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Theists/Atheists: Can you compliment the opposite belief system?

  1. M. T. Dremer profile image94
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    Theists/Atheists: Can you compliment the opposite belief system?

    If you're a theist, what's something positive you could say about atheists? If you're an atheist, what's something positive you could say about theists? Please no sarcastic or passive-aggressive responses.

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 3 years ago

    I am a Christian and believe there are good and bad people on both sides. One's beliefs does not define their character. In the end we must accept that we just disagree about this topic. This does not mean that we cannot get along. I think we all need to work towards agreeing to disagree and get away from negative, hateful debates. We are all human and must coexist with everyone regardless of their own personal beliefs.

    1. koerakoonlane profile image84
      koerakoonlaneposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I'm sorry, but I don't understand which part of atheism did you wish to compliment in your message.

    2. Link10103 profile image75
      Link10103posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Considering how he thinks atheists are persecuting christians and are the downfall of the United States, it would be interesting to see what his compliment is.

  3. jjackson786 profile image96
    jjackson786posted 3 years ago

    I am spiritual but not religious, which would cause some people to categorize me as Agnostic. I do not believe in Christianity, but I do appreciate its followers' faith. I have always struggled to adhere to a religion- even during adolescence- but as I mature, I almost find myself wanting to be able to believe in something as strongly as Christians do. (Please do not interpret that as me wanting to become a Christian; I do not.) But I do envy their ability to place themselves so steadfastly in their faith, as well as the strength of their belief that there is someone watching over us in this terrible and ugly world. I have never been afforded that comfort from a religion, but I don't begrudge any one who has/does.

  4. profile image0
    Motown2Chitownposted 3 years ago

    As a devout theist, I am always grateful to the atheist who asks me to really take a harder look at the faith that I espouse. Doing that, IMO, really allows me to put legs on my profession of faith and LIVE it out rather than just talking about it. It teaches me to be grateful for every person God has put into my life, regardless of their ideas about faith.

  5. cjhunsinger profile image72
    cjhunsingerposted 3 years ago

    MT

    The gods were an answer to the questions, as to who, what, when, where and why. It was the first attempt to make sense, logic, out of what was observed and experienced by an evolving intellect. We began to define existence with the use of deity beliefs and to provide purpose to a life that was short and extremely brutal. Religion was the first science and the first answers.
    Americanized or Westernized religion embraces a sense of decorum and civility, a loyalty to the bonds of family and such is intertwined in the history and cultural development of America. Contributions of religious leaders are notable and are exemplified in the Gregorian Calender, which is now used by most of the world populations, a gift from the Catholic Church.
    Religions have made it possible for people of extremely good will to administer to the impoverished and backward. Ulterior motivations, as some may claim to convert those people, are probably true, but the good done by those individuals was and is a positive.
    Atheism and theism will never coexist in harmony, but, as Christianity was Americanized, I would not be disappointed if Atheism, once developed into a coherent philosophy, embraced the soft wisdom of theistic belief.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      CJ, my parents were married for 43 years until my father died. They had their ups and downs like any marriage, but in our house the atheist and the theist existed in harmony.

    2. cjhunsinger profile image72
      cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Miz--I was an Atheist, my wife a Catholic when were married 50 years ago. We were married in a Catholic church. My love for her was greater than for my Atheism. A different situation entirely.

    3. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, when two people love each other, they can work out the little details like atheism and theism like my parents -- and you and your wife did. Ain't it wonderful!

    4. Link10103 profile image75
      Link10103posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It's pretty simple to live your life with people of different beliefs. It's incredibly pessimistic to say theists and atheists cannot exist in harmony with each other. Borderline ignorant since plenty already do.

    5. ChristinS profile image96
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      My grandparents were also married for many years. My grandfather a devout atheist, my grandmother a former nun and devout Catholic.  They had a lasting relationship so it's interesting to see others with similar backgrounds smile.

    6. cjhunsinger profile image72
      cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Christin
      Those Atheist men are just rascals.

  6. Aime F profile image83
    Aime Fposted 3 years ago

    I think the sense of community people get from church is really lovely. My aunt's best friend is heavily involved with her church and hearing her talk about it makes it sound like such a happy, wonderful part of her life.

    I also envy having faith that they'll see their loved ones again/there is more after this life.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I do miss the fellowship of the church. The Unity Church has tenets that are very spiritual, not religious, and I used to attend, but like man's church, they couldn't get along and split. I got tired of their squabbling and left. No church for me.

  7. MizBejabbers profile image91
    MizBejabbersposted 3 years ago

    As I've stated numerous times, my dad was an atheist and my mother was a Christian. I loved them both, and I saw good in both my parents. I grew up in the church but I was influenced by my dad's belief in evolution and ancient civilizations. As a result I became a spiritualist and I believe each walks his own path in his incarnation. Theists do a lot of good in the world in the name of their various gods. They help humanity in their various ways. They teach their children to be good citizens.
    The atheist has been known to do the same except that he doesn't do it in the name of a deity. My father was a teacher for a number of years until he came back from WWII too nervous to teach. He spent many years working in a job, supporting his family and influencing his children to be good citizens. I never saw a vicious bone in his body. The average person may deal with atheists like my father in everyday life and never know that the person is an atheist.
    I believe you only hear of the radicals in each group, and those radicals can give each group a bad connotation.

  8. Frank Menchise profile image27
    Frank Menchiseposted 3 years ago

    I am a theist and as a theist point of view, the only thing that I find useful about atheists is that they can point out to us when some of us who are religious fanatics try to impose our beliefs on others; and above all when religion is no more religion and becomes a cult, and the people that run this cult become so aggressive and violent. That is the only useful thing about atheism.

  9. Link10103 profile image75
    Link10103posted 3 years ago

    No sarcasm? Darn...

    I appreciate that religion enables people to be happy. That is about as far as I can go without getting sarcastic or passive aggressive in all honesty.

  10. Snøwman profile image60
    Snøwmanposted 3 years ago

    This is a great idea.

    Dear Atheists,

    You understand that religion should be based on truth, not tradition. If you ever believe in God you want to know why you believe in God. Because your family believed it isn't a good reason, you want to know why you believe. Thanks for letting us have "in God we trust" on our money and "under God" in the pledge even though you don't believe in God. These phrases might not mean much to you, but they mean a lot to us. Also, thanks for listening to theists and seriously considering our beliefs even though you may not always agree with them. (for those of you who do this).

  11. jlpark profile image86
    jlparkposted 3 years ago

    I'm agnostic or more accurately probably an agnostic atheist.
    I like to learn about all religions - not to join but to learn.

    I would like to take this opportunity to say that most Christians or those of other faiths are usually very accepting of my questioning in order to learn.

    Also - the amount of faith a person has is quite something to admire and see - I remember watching a person was refusing something that could save their life - she was at peace with her God if it was her time. I still think of the experience.

  12. ChristinS profile image96
    ChristinSposted 3 years ago

    I was raised in the Catholic church and have a great appreciation for the music and art despite not believing in that particular religion any longer.  I also got an excellent educational foundation in a Catholic school.  I was taught by a nun from a very young age that if I could read, I could do anything and I took that lesson very much to heart.  As a result, I have often been able to teach myself to do things simply by reading about them.  smile

    1. Frank Menchise profile image27
      Frank Menchiseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Christin S, that is very true you can teach yourself lot of things if you can read them, I have done that myself. But what I am wondering about here is, are you now an atheist or do you believe in other religions?

    2. ChristinS profile image96
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I consider myself an agnostic atheist.  I keep an open mind, but I do not believe there is a deity as is taught in most religions.

  13. lone77star profile image84
    lone77starposted 3 years ago

    Of course. Every level of (relative) truth is valuable. Each is a step on the road to Truth (absolute).

    Your initial question (title) was about the belief system. The second question was about the people. Always, there is something positive to say about the people. They are children of God, even if they choose not to believe in Him. They are part of the whole. They are our brothers (genderless). We can only be made whole by loving others as ourselves and wishing for others everything that they desire.

    I have studied astronomy, nuclear physics, mechanics, electronic engineering, mathematics (algebra, geometry, trigonometry, matrix math, calculus and more), computer science, history, geology, archaeology, meteorology, planetology, space science and more. I understand the simple mechanics of these things. I see the patterns that tie them together.

    I have also studied religion and spirituality. I have studied Southern Baptist Christianity, Scientology, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Islam, Kabbalah and non-denominational Christianity. There remains a profound Truth behind all of these that explains the truths of science and the reality it studies.

    Atheists are our brothers. They are suffering blindness and deserve our compassion. They have not yet seen beyond the edge of physicality and know not the bliss of creation and spiritual Love. But all of us will eventually find this Love. It's inevitable. What isn't inevitable is the amount of suffering we must endure before we reach that point.

    Ego is the great corrupter. Ego is pure self-concern. Ego is separateness from others -- the antithesis of Love.

    When we give up self-concern, then we can start to know spiritual bliss and the mechanics of creation. When we Love others as ourselves and wish for them everything that they desire, then we heal the world. Suffering diminishes.

    Whatever an atheist wishes to believe, I wish for them also. But my heart aches at the tragedy of greater suffering awaiting them, by their own decision. For they are stepping off of a tall building; they are stepping in front of a speeding truck; they are pulling in heavy meteor showers. Their bodies will not last. Nothing physical ever does, but they will survive, for that is what spirit does.

    The best we can do for each other is Love.

    1. profile image57
      Norine Williamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Amen!

  14. levicolemagic profile image75
    levicolemagicposted 3 years ago

    Many Theists are genuinely good people who do not hesitate to help others in need.

  15. Say Yes To Life profile image81
    Say Yes To Lifeposted 3 years ago

    As a devout Christian who has recently turned agnostic, I can speak from both sides of the fence.  What changed me was being in a cult.  The experience taught me two things; 1) there is no cosmic Santa Claus, and 2) there is more than one way to think.
    Attending a Christian high school saved my life.  There I learned many valuable life lessons that still benefit me today.  Currently studying various religions, it's obvious that all of them are based on the laws of Cause and Effect, and how to best live in this world.
    Regarding atheists - I've personally known a few.  They too base their lives on the laws of Cause and Effect, which means they're just as ethical as everyone else.  The only real difference I've noticed is that they're more practical.  My childhood piano teacher was an atheist; he was a hard worker who earned $100,000 a year back in the 1970s.  My brother's wife is also an atheist; she handles multi-million dollar projects with her brother at IBM. Because they don't believe in praying to a deity for success, they're more humanistic in their approach, which apparently works better.  I need to do that for myself.

  16. profile image57
    Norine Williamsposted 2 years ago

    Yes, most Atheists are kind, decent, fact finding people!  However, we do not base our belief on facts & morality but faith & spirituality!

 
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