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Are Yahweh and Allah the same god?

  1. M. T. Dremer profile image94
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    Are Yahweh and Allah the same god?

    Christianity, Islam and Judaism are all 'Abrahamic Religions' stemming from the same source material. Though they all went off in different directions, it's not unreasonable to assume they are still referring to that original deity. This one god goes by many names (Yahweh being one of them) but, even though 'Allah' is the Arabic word for 'God', many have come to think of him as a separate deity. Are they all referring to the same deity? If not, when did they split?

  2. Zelkiiro profile image94
    Zelkiiroposted 3 years ago

    Yep. "Allah" is the Arabic form of the Hebrew word "El" which is their general word for "lord" or "god."

    El was also the creator god of the Canaanites and the chief of the council of gods before he was appropriated and crowbarred into Judaism, but that's another story.

    1. lovemychris profile image57
      lovemychrisposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I thought this was true as well,but someone told me it's wrong...ISis,RA,El...Is-ra-el.Have also read Jesus was from Syria. Shalom....they all use it,don't they.Peace be upon you.....they all obey,submit,worship...share, give, what is the problem!

    2. Robert the Bruce profile image61
      Robert the Bruceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Good points, Zelkiiro. Have you ever heard of this website? pocm.info
      The author of this website provides many documented facts concerning the Pagan origins of Christianity and Judaism.

  3. traveleze profile image53
    travelezeposted 3 years ago

    "God" is capitalized in English when the definite article is present or, less often, when it is presumed to be present. In other words, "God" really (literally) means "the god" (as opposed to "a god").

    In Arabic, the word "allah" means "the god". It is the most direct translation from Hebrew to Arabic for what we call in English "God". That, of course, does not mean that it is the same "the god" - but the words mean the same thing.

    Yahweh is a transliteration of the tetragrammaton, which is the Hebrew name of "the god". So, there is no dispute that "Yahweh" is the same as the Hebrew "God".

    Most Christians have a very different idea of God when compared to Jews (namely: the trinity). However, all Christians are convinced that their God is the very same God as mentioned in the Jewish Tanakh, and indeed a translation of Tanakh is included in all Christian Bibles. Although Jews would probably say that we Christians are wrong *about* God, I think that most would agree that we both worship the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

    Abraham is *claimed* to be the common ancestor of all 3 religions. This is important. IF we accept that the Jewish religion has its roots in Abraham as attested by Tanakh and the Christian Bible, that does not necessarily mean that Islam is likewise. The Christian connection to "Abrahamism" is clear: Jesus was Jewish, preached to the Jews, etc. Christianity is (in one sense) an offshoot of Judaism. The Christian connection to "Abrahamism" is directly through Judaism.

    However, the origins of Islam are historically independent of "Abrahamism". Muslims claim that Arabs are the descendants of Ishmael - but there is no corroborating evidence, in Tanakh or elsewhere. Muslims claim to be an Abrahamic faith - but Islam claims that their teachings come entirely from the angelic instructions given to Mohammad, not from any teachings passed down to Mohammad by Abraham through his descendants. In other words, there is no connection in Islam between the religion of Abraham and the religion of Mohammad other than the faith-based claim of Muslims that both are the same. While the Jews claim to have Abraham's religion as passed down by his descendants, the Muslims claim a sort of retroactive connection - that the religion given to them several centuries later by an angel is the same that Abraham practiced centuries earlier, but not the same as practiced and passed down by the descendants of Ishmael from Abraham to Mohammad.

  4. allpurposeguru profile image81
    allpurposeguruposted 3 years ago

    Yes and no.

    Historically, they are the same. The linguistic resemblance between the Hebrew El and the Arabic Allah is but one bit of evidence in that direction. (I am not aware of an Arabic equivalent to Yahweh.) The three great monothestic religions, collectively "people of the book" believe that the only way people can know God is through what he has chosen to reveal of himself. And as you say, all of them claim to have originated in Abraham.

    But ask a Christian, a Jew, and a Muslim to describe the true revelation and the character of the God they worship, and you will get three significantly different answers. Christians proclaim that God came to Earth in human form to rescue us from sin and its effects. No one can earn God's favor. It is a gift of love. The law of the Hebrew Scripture exists to offer proof of the impossibility of ever being good enough.

    Jews and Muslims both reject that narrative, but not quite in the same way or for the same reasons. In their own ways, both believe that God expects people to obey the law in order to be acceptable. Their ideas of God's character and substance of the law they are called to obey differ from each other as much as either one differs from Christianity.

  5. Rhonda Lytle profile image75
    Rhonda Lytleposted 3 years ago

    The short answer is no. Allah and God are NOT synonymous. While many trace the meaning of the names, anyone can call themselves anything they wish. I could call myself Lady Gaga but it doesn't mean that I am or for that matter that she is. I know for a fact that is not the name she was given at birth.

    Look to what the word of each calls upon believers to do and you will see they are as far apart as one side of the universe is from the other, though cloaked in much of the same language. When I say look to I mean read the texts, don't listen to what anyone including me has to say about it.

    I suspect the idea that they are different names for the same deity is based on Nimrod and the division of peoples and tongues though that was centuries before the birth of Christ or of Mohammed. While this idea of them being just different names for the same supreme being makes sense, it's false just like on paper a bumble bee just can't fly yet I see them buzzing around all the time.

  6. Radical Rog profile image80
    Radical Rogposted 3 years ago

    Whatever the name, the God of the Jews is the God of Abraham and Moses. The God of Islam is the God of Abraham and Moses, with Jesus counted as one of their prophets. The God of Christianity is the God of Abraham and Moses.
    As for when the different interpretations of the same scriptures began, its still happening today.

  7. aguasilver profile image81
    aguasilverposted 3 years ago

    No, 'Allah' is not the same as Jehovah, the Jewish and Christian God.

    Anyone who reads all three 'books' can easily see that the Quran is written by a different 'author'.

    Jews deny Yeshua totally.

    Christians recognize Yeshua as God incarnate.

    Muslims relegate Him to a prophet.

    But Yeshua stated that ALL power and authority, on earth and in heaven had been granted to Him.

    So either Yeshua was a liar (and therefore not worthy of being called a prophet) or telling the truth, in which case both Jews and Muslims are acting as 'antichrists' in rebellion to Gods word.

    The Torah had killing folk for unbelief as a position, as does the Quran, but Yeshua NEVER permitted believers in Him to kill, for unbelief, apostasy, adultery or any other thing.

    The Torah indicated that we are saved by righteousness, the Quran by submission and obedience.

    Yeshua states we are saved by Grace and Faith alone, none can ever be righteous enough, no one could ever obey sufficiently.

    So it's a personal choice, all three books offer different opinions about who God is, we simply need to choose the right book to follow.

    Come soon Lord Yeshua.

  8. MizBejabbers profile image89
    MizBejabbersposted 3 years ago

    The alleged passing of information from an angel to Muhammad sounds a lot like the alleged passing of information from an angel to Joseph Smith of the Mormons. I've seen both men accused of cherry picking the points from Christianity, Buddhism and Hindu to design a religion suitable to their own uses. I'm not sure where I stand on this, but if it does happen to be true, then I think it would make Allah and Yahweh the same god.

  9. Writer Fox profile image58
    Writer Foxposted 3 years ago

    The name of God in the Hebrew Bible has four letters: Yud Hey Vav Hey: יהוה. There is no accurate transliteration into English. Every other Hebrew word is built upon a root of three letters.  This is the only word that is a four-letter prime root. It is quite unusual and quite specific.
    This Name of God appears more than 7,000 times in the Hebrew Bible.  In contrast, it never appears in the Qur'an of Islam, or in the Christian testament.
    The word 'Elohim' is translated as 'gods' in English and refers to the non-human species of beings.  There are "myriads upon myriads" of Elohim (Daniel 7:10) and the God of Israel is the leader of a great army of Elohim, which is why He often refers to Himself as 'God of hosts' – the word 'hosts' means 'army.' The word 'Elohei' is the singular: " יהוה appeared to him the same night and said, 'I am the God (Elohei) of your father Abraham.'"  (Genesis 26:24) In the Bible, יהוה repeatedly commands that He is the only One to be worshiped – forever.

    In the Qur'an, Muhammad introduced the god of his religion as 'Allah.'  When Muhammad was born in Mecca in Arabia (circa 570 CE), more than 360 gods were worshiped at the Kaaba, a pagan shrine which housed idols. Each family had its own patron god and the god of Muhammad's family was 'Allah.'  His father's name was Abd-allah (servant of Allah). Allah was the pagan moon god whose symbol was the crescent moon.

    Unlike the Biblical prophets and kings, Muhammad was illiterate and his words were transcribed by others. Because he could neither read nor write, he learned what little he knew about Christianity from Greeks living in Arabia and he learned a little about the Bible from Jews.  It is obvious from the Qur'an that he really didn't know much about either religion and many points were remembered incorrectly.

    When he conquered Mecca with his army, he removed the idols from the Kaaba and commanded that only his family god, Allah, was to be worshiped. However, he retained many of the pagan rituals, such as circling the Kaaba seven times, kissing the black meteorite stone, throwing stones at a devil god and the use of the crescent moon symbol. Unlike Abraham who worshiped in Jerusalem, Muhammad commanded that his god be worshiped in Mecca and that prayers were to be said in the direction of Mecca, even if that meant turning one's backside to Jerusalem.

    Not the name, the customs, the commandments nor the place of Muhammad's god are the same as the God of Israel.  Not even close.

  10. RATHEESH A profile image59
    RATHEESH Aposted 3 years ago

    Basically the three religion started from one supreme religion and that religion doesn't have any specific name and these three religions are christianity, islam and judaism. These three religions worship and rituals are totally different from each other so I could say that Allah is the arabic word and worship by only Muslims and other side 'Yahweh' the word used by Jews from the beginning of their religion. So absolutely 'Yahweh' is a Jews' God

  11. Brooke Light profile image61
    Brooke Lightposted 3 years ago

    It is my thought that G-d, whether from Christian, Jewish or Muslim theology, is all the same G-d. The differences lie in the rest of the religious traditions and tenets. But when one actually reads about Islam and discovers that their traditions are still those of love and kindness, overall, which is the same as much of what is taught in the Torah as well as the Bible (especially the new Testatment), heavily implies to me that all three groups are linked back to the same source.

    I love to speak in analogy, and to me an appropriate analogy is that three different grandmothers can make chicken soup for a sick loved one. And all three will use different recipes, to some degree. But all of those recipes are basically the same (chicken, broth, noodles) and each of those recipes will satisfy the recipient in a way that no other version can.

  12. stas karimov profile image61
    stas karimovposted 17 months ago

    I invented the formula of universal weapon. And now I'll explain it. Adolf Hitler killed a few millions of Jews. Adolf Hitler wanted to kill all Jews. Hitler thought that he is the strongest in the world. When almost all of humanity attacked Hitler - Hitler committed suicide. We are brothers and sisters if we have the one (the same) enemy! All believers in the world have the common enemy - the devil. But the devil divides believers in different religions. 
    Every religion has its own prophet.
    If we will invent common for all religion - religion of happiness - we will win any enemy!!!!! And now the most interesting - I invented the religion of happiness!

 
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