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Do American Indians want the assistance of white Americans or no?

  1. tylermj23 profile image80
    tylermj23posted 5 years ago via iphone

    Do American Indians want our help or would they rather be left alone?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image84
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Those who own casinos, no.

      Those who don't, yes.

      1. couturepopcafe profile image61
        couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Well, yeah, who's doing the gambling?

    2. Pearldiver profile image87
      Pearldiverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Amazing.... I think your Horse Escaped 250 or so years ago mate! Why are you trying to Shut the Gate Now?? yikes

      Maybe someone could have asked that question BEFORE they killed the buffalo and just 'Stole' their land! sad

      Please Excuse my Candor... but maybe important things and issues in life are best resolved With FULL Consideration of ALL PARTIES as opposed to FORCE! sad

      Mind you... I guess that the cost of forcible action can always be billed against the party that was forced yikes
      Isn't that what happens with Iraq as well? sad

      Clearly others (non American) don't all agree with US Government or Custer policies! roll

      1. wheelinallover profile image82
        wheelinalloverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Well said Pearl Diver. My ancestors did not choose to be moved from their lands (Cherokee). They were the second most "Americanized" native culture in this country at the time they were moved. They were moved because others wanted the land they inhabited.

        The most civilized, the Seneca nations chose to be assimilated. They realized it was the only way the members of the tribes were going to survive. There were times the Seneca would make a gift, either slave or wife, of their marriage age daughters to people they feared or respected. For a young woman it was marriage instead of slavery. I am one of the later generations from this arrangement.

        I was never meant to be who I am today. I was raised to live "people" ways with their values and beliefs. Although I never accomplished many of the things my ancestors did, I was able to survive many times and situations just as they would have. One of the things my ancestors believed is a man becomes a man way younger than the American culture allows. Trials are given and if passed an "Indian" child becomes a man at age 13. For most of my life if asked, I would have said the only help I want from "America" is leave me alone. The heightened "fight for survival" I lived as a child is the only reason I am alive today. I would have been left to die by my "people" 20 years ago.

        1. Pearldiver profile image87
          Pearldiverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Thank you mate!  I speak always, from the heart and from a perspective well formed by experience.  Besides, I am a Proud Person also! smile

          Go Hard and Go Well my friend!  smile

          1. couturepopcafe profile image61
            couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Yes, I can agree with you on this, wheelin. The entire history is rather sad and often one-sided. Without going into it, I can say few of us are what we were destined to be.

            Modern America does not allow for the growth of it's young. It seems like this all started in the second half of the last century, though. Before that, this wasn't true.

            Every new culture, introduced into an established culture, is tried and persecuted, need to fight for their identity and often must compromise their values to survive. (I realize yours was here first)

            We can't change the past, only make the future better for our children and the children of others.

      2. crazyhorsesghost profile image75
        crazyhorsesghostposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I really appreciate your post there. As a Native American I see what the white man has done to the Native Americans down through the years.

        I am Sioux but I live in North Carolina and Florida and I often visit the Cherokee Indian Reservation here in North Carolina. They have a Casino but the money each tribe member gets is around $7000 a year and you can't live on $7000 a year.

        You should visit the parts of the Cherokee Reservation not usually visited by the white man. Much of it looks like a third world country.

        Do you know that not one treaty that was ever signed with the Native Americans was ever kept.

        North America first belonged to the Native Americans and I think we are owed by the US Government for what they did to our people. A lot of the land now owned by the US Government should be returned to the Native Americans.

        The US Government should offer to make amends for what was done to the Native Americans. But many tribes have been completely wiped out.

        I think I can safely say we want only what is owed to us.

    3. profile image60
      Paul Womancatcherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Good Question.

      I am choctaw/Cherokee—a federally recognzed member of the Choctaw Nation.  I work hard to speak Native languages and support my heritage.

      I live in Indian Country—Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, near Tahlequah,OK.  I live in a very rural area.

      just want what they (the Government) is obligated to provide by way of treaties duly authorized by the Congress of the United States.  This would include a portion of funding for health care hospitals and clinics.  We spend more than the govt does.  We want our sovreignty to be recognized — both here and by the United Nations. 

      Otherwise we are content to live our lives.  We just want to be left alone, otherwise.  We can do our business without the advice of the BIA.  BTW.... casinos provide a small percentage of our tribal income.  We have wire harness plants, we print greeeting cards for major punishments, we have made missiles for the armed forces, space heaters for the USMC, high-end telecom services, we operate US Passport offices all over the world with a user rating of 99% satisfaction for the State Dept.

      Meet your treaty obligations and we wont bitch about anything whatever.

      BP Womancatcher

      1. Irish Commentator profile image61
        Irish Commentatorposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Hi BP Womancatcher, Choctaw, I know nothing of your culture and heritage. I do know your ancestors helped us 150 years ago. Thanks. I like to follow you for a while.

        1. profile image60
          Paul Womancatcherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Hi Irish,

          Yes, we are so pleased that we were able to assist the Irish people during the famine. There is a special bond between our people.  Its great that our Chief and your Prime Minister (Is this the correct title?) have visited together and discussed our common historical heritage.  The Irish have always been good to us too—like the French, but more so.

          Thanks for your friendship with our tribe.  BTW, I married an Irishwoman—Kathleen O'Brien!  We love Ireland.

          Womancatcher

          1. Irish Commentator profile image61
            Irish Commentatorposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Hi Womancatcher, or should I say Mr. Kathleen O'Brien.
            Probably one of the O'Briens of Munster whose ancestral home was Dromoland Castle. Maybe you guys own it now!!
            Anyway, how do Choctaw keep the culture alive during the year?
            It strikes me that by knowing deeply suffering, your tribe was therefore sensitive to the suffering of others and had the capacity to reach out.
            Irish Commentator..

            1. profile image60
              Paul Womancatcherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Hey Irish,

              We keep the culture alive in many ways.  First of all, there are over 200,000 of us nowadays. We teach the Choctaw language in our schools and we have a robust language programs for adults who have lost their ability to speak it.  We have many, many social events and a HUGE annual celebration in the fall that features all kinds of cultural learning opportunities and entertainment.  The food is the best part!  Indian tacos are my favorite.

              Choctaws attend lots of inter-tribal pow-wows and we dance traditional dances  at every opportunity.  We have a university that essentially attended by Choctaws only (it is open, of course to anyone) Southeast OK University.  We also have joint events with the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians from time to time in Phildalphia, MS.  All members receive a very detailed and in-depth tribal newspaper "Bishinik" every month.  Moreover, we own and operate sophisticated hospitals and clinics
              throughout the Choctaw Nation.  There are
              numerous tribal enterprises, most manufacture goods for the US government—missile systems, wiring harnesses, management consulting services, and we operate all foreign US Passport offices for the State Department of the US.  So, we honor our cultural heritage as we move forward into the future.

              Womancatcher

    4. Dale Hyde profile image85
      Dale Hydeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      American Indians? You mean those whose heritage comes from India?  How about Native Americans?

      1. couturepopcafe profile image61
        couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        What's the difference? An indian is an indigenous people group. Unless you mean Indian American, like Italian American, African American, etc.

  2. Cagsil profile image61
    Cagsilposted 5 years ago

    They would probably prefer white man keep white man laws to the white man and leave them alone in that aspect.

    Do they want assistance? I'm sure they could use assistance, but rather not be dictated to if at all possible. They probably don't want the assistance, unless it's like Paradigmsearch stated. lol

    1. couturepopcafe profile image61
      couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I'd like that deal. Assist me when I need it and don't bind me to it's rules. Seriously, I'm not being facitious. It would be very pleasant.

      1. profile image60
        Paul Womancatcherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I am a Native American.  I'm a member of the federally recognized Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

        Please understand that we receive NO assistance that does not flow from Treaties (Contracts if you will) with the United States Govt.  We only want what we are due under the terns of these documents executed by presidents and ratified by congress.

        Womancatcher

  3. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Based on the "assistance" so far, I bet they wish they never received any of it.

  4. cclitgirl profile image96
    cclitgirlposted 5 years ago

    There's a quote I've seen around: "Sure, you can trust the government.  Just ask any American Indian."

    1. lobobrandon profile image83
      lobobrandonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      By American Indians do you mean Indians in America??
      If yes, I'd love to live together and help each other if I was there (I'm Indian). I never judge anyone by their country or any other background. If there are different types of people within a family itself just imagine the variations in countries.

      1. cclitgirl profile image96
        cclitgirlposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, lobo - the American Indians that inhabited the continent of North America before European settlers began arriving.  After that, the US and Canada effectively moved them from their original lands onto reservations, after trying to make them slaves in many cases.  Many treaties were made and broken between the US government and American Indians.  Wow.  I could write a hub about this...I am part Navajo myself.

        1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
          Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Write one and I'll link it to my Native Americans series!

          1. cclitgirl profile image96
            cclitgirlposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Patty, you rock.  Your posts do, too.  I look at them trying to emulate their professionalism, quality and authorship.  Bravo!

        2. lobobrandon profile image83
          lobobrandonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Oh those are red Indians then smile

          1. kerryg profile image85
            kerrygposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Just for future reference, the term "red Indian" is considered to be offensive. "Native American" or "American Indian" are the modern terms in the US.

            1. Cagsil profile image61
              Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              You mean "political correct" term? lol

              1. kerryg profile image85
                kerrygposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                No, I mean the "polite" term. Political correctness goes too far sometimes, but that doesn't make it any more appropriate to go around calling people by names that are outdated and racist.

                1. lobobrandon profile image83
                  lobobrandonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Thank you guys for letting me know about it

                2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
                  Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  +1

            2. mythbuster profile image84
              mythbusterposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              "Aboriginal" might be acceptable, too. Similar feelings exist for Canadian Natives but perhaps in Canada we prefer "Aboriginal" to set us apart from the heading "Native Americans" because, well - we're Native but are not Americans.

              I'm Metis, by the way.

              myth~~

          2. Cassie Smith profile image64
            Cassie Smithposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Do Indians think of Native Americans as Red Indians?  Most Indians tend to be darker than Native Americans.  Do Indian immigrants think of themselves as Black Indians to differentiate?

            1. lobobrandon profile image83
              lobobrandonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              That's what Columbus called them; sorry if it's offensive I didn't know anything about it.

              1. prettydarkhorse profile image63
                prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I think that colonizers seem to call people at the place when they arrive "different name" and as time passes by, that term is "offensive" as the people will realize later on

                1. lobobrandon profile image83
                  lobobrandonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Ya I seriously didn't know about it - now I know

              2. profile image60
                Paul Womancatcherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Lobo,

                There are well over 300 different Native American tribes in the US.  The physical appearance of Native Americans can vary rather dramatically.  Some are very dark skinned, others not so much. I am a Native American, and an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.  I say "Nation" because we believe we are sovereign  within the borders of reservations or other agreed upon borders.

                BTW, you have not said nor have you done anything to offend Native Americans.  There is no reason why you ought to be acquainted with all the "political correctness" surrounding Indian/White relationships.  You have been most respectful.

                Best regards!

      2. tylermj23 profile image80
        tylermj23posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I was referring more specifically to Native Americans and those Indians living on reservations.

        1. wheelinallover profile image82
          wheelinalloverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          The "people" who leave the reservation often find themselves in situations where they can't find jobs. More so in the past than present. Even today there are those who prefer not to embrace the white mans way. Given a choice I prefer to live the "people" way. As I child I lived in three worlds and spoke the languages of all. English was the last language of the three I learned.

          I spent time on a reservation as a guest, one of my tribes is mostly in the Midwest now and the other has been integrated into society. My early life was spent in Southern California. Most of my friends off the reservation in the early years were both legal and illegal immigrants from South of the United States border. My mother at this time learned the way she would make her living. She did this by learning the different dialects of Spanish spoken by those south of the United States border. In the end she was able to read, write, and translate 37 of them.

          In my late teens when my half brothers were struggling to integrate, my background which was different from their's, made it easier. My father was part of my life, where for my half brothers this was not so. My father was a college graduate. His diploma said he was a teacher. In reality he was an entrepreneur. After spending one year teaching he finished learning the trade which had paid his way through college and went on to become a business owner.

          In the past fifty years I have seen "people" who have become lawyers, business people, and politicians. For years also I knew others who would never try to integrate. They had no desire to be like those who "had stolen" everything that made them "the people".

      3. mom101 profile image59
        mom101posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        lobobrandon,

        I am glad you don't judge anyone.

        For about 3 years I ran a deli that was inside a c-store which was owned by an Indian family. (from India).

        They treated me ok, but they trusted no one. The customers that came into their store, they called stupid and openly accused many of stealing in their store. Physically restraining some.
        You must be from a different part of India.

  5. Healthy Pursuits profile image86
    Healthy Pursuitsposted 5 years ago

    There are so many tribes and so many individuals in those tribes...which stereotype are you addressing?

  6. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago

    We (I'm 3/8+ Mohawk) like to be called "The People" or a specific translation of the native name. For instance, I'd be called 'person of the flint.' However, other nations or tribes called Mohawks 'snakes' and 'man eaters.' But, the group of Indigenous peoples in my city call themselves "Native American Indians."  Just call me 'Peep.'

    1. kerryg profile image85
      kerrygposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      In my experience, it's the same with the tribes in this part of the country, but lobobrandon doesn't seem like he's American, so I didn't want to get too complicated. smile

      1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
        Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Peep! smile

        I sound like one of those marshmallow treats.

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image88
          Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          lol

  7. profile image0
    Justsilvieposted 5 years ago

    Indian in any form when referring to a Native American is wrong. It is a name given to a whole race of people because one white man was lost. smile

    1. profile image0
      klarawieckposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Oh, you mean like "hispanics"?

      1. profile image0
        Justsilvieposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Exactly! smile

  8. prettydarkhorse profile image63
    prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago

    as long as they are asking for assistance or help, it is nice to help others.

    Can I ask some things here?

    Where are they located? Are they scattered geographically all over the US? Does the gov't even have a distinction for them like in Census, in terms of ethnicity????
    Do they have issues at all, like land - culture etc?
    They are also covered with the same laws, isn't it???

    1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      There are literally 1000s of groups around USA and Canada - tribes or nations, bands, communities, and several other designations. Check the Census (Indians and Native Alaskans and Pacific Islanders are separate designations at least) or US Dept. of the Interior or Bureau of Indian Affairs for reservation locations and addresses. My Hubs don't have them all.

      Some groups are federally recognized, some only at the state/provincial level, some not at all by nation/state/province/local governments. Reservations have their own federal-type governments in US - that's why smoking is allowed in native casinos.

      "Red Indian" is a designation I found in literature and history of the late 1800s. That term passed away from frequent use - like "Black, African American, etc." have changed in use.

      1. prettydarkhorse profile image63
        prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks Ms Patty.

        I am fascinated with the diff group of people which was put in the periphery bec of expansionism. Once the new group of invaders/colonizers arrived, they are relegated in the sideline thus their culture become less dominant comparing to the mainstream culture. The laws at times don't cover them in some instances. Once they own the place and they become transient to that place, and are  minority as time goes by.

  9. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago

    The First Nations natives in Canada are enjoying a resurgence and equal partnerships in government and business, especially in Vancouver BC area and the Six Nations area of Ontario. USA groups are slower to progress, but the Oil Fields on reservations in North Dakota and among native peoples of Ohio are creating a lot of wealth.

    Navajo Nation in the American Southwest probably is more poverty-stricken than most and the North Slope peoples of Alaska need help.

    1. prettydarkhorse profile image63
      prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      thanks for the information, is their econ condition a product of their failure to assimilate in the mainstream culture??

    2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
      Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      "the Oil Fields on reservations in North Dakota and among native peoples of Ohio are creating a lot of wealth."

      Don't say that too loudly, or it's only a matter of time before our government breaks the treaty and takes that land away, too. sad

  10. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago

    prettydarkhorse -- Assimilation? Maybe for some - Many of the Mohawk, like my few past relatives, Oneida, and Seneca married into British families when England came to America and they began running businesses. Unfortunately, some of them owned Black slaves as well for a time. But the Indian Removal Act under Pres. Andrew Jackson forced natives and blacks living with them  westward, not allowing them more time to assimilate --- It was cruel, like running the Scots and Irish out of UK during the manufactured Potato Famine where UK shipped potatoes for sale elsewhere, while locals starved. NOW, descendants of the Cherokee that were forced out and who took blacks with them have expelled the descendants of the blacks. On and on it all goes.

    Some Northeastern natives have been paler than others and can mix with whites easier, maybe, and I read in an old textbook that "red" came from one tribal group skinning some members of another during a battle (blood). I don't know.

    Some groups still call themselves Indians and even incorporated their groups legally with Tribe in the name today. Search Google for American Indian Tribes and Native American Nations and you will find groups that might need help.

    1. prettydarkhorse profile image63
      prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      thanks for the information Patty, it is very rich info.

      I should have said them trying to adapt to the prevailing system like mainstream economic system that they can uplift themselves to poverty (like the Navajo Nation in the American Southwest) or they are comfortable with their own way of doing things.

    2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
      Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      "It was cruel, like running the Scots and Irish out of UK during the manufactured Potato Famine where UK shipped potatoes for sale elsewhere, while locals starved."
      A very apt comparison.

      "NOW, descendants of the Cherokee that were forced out and who took blacks with them have expelled the descendants of the blacks. "
      Well, that's disappointing. sad

      " I read in an old textbook that "red" came from one tribal group skinning some members of another during a battle (blood). I don't know. "

      Huh. I'd never heard that. I was under the impression that the "red" thing was because of some groups' extensive use of red/vermillion "war paint." I could be wrong about that, too.

  11. mikelong profile image75
    mikelongposted 5 years ago

    I see a lot of referencing to Native Peoples of the now United States and Canada (of which I share ancestry), however we turn a blind eye to the majority Native populations of Mexico, Central, and South America....  In places like Chiapas and Oaxaca (among many others), Natives are still being removed from their lands and forced to convert their language and cultural styles to the "Spanish"/European colonizer "norms"......

    Many talk about "those Mexican (or "Hispanic) illegal aliens" who head north, but a huge proponderance of them are displaced Native Americans....  Oil companies and abusive/corrupted European dominated governments are still up to their old games....but we then turn and blame the victims...lumping them into the same national categories as the aggressors....  Severely flawed thinking, at best...

    1. cclitgirl profile image96
      cclitgirlposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      A person could write volumes and volumes of work relating to the Native peoples of the Americas.  I, for one, am part Native American, though to a smaller degree.  But, yes, Mexico has done similar things to its native peoples as have the US and Canada.  But, Mexico's history is quite different.  They were colonized by the Spanish, the French had a hand in their history, and then they lost half their land to the US in the Treaty of Hidalgo.  So, this leads to another topic: Spanish speakers in the US.  It makes me crazy that people say "speak English" when the US doesn't have an official language.  My ancestors lived in Mexico one day and then the next it was part of the US.  They still speak Spanish, Spanglish, and some speak English, but not all.  Some speak Navajo, others speak Nahuatl - the Aztec language that comes from Mexico.  There are hundreds of languages still spoken today by so many different people. 
      That's it: my anthropology and Spanish background is going to show up in my hubs.  I find that is one such awesome thing about HubPages: it gives you an opportunity to teach people.  Look out, friends.  Hubs relating to Spanish, Anthropology and Native Americans are forthcoming!

    2. Jeff Berndt profile image88
      Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I just read an article in National Geographic about the reindeer herders in northern Norway who are/were forced to give up their language and become "Norwegianized." And the Romany people of Europe (often called "Gypsies") have been persecuted for centuries.
      I guess settled, citified people have a  suspicion of folks who view the world differently?

      Interestingly, with the globalization of the world economy, I can see a future where the nation-state becomes more or less obsolete, and people start organizing themselves along tribal lines based on shared values and not shared homelands.

      I could be nuts, though, so... smile

  12. Onusonus profile image87
    Onusonusposted 5 years ago

    As a one sixteenth Native American, I can say with the utmost assurity that I need zero help from the white man. Further I find it to be an insult that people would assume that because of my ethnic background I am somehow inferior to them and therefore can not survive or attain happiness without their assistance.

    1. wheelinallover profile image82
      wheelinalloverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It has not been that many years as these things go that just having a slightly darker hue to a persons skin and the wrong eye color could get a person sent to a concentration camp. This was both in the United States and Germany. Not just those things but a wrong name could get a person interred also.

      I think it ironic that it was the first American "people" who saved the US bacon during that war. The Navajo language was the only unbreakable code ever used in the war. Even at the time of the war the indigenous people understood they would be better off under "those who had lied and stolen" than who would could come. They actually volunteered to serve in this capacity and many others.

  13. tylermj23 profile image80
    tylermj23posted 5 years ago

    I am very pleased and surprised with all the responses to my original forum post.  Thanks for everyone's varied inputs.  I really appreciate all the different perspectives on these issues.

  14. crazyhorsesghost profile image75
    crazyhorsesghostposted 5 years ago

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/5915475_f248.jpg

    I am a Lakota Sioux and I love America but I have some very mixed feelings for people like Christopher Columbus and the habit of celebrating Columbus Day. Good old Christopher didn't discover anything. We were not lost. I for one will never celebrate Columbus Day.


    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/5915448_f248.jpg




    George Armstrong Custer was a idiot. He got his men killed. That is what happened.

    I fought for this country but I would have refused if I knew what I know now. I am a political activist, a member of A.I.M., and I work with feeding and sheltering the poor and the homeless here in the USA. I work in several American cities and I see what is done to the poor of America everyday.

    Let me ask you a very important question. Have you ever been to an American Indian Reservation. It is like visiting a third world country.Yes Native American People are owed much but we don't want more of the double talk that we were given for the last few hundred years. Most of the current American politicians are talking out of their A**. If you know what I mean. We should declare war on the Democrats and the Republicans.

    The American Government should have to pay for what they did to the Native American people. I am in case any one wonders a radical American Indian and a former Catholic Priest. Many of you may not know but yes I am that Thomas Byers. I threw my medals over the White House fence and I resolved to never forgive but I have come full circle and I am now at peace with who I am and what I am. I try every day to make a difference here in America. I see the current Republicans and Democrats as enemies of the American people. Why everyone doesn't see it this way is amazing to me. I can see the Republicans and the Democrats for what they really are. They spin their little stories and give answers spun to take peoples minds off real issues. We should put them on a reservation.


    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/5915457_f248.jpg
    Food From Dumpsters That We Use To Feed Hungry People

    I think it is really sad what was done to the Native American People. But no one really cares. I will never forget. Just like I will never forget both times that Wounded Knee happened. And at the same time I will never forget those planes flying into those buildings on September 11th 2001.




    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/5915481_f248.jpg
    Never Forget Our Fellow Americans That Died That Day.

    We owe those men, women, and children a debt we can never repay. We should have dropped nuclear weapons on those countries or on any country that would dare attack America.


    I will never forgive those people for what they did. That day I was American and filled with rage. I see hungry children and I don't care what race they are or where they come from. I care that they are hungry. I see companies like Wal-Mart that lock their dumpsters and try to keep us from taking good food from them to feed hungry people as criminals. Incidentally I will raid Wal-Marts Dumpsters to feed hungry people but I will never buy anything in their stores. What happened with " Made In America " or " Crafted With Pride In The U.S.A. ". We should try those who created NAFTA with treason against the American people.   

    Everyday crimes are being committed against the American People by Republicans and Democrats. Why would you even consider electing people like Newt or Obama. Both should be put out of the American Government. We need people in the American Government who are for the American People and America.

    Not one dime should be spent outside this country until the problems here are corrected. Not one dime.

    I am proud to be a Native American but I am also proud to be an American. I am just not proud of what America has become. The American Dream is dead. And we let Democrats and Republicans lead us around by the nose and put us into the situation we are in.

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/5915445_f248.jpg
    Stand Up For Yourself As An American. Demand Your Rights As An American

    1. Pearldiver profile image87
      Pearldiverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      +++ + 1010  smile

      1. wyanjen profile image86
        wyanjenposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        that is a great post!

    2. cclitgirl profile image96
      cclitgirlposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      crazyhorseghost: turn that into a HUB!  smile *cheers*

      1. Colleenmt profile image67
        Colleenmtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I agree!

    3. profile image0
      klarawieckposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I LOVE YOU!!! I REALLY DO!!!
      Thanks for that! You're 100% right on everything you said.
      I'm a teacher and I refuse to celebrate Columbus day. It's stupid! The equivalent of celebrating Hitler's Day. No joke. And whenever I have to explain it I say it's the day that Europe discovered that the continent (America) existed.
      I have many NA friends that I love to death. And I've seen the poverty in the reservations, as well as the problem with addiction which is destroying so many NA tribe cultures. Casinos are not the way, that's for sure. It's really sad and we all know how it started. Now it's just a matter of finding out how to end it.
      I say: Power to the people! AIM needs to go back in time to the 1960's! They need to let Leonard Peltier go free, and Robbie Robertson needs to make a new NA inspired album!

  15. adomcruze profile image60
    adomcruzeposted 5 years ago

    No Idea ! smile

  16. Express10 profile image87
    Express10posted 5 years ago

    There are some Indians who wish to have assistance and there are Indians who do not. Contrary to popular belief there are a few Indians who are thriving WITHOUT casinos and without gov't assistance.

 
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