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Do you think certain people are more susceptible to belief in a deity?

  1. John Colarusso profile image79
    John Colarussoposted 2 years ago

    Do you think certain people are more susceptible to belief in a deity?

    Do you believe there are certain types of people that are more likely to believe in a god? Are there any reoccuring themes? Different brain functions? Are just some people more likely to believe it than others? Or is everybody able to turn towards christ, or see logic and reason? I personally think maybe there is a link between certain brain functions and religious beliefs. What do you think?

  2. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    I believe (most people) who believe in God were taught to believe in him as small children. In many households little children are taught to say their prayers before going to bed each night, say grace before eating a meal, attending Sunday school or church services...
    None of it was by "choice".
    Even as adults some of them may pull away from attending church altogether but oftentimes they still remain believers on some level.
    It would be interesting to know what percentage of believers grew up in households with atheists or never attended any church services.
    My guess is there are fewer people who become believers late in life.

    1. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It would be very interesting to see if anythimg changed in the households of more atheists and atheist communities

  3. Oztinato profile image71
    Oztinatoposted 2 years ago

    Yes certain people believe in God: usually those with commonsense, high ethical standards such as compassion, honesty and selflessness.
    On the other hand most (but certainly not all ) disbelievers exhibit the opposite character and are frequently lacking in commonsense.
    It has nothing to do with biology at all but has everything to do with plain commonsense and ethics.

    1. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I know much more honest ethical atheists. I actually trust and believe my atheist friends much more than the christian ones I have. Because the christian ones had more tendencies to lie. And the atheist, as far as I know, haven't lied to me once

    2. Oztinato profile image71
      Oztinatoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      John
      my experience is totally different to yours. Also I do not limit my analysis to just one race or one religion.

    3. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Neither do I. My only question is why do you keep assuming I don't take into account everything? I am skeptical and a atheist for a reason. Taking into account everything, race, religion, lifestyle, statistics, conditions of all kind. Thats analysis

    4. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You don't need to be religious to have commonsense and ethics. There are lots of purported religious people, ministers, and priests, who have been proven to lack ethics!
      You as an individual decides how you want to live your life!

    5. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It alldepends on the person. Just cause they follow the bible doesmt mean thry are good. And just because i dont have a book telling mr what to do, nor threatened by eternal hell fire, means i am a bad person.

  4. aliasis profile image95
    aliasisposted 2 years ago

    I'm sure some of it is a personality thing, but impressions from being a small child probably help. For me, I wasn't raised religiously, and I also just don't think I have it in my brain to believe in god(s). It just doesn't compute for me. Nor does any paranoia about the afterlife, like fear of hell or whatever, really mean anything to me. Who knows, maybe it would've been different if I had been raised religiously, but at the same time, I don't think it's much in my personality either. My way of thinking tends to be more concrete. I don't believe in the supernatural of any sort, even though I think it's a fun idea, I can't understand why people actually truly believe in that sort of thing.

    Of course, I'm assuming we're talking more about a philosophical, generic belief in greater powers, rather than someone who gets really strictly into a particular religion, which is probably a different topic.

    1. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It is alittle bit of both. Just curious what others think, cause like me I used to be a strict b3liever and was raised mildly christian, but even though I was strict myself I remember always questioning

  5. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12729415_f260.jpg

    People who are very dependent psychologically are more likely to believe in a religion &/or deity.  They feel that they are unable to be psychologically independent & the masters of their lives so they turn to a religion &/or deity because these two components represent parental figures to them.  They want to return to a psychological childlike state thus they do this through religious belief.

    There are others who feel powerless.  Somehow they believe that they are unimportant enough to possess any type of power so they give their power away to more authoritative people &/or sources.  These are the second type of people who believe in a religion &/or deity.   They see the religion &/or deity powerful in a way that they aren't or refuse to acknowledge therein.

    There are passive people who feel that they are subject to fate.  They have the attitude of what ever be, WILL BE.   These are type of people who view religion &/or a deity as their projector as  to speak.  Whatever goes right or wrong, they can project those components to a religion &/or deity.  They do not & will never have to take the blame for their lives.

    There are people who love to escape & love escapism from life, especially its harsher aspects.  They really do not have a true grasp on reality & have what it takes to face it head on.  They want the universe, particularly THEIR universe to be oh so rosy & sweet, so they retreat to a religion &/or deity.  At least, such will protect them from the travails of the world as they see it. 

    Then there are spiritually oriented people who believe that there IS someone out there bigger than they are.  They know that there is an originator to the universe & lifeforms as they know it.  They may or may not be traditional religionists.  They see religion &/or a deity as an integral part of their lives.  They refuse to see religion &/or a deity as an excuse or escape from their lives.  In fact, they use their religion &/or deity to enrich their lives.  A fraction may even contend that they are part of the deity & the deity is part of them.

    1. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for selecting my answer.

    2. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I thought it was probably the most in depth and rational of them.

    3. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you again!

  6. getitrite profile image79
    getitriteposted 2 years ago

    According to studies, atheists tend to be smarter than believers on average.
    Research found those with higher IQs more likely to dismiss religion.

    Even among children, the more intelligent a child was the more probable it was that he/she would shun the church.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … tific.html

    1. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Even myself was a christian but always found myself doubting it

    2. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I have always suspected religion.  I thought it was for the more simplistic among us.  Even as a child, I found religion to be....boring.  When I got older, I thought it was foolish & left it COMPLETELY! I believe in God but NOT RELIGION.

    3. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      That happens. My fiancee believes in the christian god, but kinda thinks hes just an asshole. So she doesnt follow religipus dogma. But thats only if it is the christian god. She thinks there is something out there , maybe not the christian god

  7. Link10103 profile image77
    Link10103posted 2 years ago

    Think there  are a number of studies that show areas where education isn't as strong tend to have higher amounts of religious people.

    I have no trouble believing that either, based on some of my experiences on here.

  8. Asa2141 profile image83
    Asa2141posted 2 years ago

    I know I believe in God, and specifically the Christian God, because I see the evidence of Him.

    The archeological, scientific and historical proofs for Christianity compel me to believe. The Christian worldview also makes perfect sense of life and everything I see around me.

    All worldviews require faith but, to me, Christianity requires the least amount of faith.

    1. John Colarusso profile image79
      John Colarussoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Why?

    2. Asa2141 profile image83
      Asa2141posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Why what specifically?

  9. ValKaras profile image87
    ValKarasposted 2 years ago

    I think there are moralistically minded folks who, by their nature, thrive on seeing "wrong" forms of relating and coexisting. They feel in their full element when they can moralize about "right and wrong". Possibly they had very strict parent(s) who instilled into their survival arsenal this exaggerated cautiousness about "evil". Being predisposed that way, they are a magnet for religious path in life.

    There is another type I'd like to mention. Those are extremely insecure, and they need to "attach" themselves to something "mighty" as to form a functional self-image. They remind me of kids who always hung around those macho guys, like a bunch of minnows opt to swim close to a shark. Folks like that figure they are enjoying a divine protection, and that gives them confidence to manage through life's demanding complexities.

    I don't mix spirituality with religiousness. Spiritual people are those who want to evolve to a point of enlightenment  -  from within  -  by nurturing self discipline and positivism (count me in).  Religious folks have a belief system attached to something/someone outside of themselves.  They may not be advanced at all, may be negative, normative, critically minded, and unlike spiritual folks, they may not celebrate life, thrive on mystery, and they are not humble eternal students, having more smart questions than smart answers.  Instead, they "have ready answers to everything", while being in a constant need for a comfort zone of certainty.

 
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