Shooting in Texas

Jump to Last Post 1-25 of 25 discussions (187 posts)
  1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
    Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years ago

    My heart goes out to everyone in Texas. 

    This shooting and killing of innocent children is so wrong.
    My heart aches for all of their families & those teachers also.

    Continue prayers for the injured.

    1. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
      Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. But the question is, when we will take action to reduce these mass shootings?

      1. AliciaC profile image91
        AliciaCposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I agree. People should certainly pray if they think it has value. It's essential that we take our own steps to deal with Earth's problems, however, including dealing with the aftermath of this horrible tragedy and preventing it from occurring again (or at least significantly reducing the chance of its reoccurrence).

    2. Sharlee01 profile image89
      Sharlee01posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      These children and their loved ones, and all that helped in this horrific tragedy have my prayers coming their way. It's a time to put all our attention on them and their now sorrow. Brenda, thank you for posting this thread. You in my view have pointed out where we should at on this day just send prayers to all that are grieving. I am with you, what is needed today are prayers and letting these families know we care, we respect their grief. Thank you...

      Those that are grieving need time to have a quiet time to accept what has happened, and get through the sad tasks of putting their children to rest. They need to see the nation grieves with them.   At this point, they don't need the deaths of their children overshadowed by politicians that are talking about gun control, and vying for votes.

    3. k2khan profile image72
      k2khanposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Sad to hear this news.
      Sending bundles of prayers and love❤️

    4. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      The shooting is terrible and Americans has a right to own guns that evolved with their Constitution.                                  But granting a gun license to teens is no longer common sense.                                   A person owning a gun for hunting or self defense is a good idea. Does that translate to killing an innocent human being? No. This is area America has to look into.

    5. Brenda Arledge profile image80
      Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      This post has turned into a discussion on what needs to be done, instead of thoughts and support for those families.

      It's great to put our minds together & I hope someone can find the perfect solution.

      In the meantime....these precious families are hurting.

      Like the family of Irma Garcia (48) ~ one of the teachers who died in this tragedy.

      Her husband Joe Garcia suffered a heart attack two days later.

      Together, the couple had four children: Cristian, 23; Jose, 19; Lyliana, 15; and Alysandra, 12.

      What can we possibly do to help any of these families?

      1. Sharlee01 profile image89
        Sharlee01posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I agree that families and loved ones need space, a quiet time to gather composure and feel the warmth of others' prayers, and support. Just knowing we all care, and realize their loss. It's all about honoring these children and the sorrow their loved ones are going through. Prayers of support do give comfort.

        1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
          Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Thanks Sharlee...
          I agree these families need time to grieve.   Time to know we are there supporting them.

          We can't change laws overnight...but we can show our compassion.

          1. Sharlee01 profile image89
            Sharlee01posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Many have lost the ability to understand that in times such as this people need time to grieve. They are caught up with the emotion that something needs to be done. It shocks me that more don't realize we have been going around and around for many years, getting nowhere. So, in my view, we have time to do all the blaming and offer solutions in the days to come, not a few hours after this tragedy occurred.

            I appreciated your thread's sentiment.

            1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
              Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              Thank you.  My sentiments exactly.

              My heart goes out to everyone who is touched by this heartbreaking tragedy.

              Please know there are people here for you.

      2. Valeant profile image84
        Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I hope those that pray ask forgiveness if they elect people that ignore the problem.  That there is heartache caused by the guilt of supporting those that choose guns over the lives of children.

        The best thing we can do for these families is enact a change so they can know that they were the last families this will ever happen to.

      3. Miebakagh57 profile image66
        Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Brenda, I can understand the cause of  Joe's heart attack. He loves Irma to the core of his being.                                Again, with four dependent children, it would be harder for him to raise them alone. Let's continue to pump prayers for the family to God.                               During the Obama years it happen age limit to own a gun was raise to 18-23. But it did not solve the problem. Why not make it 40 years upward, and if that fail, raise it to 50 up?                                     Critically, this is the wyrk of law makers. So pressure must be brought to make them have restless days and nights.

        1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
          Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I can understand him having a heart attack...it is just too much to handles losing the love of your life in this manner.
          But now those pour children have nonpatents & the youngest is 11.

          We need to think about these families first.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            'We need to think about these families first'.                                 Brenda, then, what should we do? Thank you.

            1. Sharlee01 profile image89
              Sharlee01posted 2 years agoin reply to this

              So well said...

              1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                You're welcome.

            2. Brenda Arledge profile image80
              Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              I honestly don’t know what we can do to help.

              There are lists for monetary donations, blood donations and legal assistance which I will post a few of them.
              There are several listed on the internet.

              But I was thinking more along the lines of a simple card EXPRESSING our compassion.

              Robb Elementary School
              715 Old Carrizo Road
              Uvalde Texas 78801
              Or
              CITY OF Uvalde, Texas
              101 E. Main Street, Uvalde, Texas 78801
              P.O. Box 799, Uvalde, Texas 78802

              If anyone has any ideas, please share.

              Monetary donations
              Crowdfunding platform GoFundMe set up a page with verified fundraisers put together by family members of shooting victims and nonprofit organizations.
              The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District created a bank account at First State Bank of Uvalde where people can send funds directly to shooting victims and their families. Funds can be sent electronically through Zelle using the email robbschoolmemorialfund@gmail.com or through the mail at the address 200 East Nopal St., Uvalde, Texas 78801. Make checks payable to the “Robb School Memorial Fund.”



              The City of Uvalde set up a separate fund to which people can mail checks payable to the “Robb School Memorial Fund” to P.O. Box 799, Uvalde, Texas 78802.

              Blood donations
              The South Texas Blood and Tissue Center and University Health San Antonio are asking for blood donations to help supplement survivors of the shooting. People can schedule an appointment with the center here or with University Health here.

              1. AliciaC profile image91
                AliciaCposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                These are excellent suggestions, Brenda! I've seen posts on the forum saying that we should help people in Uvalde and have thought to myself that though the posts are kind they are also useless without more specific information. You have given the information that's needed.

                1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
                  Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  Thank you...I think any kind gesture would be appreciated.

              2. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                Brenda, thank you for all these information.                                          I pray many good samaritans in Texas  respond according to their ability.                                                  I add my prayers of intercession for the sorrowing victim family. Thanks again.

  2. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 2 years ago

    Previous prayers don't seem to have had much effect, unfortunately.

    1. hclpd profile image93
      hclpdposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      They never do. If prayers worked, the world would have been a much better place.

  3. Misbah786 profile image85
    Misbah786posted 2 years ago

    Violence in any shape or form is violence. Humanity and love should reign. I'm sending many prayers. May God keep everyone safe and secure. Ameen!
    May the globe shine with the light of peace; that is all we need to illuminate this planet.

  4. hclpd profile image93
    hclpdposted 2 years ago

    It's becoming all too common now. Why is it so easy for anyone to get a gun in the US?

    1. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
      Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Because the NRA lines the pockets of politicians

      1. hclpd profile image93
        hclpdposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I don't want to get into the politics of it all, but Republicans have so far failed to convince me on this pressing matter.

        1. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
          Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Republicans answer to school shootings is to arm teachers. They don't trust us enough to teach a history curriculum but they want to put guns on our hips?

          1. hclpd profile image93
            hclpdposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks God we don't have those types of politicians here. It would be chaos all around.

            The irony is that the US has the audacity to lecture others  about human rights violations after all these atrocities.

            This is just sheer horror.

      2. Readmikenow profile image94
        Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        The only connection the NRA has to any mass shooting is in the delusional thinking of those on the left.

        Gun control? Look at the places that have the strictest gun control measures and you will find the highest rate of gun violence.  Chicago, New York, California, etc.  You can't legislate away mental illness.

        How many members of the NRA have been involved in mass shootings? I think the number stands at zero.

        Some old leftist drill.  Get emotional about things that are proven to not work by claiming they do work and then punishing responsible gun owners. 

        Idiotic emotional responses does not solve problems, it only makes things worse.

        1. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
          Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          There is no reason for an 18 year old to be able to buy an assault rifle and high capacity magazines without a background check or permit. 

          You need to make your comparisons, not state by state but our country against others.

          The US has much more firearm violence than its developed peers.
          One reason for this difference is the abundance of guns in America. According to a 2007 survey, the US led the world in the number of civilian-owned firearms with 88.8 guns per 100 people, while second-place Yemen fell far behind at 54.8 guns per 100 people. And the research, compiled by the Harvard School of Public Health's Injury Control Research Center, has repeatedly found a link between a higher number of guns and higher levels of gun violence.

          We can and need to do better.

          https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics … -uk-canada

          1. Readmikenow profile image94
            Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            "There is no reason for an 18 year old to be able to buy an assault rifle and high capacity magazines without a background check or permit."

            Do you even know what an "assault" rifle is? I've been around guns for decades and nobody can really give a correct answer. I seen 22s with scopes and magazines used to hunt squirrels.  Is that an assault rifle?

            If he legally purchased a gun in Texas, and according to news reports he did.  This person had to show valid identification, fill out a federal Firearms Transaction Record, also referred to as Form 4473. This form asks some questions about a person's eligibility to own a firearm and a person's identity.  Then a background check is performed on the spot, through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). It ensures a person is eligible to purchase a firearm. Due to federal laws, the individual who is purchasing the firearm must be present.

            ALSO,

            Age should matter.  If the United States was attacked you would see 18-year-old firing guns, even 50 mm guns.  They operate some of the most lethal weapons on the planet.

            We don't have a gun problem as much as we have a mental health problem.  A lousy parenting problem and more.

            There was a time when mass shootings didn't occur in the United States.  Why was that?

            1. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
              Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              From the family of the creator of the AR-15:

              Our father, Eugene Stoner, designed the AR-15 and subsequent M-16 as a military weapon to give our soldiers an advantage over the AK-47,” the Stoner family told NBC News late Wednesday. "He died long before any mass shootings occurred. But, we do think he would have been horrified and sickened as anyone, if not more by these events."

              The ex-Marine and "avid sportsman, hunter and skeet shooter" never used his invention for sport. He also never kept it around the house for personal defense. In fact, he never even owned one.

              This weapon was designed to be a tool of war, never intended for civilians.

              And as far as mental health goes, I'll be waiting to see Republicans put the money where their mouth is. They are the first to oppose any spending in this area.  Governor Abbott of Texas actually slashed their mental health funding in that state just last month.

              1. Readmikenow profile image94
                Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                "AR-15 and subsequent M-16 as a military weapon to give our soldiers an advantage over the AK-47"

                Those are automatic weapons and are illegal for anyone to possess.  Do you know of any legal weapons you would consider an "Assault" weapon?

                There was a time when we did not have mass shootings and there was more gun ownership than there is today.

                I wonder what changed? I'd say certain elements of society.

                1. Valeant profile image84
                  Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  The AR-15 is illegal to possess?  Odd statement.

                  https://hubstatic.com/16013124.jpg

                  Second, why do you accept that your Second Amendment rights should be severely restricted on planes?  Why is that scenario perfectly acceptable to you?  What's the difference?

                  Third, so many of these mass shooters are using body armor.  Why not limit that to law enforcement, the military, and the knights of the round table only?

                  Fourth, if it's not the gun, it's can't be the bomb or the nuke.  So why are we trying to keep nukes away from certain countries?  Are members of the GOP claiming that certain leaders of other countries are mentally ill?  How do they know?  Why do we regulate and track bomb making materials very strictly?  Why the double standard?

                  1. Readmikenow profile image94
                    Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    Interesting meme but most mass shooters use handguns.

                    I don't like the exception on planes but it's not worth the fight to change it

                    So, you are going to tell private citizens who live in dangerous areas they are not permitted to buy body armor for personal protection because they're used by mass shooters?

                    Actually, like the gun, the bomb or the nuke can't hurt anyone without people involved.  Left alone, they hurt nobody.

                2. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                  Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  'I wonder what changed. I'd say certain elements of society.'                                            I would love to wonder too. Please do dig some more and tell us. thanks.

            2. Credence2 profile image78
              Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

              "There is no reason for an 18 year old to be able to buy an assault rifle and high capacity magazines without a background check or permit."

              Do you even know what an "assault" rifle is? I've been around guns for decades and nobody can really give a correct answer. I seen 22s with scopes and magazines used to hunt squirrels.  Is that an assault rifle?

              If he legally purchased a gun in Texas, and according to news reports he did.  This person had to show valid identification, fill out a federal Firearms Transaction Record, also referred to as Form 4473. This form asks some questions about a person's eligibility to own a firearm and a person's identity.  Then a background check is performed on the spot, through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). It ensures a person is eligible to purchase a firearm. Due to federal laws, the individual who is purchasing the firearm must be present

              Ok, Mike, so who dropped the ball? How did this obviously troubled youth manage to legally acquire a weapon so quickly and easily?

              I think that a reasonable waiting period of time would help.

              1. Readmikenow profile image94
                Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                I think those who saw his Facebook post stating that he was going to shoot up a school and did nothing might bear some responsibility.

                "Abbott said the gunman wrote about his intentions on Facebook. A spokesman for Meta, Facebook’s parent company, said the gunman’s private one-to-one messages were discovered after the shooting.

                Abbott said that in the first of three messages, about 30 minutes before the school shooting, Ramos wrote, “I’m going to shoot my grandmother.”

                Shortly after, he wrote, “I shot my grandmother.”

                And finally: “I’m going to shoot an elementary school.”

                He allegedly sent similarly chilling text messages to a girl he met online describing how he had just shot his grandmother and was going to shoot up an elementary school."

                https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/uvald … uxbndlbing

        2. Nathanville profile image89
          Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          You say “Gun control? Look at the places that have the strictest gun control measures and you will find the highest rate of gun violence.”  That sounds illusional to me - Look at the rest of the world where gun control measures are much stricter than in the USA, and the rate of gun violence in those countries (the rest of the world outside of the USA) is far, far lower than in the USA.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Arthur, friend, welcome to the discussion. Where have you been to? I try emailing you two days ago, but my gmail is out of reach. Thanks.

            1. Nathanville profile image89
              Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              Hi Miebakagh, we've been on a week's holiday in Durham, north England.

              1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                Welcome to home. Stay safe with the family.

          2. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Quite true.  Now look at the number of guns in various countries and compare their homicide rates.  No correlation between the two.  The conclusion is that it isn't guns that is the problem; it is the people.  For whatever reason the people of the US are prone to violence more than those of other nations.  This is rather simple logic; correlation does not equal causation. 

            Of course, if the goal is to prevent bodies with bullet holes, rather than bodies in general, you are correct; take away the guns and no more bodies with bullet holes.  At least from law abiding people as only criminals (and murderers) will have guns to produce those bullet holes with.

            1. Nathanville profile image89
              Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              No, there is no direct correlation if you try to make a direct comparison, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a relationship.  The flaws in trying to make a simple comparison between different countries is that other factors will affect the results; nevertheless a simple comparison between the UK (where we don’t have guns) and USA shows the homicide rates in the USA is far higher:-

              •    According to Wikipedia the homicide rate in the USA is 6.3 per 100,000 population, whereas in the UK it’s only 1.2 per 100,000 population.

              •    According to the UN the homicide rate in the USA is 5.3 per 100,000 population, whereas in the UK it’s only 1.2 per 100,000 population.

              Australia is an example of where guns were restricted in 1996; prior to the restrictions homicide rates in Australia ranged between 1.73 & 2.21 per 100,000 population (over a 6 year period); since then the homicide rate in Australia has steadily declined, so that now it’s down to just 0.89 per 100,000 population.

              Although there may not be a direct correlation between the level of guns in circulation in a society and the level of homicides; for people outside of the USA it does stand to reason that there is a relationship and as such the more guns that are freely available the more violence there is going to be.

              As regards your last point “take away the guns and no more bodies with bullet holes.  At least from law abiding people as only criminals (and murderers) will have guns to produce those bullet holes with.”  - That maybe true for the USA but in countries like the UK even criminals and murderers don’t have guns; even the vast majority of police in the UK don’t have guns.

              In Britain (excluding Northern Ireland) there have been a total of just 19 massacres in the last 50 years, with a total fatality of just 512 in 50 years – How does that compare to the USA?

  5. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 2 years ago

    This was an eighteen-year-old! Not old enough to go to a bar and buy a beer but old enough to buy semi-automatic rifles. Something is terribly wrong and all the well-meaning prayers offered afterward are not going to help families that will be tortured by their memories for their entire lives.
    According to the Constitution, an American can own a weapon because a well-regulated militia is (was) necessary. What is well-regulated here? Nothing!

    1. Misbah786 profile image85
      Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      ++++

      Sadly it happens in many parts of the world. Happened twice in Peshawar, Pakistan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Pesh … l_massacre
      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-54701753

      In 2019, a gunman opened fire in a New Zealand mosque at the local time of Friday prayer and livestreamed the slaughter on Facebook. He streamed Live for 17 minutes non-stop.

      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl … ebook.html

      1. hclpd profile image93
        hclpdposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        New Zealand government quickly sprung into action, launching a buy back scheme for guns.

        It will be a lot harder to change anything in the US, however, as the change needs to be made in their constitution.

        1. Misbah786 profile image85
          Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

          +1

  6. Pamela99 profile image86
    Pamela99posted 2 years ago

    The Texas school shooting is horrific. I feel so bad for the parents and the children who lived but are now terrified. We have got to make some changes to keep children safe.

    I am praying for all of the people affected. I can't imagine what happened to that shooter for him to hate people, but he should have been locked up for things he wrote on social media.

  7. janshares profile image93
    jansharesposted 2 years ago

    It's been a rough day, Brenda. I have a range of emotions, already raw from the massacre in my hometown of Buffalo. But to hear of babies and teachers killed took the grief and exhaustion to another level. It was the last straw. I'm glad I was already scheduled to be off this week. I've been processing with other fellow therapists about how to take care of ourselves. As we remember the victims of Texas and Buffalo, let us remember first responders, police officers, hospital staff, counselors, and of course, the little ones who will forever have those images seared into their psyches. Sigh. All I can do is sigh.

    1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
      Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Jan...
      My thoughts are with you & your hometown.
      It's hard to wrap my head around the why...
      There is no explanation.

      I know others automatically go towards gun control, but my thought is that if someone wants to do this...they will anyway.
      Maybe next time it will be a bomb.

      The thinking of people is deranged...we need to being back good old values.

      1. janshares profile image93
        jansharesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Thank you, Brenda.

  8. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
    Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years ago

    The United States outstrips anywhere else in the world in terms of gun ownership, gun-related homicides and public mass shootings. It has 120 firearms per 100 people,  more than twice as many per capita than war-torn Yemen, the next highest country on the list.

    Despite having 4 percent of the world's population, the U.S. made up 31 percent of all public mass shootings globally between 1966 and 2012, according to a 2015 study by Adam Lankford, a professor of criminal justice at the University of Alabama.

    Sadly we are outpacing the world here in America.

    1. hclpd profile image93
      hclpdposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Is it not an act of terror? If it is, we can safely say the the US counts among the top 5 countries affected by terror, just not by the traditional means

  9. Rupert Taylor profile image95
    Rupert Taylorposted 2 years ago

    Numb. Totally numb.

    This is the 362nd time this has happened in the U.S. since January 2000. Let that sink in; 362 school shootings involving injury or death in just over two decades. Each followed by an outpouring of thoughts and prayers.

    If prayers worked it seems these atrocities would have stopped; instead they are increasing in frequency.

    Action is needed. Americans need to turf out politicians who are owned by the gun lobby and install legislators prepared to take on the NRA.

    Every country has people with severe mental health problems and violent, dysfunctional families but the United States is the only one where this kind of carnage happens so frequently. America is the only nation in which assault weapons and other similar lethal firearms are readily available. Think that might be a factor?

    Pray if you wish, but understand that that alone will not change a darned thing.

    1. Jodah profile image90
      Jodahposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I couldn’t agree more, Rupert. My heart goes out to the victims and their families, but something concrete needs to be done to stop this continuing.

    2. Misbah786 profile image85
      Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      +1000000000

      I agree 100%. Even God, I believe, has never asked to simply pray and relax. Along with prayer, action is also required.

      So whoever knows the right thing to do and fails to do it, for him it is sin. James 4:17

      1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
        Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I agree.  What is the right thing???

        1. Misbah786 profile image85
          Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I believe, the right thing to do is to educate people about what is right and what is wrong. We need to learn the difference between the two.  And if someone is guilty, he should not be released under any circumstances; it is critical to reach and cut the roots of trees rather than the branches. smile Just my opinion!

    3. Brenda Arledge profile image80
      Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I do believe in prayer.

      The problem is...there is free will & we can't stop someone from doing these horrible things.

      I agree that purchasing guns should not be so easily done from the internet, but taking away our guns isn't the answer either.

      1. Misbah786 profile image85
        Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I am putting the entire world into question, not just the United States. How many people in the world have legal access to firearms? (Licensed guns) Is there any data?

        1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
          Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          We keep data here in the United States.
          When one legally purchases a gun...you give them all your information...including your driver's license number and copy of it.

          The gun is then registered under your name.

          1. Misbah786 profile image85
            Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, but what about those purchased on the internet? Does the government keep data on online shoppers? I'm curious if they're also available on the dark web in the United States. They are in many parts of the world. That, I believe, must be stopped. As far as I know, governments are unable to control and track the data of the dark web.

            1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
              Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              I'm nit certain how it works on the internet, but there are alot of different sites.
              Most do say you have to pass background check & have waiting days.  Then you actually pick up guns at a local store that sells guns   ~ will hold it there for you.

      2. AliciaC profile image91
        AliciaCposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        It should be much harder to get a gun than it is now in real life. If new requirements are established, as they should be, some guns should be surrendered.

        1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
          Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          The internet allows way too many...but also people can make guns on 3D printers.
          This is scary.

          1. AliciaC profile image91
            AliciaCposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, it is, Brenda.

          2. Misbah786 profile image85
            Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, that's horrible but the only country where 3D printing of firearms is allowed is the United States.
            https://3d-print-times.com/basics-of-3d … -it-legal/

            1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
              Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              Like anything else...it doesn't matter to some if its allowed...it onky matters if they can make a profit.
              Sadly yes...

              1. Misbah786 profile image85
                Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                You can't own a gun so easily here in Spain. This is included in the Spanish constitution under article 149.26 where it is said that the Spanish government has exclusive competence control over production, sale, possession and use of firearms and explosives. The Legislation on the use and ownership of firearms in Spain is probably one of the most restrictive in Europe. It doesn't mean that you cannot own a gun here in Spain but it is quite restrictive.

                It is possible to obtain firearms licence for hunting (shotguns, rifles and assault rifle versions) without too much problem.

                With regards to hand guns, there is a possibility to obtain a licence and purchase but the applicant has to become member of the Spanish federation of olimpic shooting, and pass several tests. The gun cannot be carried around unless on the way to the shooting venue and by law they have to be kept in a safe.

                https://belegal.com/questions/showQuest … -in-Spain-

        2. hclpd profile image93
          hclpdposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Why is it so easy to obtain a gun over there, though? Don't they understand that if a mentally weak/unstable person gets access to these weapons, it will be mayhem?

      3. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
        Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I don't think anyone is calling for guns to be taken away from people. A bill has passed the house almost 2 years ago that calls for universal background checks but cannot get past the Senate.  There's no reason for this other than too many of our politicians are in the pocket of the NRA.

    4. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Rupert, its a pity that this mass shooting is very regular.                                                 On a second note, I submit prayer do works. The thing is that at the moment the guy is about to strike, no one is on their knee praying agaist gun violence. But if America, will pray dai5y or weekjy to God against that happening again, they'll be a respite.

  10. PaulGoodman67 profile image95
    PaulGoodman67posted 2 years ago

    Some form of action is needed to make guns more difficult to access for those likely to cause harm. The massacres are becoming more frequent and more deadly.

    Then there's all the shootings and killings that aren't so largescale. They are so commonplace, they don't even make the news headlines, but kill more people when they're all added up.

    Prayers and comfort in the aftermath is fine, but the main aim should be prevention, to protect the lives of innocent children and others.

  11. Jodah profile image90
    Jodahposted 2 years ago

    It is very similar here in Australia, Misbah.

    1. Misbah786 profile image85
      Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      John, I believe that having such restrictions on the use and ownership of guns is a good thing. smile

      1. DrMark1961 profile image96
        DrMark1961posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        You may feel fine about that in Europe but I do not feel safe with only the police and criminals able to own guns. Where I live (interior of Brazil) it takes hours for the police to respond (unless it is the weekend, but that is okay but they will be sure to come on Monday if the roads are not too bad). If a criminal does show up and decides to rape your wife and children or steal everything you own, you have to take care of yourself.
        If you are too poor to own a way to defend yourself, too bad. Gun control is supported by law enforcement and criminals.

        1. Misbah786 profile image85
          Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

          That's a sad situation, Dr Mark. Thank you for bringing this up. After reading your response, I researched about the Gun control in Brazil. According to the information on internet, a person must be at least 25 years old to own a gun. It is illegal to carry a gun outside a residence and that you must have a gun license, which costs R$88,00 and pay a fee every ten years to renew the gun register. According to Wikipedia there are around 17 million firearms in Brazil, 9 million of which are unregistered. Brazil has the second largest arms industry in the Western Hemisphere. Approximately 80% of the weapons manufactured in Brazil are exported, mostly to neighboring countries; many of these weapons are then smuggled back into Brazil. Please correct me if I am wrong.

          I believe there should be some limitations, such as how many guns a family can own. Or maybe you can use a gun under such circumstances? As we all know, more than half of the world's population, primarily the young generation, is suffering from various psychological problems. Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental illness worldwide. I believe that having such easy access to a death tool at home all the time is also dangerous. People who suffer from depression and anxiety, I believe, are extremely sensitive and can be harmful to both others and themselves.

          The rules for owning a gun in Pakistan (my home country) are similar to those in Spain, but many people own unlicensed firearms. About 5 years ago, my dad's cousin, who was only 39 years old and suffering from depression, shot himself dead with his own gun at home while drunk in front of his wife and two children. This is also a reason why I believe it is dangerous to have easy access to a gun.

          Do you have mobile police stations or security alarm systems in Brazil? We have them in Spain and Pakistan.. smile

          1. DrMark1961 profile image96
            DrMark1961posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            I am not sure who invented that number but it is horribly incorrect, the actual fee is about 100 times that which makes legal gun ownership out of the hands of the working poor.
            It is by no means out of the hands drug dealers and kidnapping gangs.
            In areas like the favelas (slums) it is much worse than I described since if you call for the police they will never show up. The drug dealers do not allow the police to enter their neighborhoods and since they are all armed with submachine guns the police obey their orders.
            There are some mobile police stations in areas of cities like Rio, mainy for US and European tourists. They are not there to help the poor citizens that need access to a means of protection.

            1. Misbah786 profile image85
              Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

              Dr Mark, I'm very sorry to hear that. That is, certainly, a sad scenario. Citizens, in my opinion, should be protected as it is a fundamental human right. The information you provided regarding drug dealers is equally horrifying; it seems like criminals are more powerful than the law and authorities.

  12. profile image0
    Vladimir Karasposted 2 years ago

    There have always been, and always will be those mentally challenged individuals, so there is no legislative cure for that. The most scary part in all that being, that many psychotics are otherwise acting pretty normally, even quite intelligently, all until they snap and do their horrible act.
    It most certainly takes a twisted mind to kill innocent children, there is no political or religious fanaticism behind it.

    1. Misbah786 profile image85
      Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      +1000000000000

  13. Credence2 profile image78
    Credence2posted 2 years ago

    More of the standard rightwing whining and BS, I see.

    The idea of turning all schools and school grounds into armed camps with teachers strapped with pistols and armed guards with assualt weapons, as a typically conservative a solution, is quite inane. If we do it for the schools, we better do it for the post offices, libraries, churches, etc.

    Under such a scenario, there would probably be a greater aggregate of fatalities due to accidents, etc, then all the periodic massacre type assaults combined. The idea that these educators/school teachers will be gunslinging Wyatt Earp types who can prepare themselves instantly against an assailant who has the advantage of surprise and heavy weaponry is a fantasy. The "good gun, bad gun" analogy is just more BS to entertain the feeble minded.

    Then we have the cowards, Abbott and Cruz talking about God and prayers, instead of practical solutions.

    Conservatives in their nervous fears and insecurities feel that everyone want to take their precious guns. Well, it is just a fantasy, as there are more guns in America then people, so such a possibility is remote from any standpoint.

    They talk about containing the mentally ill. Well here is the other part of the fantasy, without background checks it is difficult to identify these people before they can buy a gun. A retrograde state like Texas that make it easier to buy a gun then to buy a chocolate malt, should recognize and comes to terms with this. Thank God, that I wisely decided not to settle there.

    I say, in keeping with the 2nd Amendment, you all can have your guns. But, in compromise with the Left, which will be necessary as we will be harboring a grudge with the Right over this and other issues this fall, background checks and waiting periods should be required. How do you determine a person who wants a weapon to be mentally Sound without one? If you are serious about addressing mental illness as being the solution and you want to go beyond mere mumbo-jumbo, a tangible remedy must be employed.

  14. Valeant profile image84
    Valeantposted 2 years ago

    Prayers are great for making those who are doing the praying feel better.  Especially with around 30% of the country unaffiliated to any religion. 

    Some measure of action to prevent this from happening to any other family would likely be a more profound gift.

    1. Readmikenow profile image94
      Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      What would those measures be? Are they something new or something that has been tried before and failed?

      1. Valeant profile image84
        Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        For civilian body armor purchase, yearly mental health check ins by members of the ATF would be a starting spot.  Like Credence noted, no problem owning it, but like guns, we need to identify the whack jobs more often.

        I also believe in age restrictions on gun purchases.  We don't let people drink alcohol or even rent cars until certain ages.  If someone is 18 and really wants that experience, they still have the option to join the military.  Heck, that would be a great recruiting tool for our armed services.  Want the good weapons, come serve.  They get expert, supervised training on how to be responsible gun owners.  Win-win.

        Background checks seem acceptable to the majority of Americans.

        Lastly, prosecute illegal carry laws in major cities.  Get more aggressive with hiring and flood the streets and amp up identification and prosecution.  Send a message like NYC did to make their city more safe pre-2000.  Gun violence is not just a mass shooter issue as the right always points out.

        Start there and see if they make a dent.

        1. Readmikenow profile image94
          Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          "yearly mental health check ins by members of the ATF"

          If only the government could be trusted.  Doing this would be used as a tool to crush political opposition.  The IRS has been used to do this many times.  Who is going to give the members of the ATF yearly mental health checks?

          Yes, 18-year-olds being able to operate some of the deadliest firearms on the planet in the military proves age doesn't matter.  There are many responsible gun owners who are 18 years old.

          There are background checks required to purchase a firearm today.  You ever purchase one?  Living in New York to purchase a gun you must

          Be 21 or older;
          Have a license to carry or own a handgun; and
          Have a background check performed by a licensed firearms dealer.

          So, background checks don't seem to stop anything. 

          "prosecute illegal carry laws in major cities.  Get more aggressive with hiring and flood the streets and amp up identification and prosecution."

          I completely agree with you. I would add that there should be extra effort to enforce the gun laws currently on the books.  Chicago has some very restrictive gun laws, they don't enforce.

          I also wonder how to keep illegal guns out of the hands of criminals.  Guns that are stolen, smuggled into the United States, etc.  Background checks, gun bans, etc.  don't work with people who don't pay attention to the laws.

          1. Valeant profile image84
            Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            My point was that if you choose to own the body armor, make it yearly to have ATF check in with those people to look for mental health red flags.  Like I noted, it's a small change that doesn't impact 2nd Amendment rights because we're talking about the body armor and not the guns.

            And no, being 18 and operating deadly firearms in the military does not prove what you think it proves.  The reason being that those 18 year-olds get massive safety training and are supervised by older, more experienced soldiers for years of operating that weaponry.  Joe Schmo 18-year old bullied computer geek won't have the same level of expertise or respect for a weapon as a trained solider.  Having served, I'm shocked you'd even put those two things on the same level.

            Again, your info is a little off.  You have to be 21 to purchase a license for a handgun, but no license is needed for a shotgun or rifle.  So that age is 18 to buy those weapons.

  15. Brenda Arledge profile image80
    Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years ago

    I believe in the right to own guns and protect yourself and others.
    Even my pastor is a concealed carry gun holder.

    It's sad that life is this way, but each person has a right to defend themselves.

    But there are so many bad loop holes...like when local police go to a home with a warrant for one thing, such as drugs...they cannot investigate another ...even if they actually see a gun they can do nothing because the warrant does not specify that item.

    So we need to untie the hands of law enforcement.   Make it easier for them to stop guns in the wrong hands.

    No reliable gun owner has a problem with waiting periods or background checks.  We'll even take classes if need be.

    1. Valeant profile image84
      Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      All common sense.  Nothing too controversial in there and something for both sides.

    2. AliciaC profile image91
      AliciaCposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with your comment about making it easier to stop guns reaching the wrong hands. Background checks, training, and perhaps rules about what gun types can be bought would be good as well. Perhaps the stage when people don't feel the need for a personal gun will eventually be reached, but it seems that in some areas this is going to take a long time.

      My fear is that no changes will be made to the gun situation and that once the news about the current tragedy has faded, another tragic event will happen.

  16. Peggy W profile image94
    Peggy Wposted 2 years ago

    All I know is that something has to change.  These mass shootings are becoming all too regular. So sad, and also maddening.

  17. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 2 years ago

    Sorry, K2khan but prayers don't seem to be helping much.

    1. Misbah786 profile image85
      Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      We should not put all of the blame on prayers, but I agree that action is also required. Prayers and actions must go hand in hand. smile

      God has never asked us to simply pray and relax. The following Hadith (words of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) ) explains it very well.

      “Whosoever of you sees an evil action, he must change it with his hand.(by force) If he is not able to do so, then (he must change it) with his tongue. (By speech) If he is not able to do so then he must know it is evil within his heart and this is the weakest (manifestation) of faith.”

      [Muslim – Kitab Al-Iman (Book on Faith), hadith 49/78]

      1. AliciaC profile image91
        AliciaCposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I like your first paragraph. I’ve seen similar suggestions from some Christians. First people pray, then they act. The prayer provides spiritual help or psychological support, depending on a person's beliefs, and the person provides the action that’s needed to help the situation.

        1. Misbah786 profile image85
          Misbah786posted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Yes, Linda, perhaps it's because Islam, Christianity, and Judaism are all Abrahamic religions with many similarities, and the word of God is the same in some ways in all of these religions. smile

  18. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 2 years ago

    You are making some good points, Valeant.

    1. Valeant profile image84
      Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, buddy.  Weird how they sound so simple, and then you've got a GOP Senate who won't even allow debate on any changes.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
        Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Sad to note that the Senate will ignore or refuse debate to change gun control.

  19. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 2 years ago

    I really need to know how the second amendment covers this sort of nonsense.

  20. Valeant profile image84
    Valeantposted 2 years ago

    Add this to the hypocritical stance file:

    To those in the general public screaming “Arm the teachers! Give the teachers guns!”…let me get this straight…

    You don’t trust us to teach our content - there are so many bills going to state legislatures undermining the expertise teachers bring to the field. We need to publish a year’s worth of lesson plans because you don’t believe we’re actually teaching, right?

    You don’t trust us when we say your student is the reason they’re failing when they are skipping class, aren’t submitting assignments, are playing both sides of the field and are dropping the ball, but it must be the teacher’s fault, right?

    You don’t trust us to hold your student accountable for their behavior, standing firm on commitments and expectations, because it’s the teacher asking too much, right?

    You don’t trust us to discipline students when they act out or abuse the system, because they’re precious little angels, and we’re the problem, right?

    But you’ll trust us, no…EXPECT us to take a bullet for them when the system - when, at this point, not if - fails them.

    And NOW you’re saying you trust us, trust me, to add firearm safety and defensive firearm training to my plate? You don’t trust me to execute a lesson plan but you’ll trust me to execute an intruder?

    Incredible teachers are leaving the field every day.  Phenomenal  teachers are barely hanging on as they go through our day to day.  Accredited programs and universities all over the country are closing their education programs because no one is enrolling.

    When your kids, or grandkids, nieces, and nephews are being taught by actual undertrained people who are the only option to hire, will that make you happy?  I mean…at least they’ll have guns…right?

    1. Fayetteville Faye profile image61
      Fayetteville Fayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Spot on

  21. Valeant profile image84
    Valeantposted 2 years ago

    And today's funny post on the political hypocrisy in the United States:

    https://www.tiktok.com/@jarretberenstei … _webapp=v1

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      He said it well: "Banning only works when it's something I don't like".  Books or guns, Big gulp or abortion, alcohol or marijuana - it only works when it's something I don't like.

      Unsaid but plain; if it's something I don't like then it should be banned.

      1. Valeant profile image84
        Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        As usual, you missed the point completely.

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Oh I got the point all right.  I just turned the same thought the other direction.

          1. Valeant profile image84
            Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Like I said, you missed it, badly.  Simply about the belief that bans work or don't.  Only one party is flip-flopping like a fish out of water on that belief.

            1. wilderness profile image95
              wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              LOLOLOLOL  Out of all the possible answers to school shootings liberals support just one.  One that they have worked on for decades while watching the death toll rise, one that they now wish to push again.  While we again watch the death toll rise.

              To disarm America.  That's it - ban guns from Americans. 

              Oh well, at least they don't flip flop - they're consistent in their failure.  If it doesn't work do it again, hoping for a different result.  What is the short term for that concept again?

              1. Valeant profile image84
                Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                Solid attempted deflection from the fact that you missed the point of the humor. 

                As to your major falsehood about liberals supporting just one possibility to stop children from dying, that's such a far-fetched lie it's time to move on and deal with posts that deal in reality.

                1. wilderness profile image95
                  wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  Really?  What else have liberals proposed?  Armed guards in schools?  Fortifying schools to whatever is necessary?  Arming teachers? 

                  As far as I have heard not one of those are considered by liberals; all are just beyond comprehension that anyone would even mention such evils, let alone propose we do them.  What about you - what have you heard liberals seriously proposing that does not involve keeping guns away from people?

                  1. Valeant profile image84
                    Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    Do you really not know any of the other proposals currently already in the Senate?

                    It's so hard to have a conversation with you when you are this uninformed on a topic such as this.  Not even worth it.  Go do some research and come back so you have some idea of the other things liberals have put forth.  I'm not your teacher.

                  2. Credence2 profile image78
                    Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    The whole idea is that we need to identify the people that guns are to be kept away from or with good police work identify at risk perpetrators that already have them.

                    There have been plenty of proposals here that did not speak of confiscating guns. They would make sense to any reasonable person except those that expect to buy an AK over the counter at WALGREENS as easily as I buy my toothpaste.

                    I tell you now that teachers by an overwhelming majority do not want to be security guards and it is outside their job description. Fortifying schools as an idea is to be in adjunct to getting control on process of keeping weapons away from those not legally allowed to possess one.

                    In the wake of this carnage, all proposals need to be considered. Just how much more blood need to to be spilt why so many of you remain intractable to any sort of adjustment, saying that none of it will work. You are willing to try all the ideas from the conservatives not knowing if they will work.

                    I can see  1 armed guard in a school, but turning it into a fortress is not going to solve anything but make it more dangerous for everyone.

                    Well, Wilderness, as if you have not noticed, in the face of the recent bloodbaths, sometimes it is necessary to keep guns away from certain people. But asking you to use to see a subtle nuance, it does not mean all the liberals are trying to take your guns away.

  22. Eric Caunca profile image94
    Eric Cauncaposted 2 years ago

    I think it is time for the United States to outlaw firearms in residential areas. Guns do not provide protection; rather, they provide criminals with the ability to utilize them to carry out their terrible intentions. It is my opinion.

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It is your opinion, but is it a well researched one, based on facts, statistics, etc. or just a gut feeling?

      One is useful to make changes, the other useful only for controlling others to satisfy feelings without need for results.

      There is also the small question of just how to remove guns from the hands of those criminals; laws have never succeeded in stopping a determined criminal from doing what they want.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
        Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Wilderness, very well put. You mean once a person is empowed by the law to own a gun, it become hard to take it away by the same law in the USA? I found that very odd.

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Are drugs illegal in the US?  Yes, of course.  Then doesn't that mean that no one has those illegal drugs?  No, of course not; tens of thousands of criminals do.

          Law abiding people will abide by the law and not own a banned gun.  Criminals don't care what the law says and will do as they wish.

          The end result is that you have taken the means of defense from the law abiding people that would never kill anyone and left the criminals that DO kill with their weapons.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Something like that in your last parag applis to Nigeria, my country years ago.                                                On the coming again of democracy, with retired military general Olusegun Obasanjo as president, the police ask every law abiding person owning guns to sorrender their weapons.                                      Critically, it seems those with a criminal bent, don't hand over, or they went to acquire the more deadly. AK-47s! It's then that the police realised that the criminals has better guns than they riffles.                                   The trend still persists especially in the Northern parts of the country, where the Army, is now battlng those out law elements.

          2. Nathanville profile image89
            Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            My experience in the UK is different to Miebakagh’s in Nigeria in that in Britain neither criminals nor police generally carry deadly weapons; so ‘law abiding people’ (who are unarmed) are much safer in our homes and streets.  In fact, to use excessive force to defend yourself in Britain is a criminal offence e.g. shooting an intruder in your home in Britain is likely to end up with you being prosecuted for murder, and the jury is likely to find you guilty.

            1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
              Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

              Ah, the law! Is a mysterious thing.                                  Seems only to protect, the criminals and the unlawful.                                              Ah, those who make the law,         are criminal bent.                                                  The lawful are not even safe in their house, Nor in a Castle, or market shed.                                                   A criminal can walk into a Castle anytime with a hand gun.                                                                       Your life or your money?                                                Making the law an ass hole!

              1. Nathanville profile image89
                Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                Yep the ‘law’; sometimes the law is an ass, but in this respect e.g. that one should use reasonable force only in self-defence, as a Brit, I think (for Britain) the law is right.

                Under British law self-defence and the prevention of crime originates from a number of different sources:-

                •    Defence of the person is governed by the common law.  Common law being unwritten laws (supported by the courts) e.g. traditions and common practices who’s origin is not always known because that’s the way it always has been, accepted traditions that can sometimes date back over a 1,000 years.

                •    Defence of property however, is governed by the Criminal Damage Act 1971.

                •    Arrest and the prevention of crime are governed by the Criminal Law Act 1967.

                One example of a rather bizarre Common Law in England was ‘Market Overt’ (Marché Ouvert) which was common law dating back to medieval times whereby if you bought goods in ‘good faith’ in an open air market in England during the hours of daylight then you would automatically have legal ownership of the goods, even if it later transpired that those goods were stolen!  That law was abolished in English law in 1995, but it still applies in Hong Kong and British Columbia?

                The most famous case of a home owner being found guilty of murder and imprisoned in Britain is that of a farmer who in 1999 using an illegal firearm shot and killed a 16 year old intruder – as outlined in the video below:-

                In bringing the verdict the jury had three options:-

                *  Not Guilty
                *  Man slaughter, or
                *  Murder.

                Obviously it was highly unlikely the jury would find him not guilty, but of the other two choices the jury decided on a majority of 10 to 2 that Tony Martin was guilty of murder.

                Tony Martin Shot Two Burglars Killing One at His Remote Farm Bleak House https://youtu.be/kjMqq8xVkus

                1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                  Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  In Nigeria, if you bought a stolen property, its still yours whether you know it as stollen or not. Even a theif had the right to the stollen items before the law until proven otherwise.                                         But that part of the law that enforce self-defence is as the British system. Nigerians laws and status were framed after the British system. Nigeria, was a former British colony.                                               'Ah the law, is a terrible thing.                                       'With two outstretch arms,                            'knight Sword in one, and a balance in the other.                                               'And eyes scarfed with a thick cloth,                                 'To do justice to him that come with a clean hands?                                                'But found him guilty!'

                2. GA Anderson profile image88
                  GA Andersonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  Burglars caught in the act
                  Birdshot
                  Murder conviction.

                  Well, In only knowing the details, as presented in your link, that's certainly a foreign concept to me: You can keep it.

                  GA

                  1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                    Miebakagh57posted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    GA, then can you tell us how Americans can view it in a Federal or State sense? Or both?                                You even sound a little poetic, come on. GA tell us.

    2. Ken Burgess profile image74
      Ken Burgessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Is that just a blanket outlawing of guns?

      No one is allowed to own a gun?

      What is the punishment going to be for the roughly 100 million Americans or so that refuse to turn in their weapons?

      This would have to come from the Federal level, what do you think should be done to the States that refuse to make them illegal?

      There were States that fought the lockdowns, fought the mandates to be vaccinated or lose your job, I imagine for some states you would have to force this upon them, literally, through military occupation and seizure from house to house.

      1. Credence2 profile image78
        Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        That is something conservatives always say in an imaginary fear of federal takeover and tyranny. It is quite unlikely as there are 1.2 firearms for every American. Trying to relieve the country of so many guns is a fool's errand.

  23. Brenda Arledge profile image80
    Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years ago

    I'm having trouble with notifications for this one.

    It tells me I have one...but doesn't take me to the new one

    1. Nathanville profile image89
      Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I have the same problem when the comments become deeply buried in the  layers in the sub levels; I just have to keep a mental note of where the top levels are and then drill down to the required sub-levels.  I bit of a pain at times, but I've got used to it.

      1. Brenda Arledge profile image80
        Brenda Arledgeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Its a pain trying to sort through them.

        1. GA Anderson profile image88
          GA Andersonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I use chronological order instead of threaded, all the responses and replies are on one level—sorted by most recent.  It sounds like you are using threaded order.

          GA

          1. Nathanville profile image89
            Nathanvilleposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks for the tip, it seems quite cool, and potentially useful at time; although in comparing the two I prefer the threaded order when it works, switching to chronological when posts are deeply buried may well prove useful.

  24. Miebakagh57 profile image66
    Miebakagh57posted 2 years ago

    When Christopher Columbus discover America, guns was not well known by the primitive local aboridgins.                                      The weapons the locals mostly used were knives, bows, and arrows.                                        Critically, the gun powder was late in coming with the unwanted criminals from  Europe. Now, America has more guns than any other country, that is a threat to her citizens.                           Seriously, guns in America, or any other country is not an issue. The people are. The laws of the land is a militating factor likewise. To attemp to visit and amend the law to present reality, for example, does not make much sense to most people, say in America.                                             Is the saying those who live by the gun dies by the gun now true? No. It's the innocent and children that are dying.

  25. Miebakagh57 profile image66
    Miebakagh57posted 2 years ago

    Gun! Gun!! Gun!!! Gbum! So, its part of America culture? Gods own country?                                     I think that front hole, long or short where the hot lead spew out, equates to an ass hole? You Americans that I've come to know and like (many years ago, I was nikname. 'America' are terrific.                                                 God save America!

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)