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jump to last post 1-16 of 16 discussions (57 posts)

Do women get a harder time in politics than men? If so, why?

  1. Ella Quirk profile image73
    Ella Quirkposted 6 years ago

    Do women get a harder time in politics than men? If so, why?

  2. msorensson profile image71
    msorenssonposted 6 years ago

    Yes, actually, I think so. They have to prove themselves much much better than the male counterparts. I think this is true not only in politics but in any male dominated field.  Men are perceived to be more decisive and tenacious...a perception, no more.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Right!

  3. ArtzGirl profile image78
    ArtzGirlposted 6 years ago

    Unfortunately, yes-- I feel that women get a pretty hard rap in politics.  This is really unfortunate.   There are so many gifted women who would be great in political office.  Hopefully, this will change over time... but it appears to be this way now.

    The sooner this can change, the better off our planet will be.  It would be great to see women in more of a position of authority.  I feel that a number of them would have more empathy and compassion when it comes to these extraneous wars that we are now fighting.

    I'd really like for this to change.  We need strong women in our key positions.  This could really make all of the difference in the world!

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      When a strong woman holds office she tends to consider the well-being of the country and the family in her decisions:)

  4. tomjoseonline profile image65
    tomjoseonlineposted 6 years ago

    I don't think so. There were many women leaders and in present we can find many successful women in our society.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Around 10% in business and politics and as MDs or CEOs count as many? Or is it that that is enough?

    2. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Compared to what Zero centuries and decades ago? What are you after 25%, 50%, 100%? When will it finally be "equal" enough for women to think that all of a sudden this is no disparity between men and women and "equality" has been reached?

    3. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The numbers are only a representation of inequality. Equality is about justice and equal Human Rights: recognition of personhood.

    4. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Which are covered by what are known as Individual Rights. Individual Rights and "Human Rights" equal the same thing. Person hood and being human resides with in the individual, not the group.

    5. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Keith:) We kind of heard these kinds of arguments presented in these ways as justifications for Apartheid and oppression and innocence thereof. They were declared Crimes against Humanity & are central to the oppression of women.Societal groups ex

    6. tomjoseonline profile image65
      tomjoseonlineposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I am happy to see that a valuable question drawn huge and positive discussion across the board.

    7. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Hi tomjoseonline:)It is about the legal systems and the social constructs in which the individual has to perform hey:)

  5. ibbarkingmad profile image82
    ibbarkingmadposted 6 years ago

    Yes and no. Yes in that they often have to prove themselve when compared to men. What is more, Conservative and Liberitarian women politicians get much more crap than Liberal women politicians. While I am not a fan of Sarah Palin's treatment by the media since she came to the national stage has been grose and nasty. Such behavior towards any woman is uncalled for. If such mocking were to be targetted at Hillary Clinton or Nacy Pelosi would be shouted down as sexist and stupid. If a woman holds public office and also raises a family more power to her I say. Again, I don't agree with  Palin's politics, but treating any woman like that is wrong.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      smile I can't and don't want to comment on American specifics but I voted you up for the differentiations that you made about the manner in which women are targeted. We do not have to support an ideology to recognize ABILITY:) and to be decent to others

  6. flikabing profile image64
    flikabingposted 6 years ago

    Maybe because the responsibilities at home affects them...

    1. swordsbane profile image60
      swordsbaneposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Their "responsibilities at home"?  Seriously?

    2. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Who all live in the home? Should all that live there not be sharing those responsibilities? Should she not sometimes be relieved of hers to give her breathing space and a chance for greater personal fulfillment?

  7. Anjili profile image82
    Anjiliposted 6 years ago

    Somebody quiped that "A woman's worst enemy is a fellow woman". They further added that they are more likely to vote for a male candidate instead of a fellow woman. I think we need to verify this through research. Can women provide a straight answer to this? And yet I have seen many powerful women doing a lot of good in politics. The late Golda Meir was a favorite.

    1. American_Choices profile image79
      American_Choicesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This is a very wise statement and one that we must teach our children.

    2. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It is true but it is about social conditioning through Gender Power Relations and it is up to women in partnership with supportive men to bring change. This is why we need women's groups and safe spaces where women can discuss issues and grow.

  8. profile image60
    Jayesefposted 6 years ago

    Women are nice people, and politics is not meant for nice people. So naturally women face hard times in politics.

    1. swordsbane profile image60
      swordsbaneposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Women are nice people?  Who have you been hanging around?  Women can be just as mean, cruel, criminal, cheating, and irresponsible as men.  Perfect political material.

    2. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This is the expression of a sexist social expectation of women to be 'nice people'? To not rock the boat? They will you know, in the end they will and dump you out:)

  9. Tusitala Tom profile image67
    Tusitala Tomposted 6 years ago

    What I have noticed is that those who criticise women in politics are more predisposed towards insulting them on their appearance.   It is rare for a male politician to be picked up because of his haircut, his suit, or the color of his necktie.   On the other hand, women are rubbished so often by being told they're not dressed in the right garb.   'How unfitting the occassion!"  "She should know better than to dress like that!" et cetera.

        This shoud be regarded as quite unimportant as far as their performance in their job is concerned.   It isn't.   The woman lampooned because of her dress sense is hurt by such mockery - as would be men.  But for some reason, it's the 'fairer sex' which cops the flack.

        Certainly it takes a strong-willed and assertive woman to last in politics.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Just to say I voted you up:) Now I want to go have a bath and wash & colour my hair for a breakfast tomorrow with all my brothers for Mother's day and all our birthdays.  A girl must look fresh & attractive hey:)

  10. H P Roychoudhury profile image49
    H P Roychoudhuryposted 6 years ago

    I don't think so. It all depends upon the personality and the person.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Social structures for political and economic power are stacked against women. This is historic and not deliberately done by men today. Men must learn to recognize those constructs and to change them.

    2. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Catherine the Great, Queen Elizabeth the I, Cleopatra. So, Hell the current monarch or England is a Queen. Once more you keep on going on and on about how men are trying to keep a "woman down" in the modernized world this isn't the case. Juststopit!

    3. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Keith Engel: are you saying that everything that women worked for in South Africa and achieved is rubbish? Our national constitution is irrelevant? The most advanced constitution and charter of Human Rights in the world is of no account? Really?

  11. American_Choices profile image79
    American_Choicesposted 6 years ago

    I believe the world would be a better place if we were always neutral. Appreciating the talents of women both domestically and in the work place has literally changed the world. The next frontier in my humble opinion, is for women to take a more central role in world politics.

    A number of great women who have made a global impact have been mentioned here but I believe the best is yet to come. New talents will surface as we continue to refine the use of the internet for better global communications.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Neutral, as far as it goes, is linked with equal human rights for men and women.Some can't seem to see that:) We build on each others' lives.We hope that the next generation will be stronger, do better, go further; save the world and the human race:)

    2. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Neutrality is only possible once the group identity is eliminated and people truly think of themselves as individuals. Equality as a concept is actually unobtainable because there will always be differences among individuals that make them unequal.

    3. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Intention goes a long way:as I said 'as far as it goes'. Equality and equity are what you make of it as the person in the stronger position, as a group with more power. If you deny that power then you are unable to drive societal change.

  12. silverstararrow profile image81
    silverstararrowposted 6 years ago

    The fact that a question can be framed based on the hardships faced by women in politics as opposed to their male counterparts reiterates the fact that there is, in fact, a struggle underway. However, this is not always the case and it varies from culture to country depending on the way the society treats its women. A nation that suppresses women, and grants them bare minimum rights, does indeed become a tough stage for any woman to prove herself.

    Politics is the elite platform that carves the path of a country's economic and related development. Should a woman undertake this task, she should be willing to stand up to the hypocrisy and levelheaded strategic outttakes her peers/ opponents may indulge in. A woman, not used such scenarios on a daily basis, may have to work harder at the beginning. Then again, like any field, politics is just another venue open for women. They'll learn the ropes as they've done for ages in so many other areas.

    With a team that could support her ventures, work without discriminating her gender and treat her like any other (male) politician, a woman can be just another political head as her male counterpart.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      To find that trusted team hey:)

  13. Keith Engel profile image75
    Keith Engelposted 6 years ago

    My favorite Poet, Berton Braley sums this matter up for me in his Poem "Just Because". Of particular note this poem was written in  the1920s

    Because she's a girl--and a girl of today,
    She wants to go forward, brisk, confident, gay,
    To taste of adventure
    To strive and achieve,
    Though Grundies may censure
    And faint-hearts may grieve,
    She isn't afraid of the world's busy whirl,
    Nor daunted at all just because she's a girl.

    Because she's a girl, need she linger and wait,
    Because such a life was her grandmother's fate?
    She wont--she'll endeavor
    To win her own chance,
    Success, or the ever
    Bright goal of romance,
    But still, from her toes to each water-waved curl,
    She'll keep all her charm, just because she's a girl.

    Because she's a girl, we are boosting her game.
    Here's luck to her, love to her, money and fame!
    But as she goes questing
    For visions that thrall,
    And weighing and testing
    The truth of them all,
    May sportmanship guide her through all of the swirl--
    May she ask for no favors "because she's a girl!"

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The little arrow sits in the tail hey, and in the rhythm. A little dance, a jig, with the warning that she is not part of the brotherhood and will not get favours because she is a girl the way men look out for other men:)

    2. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I think with all the commenting you have done and your own answer proves the point of the poem perfectly. Anytime the term "equality" gets used, it is generally used by people seeking favors as an excuse for a perceived injustice.

    3. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      smile It is not perceived that the face of poverty is female across the world; or that women have to queue at welfare for child maintenance while fathers are absent and negligent. It is not a favour to expect equal return for equal work.

    4. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      So now you wish to bring the biological issue into play when it suits your argument? I grew up having one of those negligent and missing fathers, my mother didn't use it a crutch though in raising me and my brother.

    5. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Your mother's struggle and successes excuse all men? And did you not raise me the biological and whatever differences between men and women? Do these differences make one less & the other more human?

    6. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      So all men are then to be blamed for the failure of some? See two can play that game. Also, I didn't state anyplace that differences in biology makes one more or less human. So don't put words in my mouth that were never stated.

    7. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      You are a writer, student and a teacher and yet you only personalize things? This is not about you- it is about the status and struggle of women in a male society and which you  exemplify perfectly! I invite you to study gender and women's status.

  14. jeanihess profile image60
    jeanihessposted 6 years ago

    smile Women get a harder time in politics just like they get a harder time everywhere else. It is about Gender Power Relations and men still holding most of that power. In South Africa when people ask me which party they should vote for, I say that they should explore who they are and what they want. As a woman you might want to vote for a party that actively promote women into leadership and support women once they are there. Sometimes women are in political and other leadership positions as part of a man's team and not as part of building a more equal and just society. It is hard hey, because they too want professional success, want the power and the salary and the benefits and think that the only way is through a man. Women must understand though and men must accept that good gender relations are not about an anti-male position but about equal Human Rights which are still not achieved. We have about 10% of top positions in the world held by women and the rest predominantly by white men. So no, things have not changed and we have far to go:)

    1. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Your fascination with and complex on how white males are "keeping women down" shows your on hypocrisy. Instead of focusing on the "inequality" aspect of "white males" how about focusing on many of the Arab countries were the problem really exists.

    2. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      smile The Arabs still do not run the world:)They are not even in that top ten or so families that do. But why not address your question to the UN? They are the specialist researchers in this matter:)

    3. Keith Engel profile image75
      Keith Engelposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Newsflash not one single group runs the world, not white males, not Arabs, not blacks, nor Asians. Part of the issue you are stuck on is equality of outcome an impossible matter to achieve with out extreme measures taking,equal poverty as a result.

    4. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I should perhaps write an essay and specify western, eastern, African? Poverty wears a woman's face everywhere. why?

      In South Africa we have already sorted out these debates and points and won the day officially and legislatively and have law to pro

    5. ibbarkingmad profile image82
      ibbarkingmadposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      First, thank you for the comment on my post. You mentioned that many women are on the men's team. I think you are right. The issue I have with some forms of feminism is it looks at women as just men with breasts. Psychology & evolution shows that

    6. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      @- ibbarkingmad smile I am not the armchair kind of commenter. I have worked on political teams and in elections and on gender power relations and power struggles. I share what I know with an opinion or two added:)This stuff are all in our constitution!

    7. ibbarkingmad profile image82
      ibbarkingmadposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I figured you weren't. For some reason my whole comment didn't post. To finish the thought. Psychology & evolution shows that men & women are unique. True equality will only be achieve when both can respect the other for who & what they a

    8. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      @ibbarkingmad: Limited space for replies:) Agree- respecting differences, accepting diversity, according human dignity, meeting needs and advance aspirations:)

  15. MickeySr profile image81
    MickeySrposted 6 years ago

    I don't know if they get "harder" treatment than men, but I think attractive conservative women are treated more unreasonably and unfairly than men or other women - I think many liberals genuinely believe that they (liberals) are simply right, that they stand on morally superior ground, that they care more and are smarter, etc . . . this general notion gives them a sense that they're just better and more desirable than conservatives (who are mean and stupid, etc) - when an unattractive woman is conservative many liberals are fine with that, but when a conservative woman is attractive many liberals think there is just something wrong with that, 'we' (the liberals think) are supposed to have all the smart, young, attractive women, 'we're' the ones who are good and right and pretty, etc. I don't know (of course) how widespread that circumstance is, but I'm confident I've rightly perceived it in some folks.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The difficulties that attractive might face were a discussion topic on one of our South African radio stations last week. You can be pretty and sexy but not pretty and clever and good at your job? or something like that?

  16. feenix profile image60
    feenixposted 6 years ago

    Yes, women "get" a harder time in politics -- and so do blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, Asian-Americans, short men, obese individuals, "unattractive people," the disabled, the elderly, bald men, stutterers, and I could go on.

    1. jeanihess profile image60
      jeanihessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      @feenix:In principle you are right but it's still women generally and the women within various groupings that are more disadvantaged."A man's world" "A woman's lot."How long is it that women can own property, sign contracts or be her father's heir?

 
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