed and nurtured, they quickly turn into sin, and can sometimes manifest in our dreams.

    Our God 'is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart', so if His spirit convicts you of your thoughts, then by all means confess it.

    Remember, "...your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: whom resist steadfast in the faith,..."

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I totally agree. Our minds are capable of such evil. I have very few "bad" dreams anymore but I consider how I behaved in the "story." It disturbs me how at times I don't even think to pray or I don't think of God. Probably silly to think like that.

  5. Barbara Kay profile image92
    Barbara Kayposted 5 years ago

    First of all, is it something sinful that you'd like to happen? Is it a hidden desire you have? You must be talking about that type of dream. Then the sin is lurking in your mind anyways. You'd better confess it as such.

    I've had horrifying dreams that I would never want to happen. It depends on the dream.

    By the way, I think you are being too hard on yourself. God doesn't want us worrying so much about what we are doing wrong as He wants us to find the joy in following Him. Yes we need to quit sinning, but we should live under His amazing grace.

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've always believed dreams are thought processes working themselves out. They are in situations that you think you are acting rationally. Sometimes you don't act rationally, why? I don't know. But if I am convicted by God and feel bad, I confess it.

  6. iamageniuster profile image74
    iamageniusterposted 5 years ago

    I do not believe we must confess sins in our dreams. I don't even believe in confessing sins in our thoughts. Only actions are real and should matter.

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Bible  does teach we are responsible for thoughts and that we are supposed to bring "every thought into obedience of Christ." But I cannot rationalize in sleep as I do when I am awake. Thought is the birthplace of sin. The mind (heart) conceives it.

    2. ComfortB profile image86
      ComfortBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      What goes on in our hearts does matter. The words of 1 Cor.4:5 "... until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts..." the thoughts give birth to the actions. Song of

  7. stanwshura profile image75
    stanwshuraposted 5 years ago

    If you cannot control it, you are not responsible for it.  I thus feel absolute in saying that that applies to thoughts, dreams, psychosis, neurotic breakdown and/or thought processes, and any circumstance in which you are compelled by a sense of justice, life or death choices between bad and worse, and anytime somebody forces - yes, forces - that is a very possible and not completely rare event) you to violate your beliefs, God's Word, or the law - by threatening your life or welfare, and or that of a loved one, a child, an animal, or any other living creature.

    If it's not your choice, it's not hypocrisy, illegal, or a sin of any kind.

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I honestly hope you are right. Not that my sin isn't already forgiven. I just hate the thought of it. I can't wait until I'm in heaven and I don't sin anymore. I can see why it could be God making me see what would happen should I do a sin like that.

  8. graceomalley profile image83
    graceomalleyposted 5 years ago

    I haven't thought about this before - but what I do with dreams is go by whether I feel badly (true guilt) about what happened in the dream. Sometimes dreams are more reflective of where my heart really is - no inhibitions - and so a dream might be more an indictation of where my heart really is than my behavior. In that case, I ask for God's help (that's usually a part of the confession process for me - I need his help, or I wouldn't have done whatever in the first place.)

    But then sometimes dreams are just the flotsam and jetsom of the brain.

    1. no body profile image70
      no bodyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is exactly what I felt. Dreams are the what-nots of thought filing themselves away. But the idea of thought sin and I knowing somewhere my mind justified the thought long enough to act it out. I never had a weekness manifest as a dream though.

 
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