Is exaggerating the same as lying?

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  1. suzzycue profile image92
    suzzycueposted 8 years ago

    Is exaggerating the same as lying?

    Do you exaggerate or do you tell it as it is all the time?

  2. AlexK2009 profile image89
    AlexK2009posted 8 years ago

    It depends on the situation. If looking for work I know others exaggerate and being honest is a handicap so I spin things positively. 

    (It seems to me honesty and professionalism are fatal handicaps but a reputation for them is a priceless asset, but I try to be honest and professional as much as possible.)

    In  day to day life exaggeration is something I  try to avoid.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Me too thanks for answering.

  3. capon profile image60
    caponposted 8 years ago

    I'm a bold hyperbolist and loving it!
    Tony

  4. stanwshura profile image78
    stanwshuraposted 8 years ago

    I believe exaggerating is lying.  I am very literal, so yes, I am *anal* about the truth.

  5. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 8 years ago

    In my opinion "deception" is lying. Therefore exaggerating is lying.  This would also include lying "by omission". Although legally lying by omission is not considered lying under oath nor is saying, "I don't recall." (Unless someone can prove your memory events are in tact.) ha ha
    I want to be told the truth and this is why I strive to be honest but tactful when dealing with others.

    1. Ericdierker profile image58
      Ericdierkerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      You might want to fact check that about omission, you could start by asking Martha Stewart.

    2. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you dashingscorpio.

    3. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Ericdierker , There is never a reason to fact check one's "opinion"! A lie is in the eye of the beholder. If you have (not been asked a question nor answered one) in court with a "false answer" then you have not legally "perjured" yourself.

  6. Ericdierker profile image58
    Ericdierkerposted 8 years ago

    I ain't never heard a story that was not made better by a healthy dose of embellishment. Poems and short stories need exaggeration. Warnings for safety sake need exaggeration. I once heard a man tell a fishing story and he had the exact weight and length of the fish ---- boring!  Same for how fast something is.

    Cast aside exaggeration and I think we lose some good books, The Bible and the Dharma come to mind. That line about all men being created equal -- So you can cast out the declaration of indedendence and constitution.
    I think you could probably put about 2 million sales people out of work.
    Forget about talking about baseball or pretty women.

    And if all my exaggerating here did not answer your question, I could do more!!!

    1. stanwshura profile image78
      stanwshuraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Perhaps all of the habitual hyperbole has desensitized us to the virtue, value and stand-alone interest the real truth holds!

    2. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Ericdierker. I loved your answer.

    3. Ericdierker profile image58
      Ericdierkerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe you are right. But you should have seen the one that got away!

    4. stanwshura profile image78
      stanwshuraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      LMAO!  "Had to have weighed a hundr'd pounds, I tell ya!  Nearly snapped my rod in two it did!   Reminds me uh the time I awmost reeled in a great white, Nearly tore my arm square off, swear m' life on it!"  smile

  7. celafoe profile image58
    celafoeposted 8 years ago

    there should be none If it pertains to scripture             otherwise     . 
    it all boils down to intent.   If your intent is to deceive it is wrong.  but if it is to make a point or for fun what does it hurt Those are the guidelines I use

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree celafoe.

  8. Markie W profile image61
    Markie Wposted 8 years ago

    Well, people have always told me that not telling the truth is the same as lying, so I guess it would be considered lying... which I guess makes me a liar because I tend to exaggerate when I'm all worked up in a story that I'm trying to make comical haha. But I only do this when I'm entertaining someone, not when talking seriously or telling a serious story.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Go ahead ,exaggerating to bring joy seems harmless to me.

    2. Apostle Jack profile image60
      Apostle Jackposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Just a little bit of poison,may seem harmless...but don't bet on it.
      A small lie is just as bad as a hand full of trouble.
      Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive.

    3. Markie W profile image61
      Markie Wposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I don't do it to deceive, Apostle Jack. My listeners always know when I'm exaggerating. Like when you're hungry and you say I'm starving. Same concept.

    4. Apostle Jack profile image60
      Apostle Jackposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I fell what you are saying Markie. But it is still a negative concept,no matter how small it is.
      Not to do it at all will bring rewards to your spirit than a negative return for doing it.
      Righteousness mean a lot to God. Even the small pieces.

    5. IDONO profile image61
      IDONOposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Apl Jack:  Compassion means a lot also. If you tell a lie to make a suffering person's day more tolerable, I think God will appreciate you sacrificing your own conscience for the sake of reaching out to comfort someone in need.

  9. benashiraz profile image61
    benashirazposted 8 years ago

    Depends on the situation. It's almost the same as lying, but is a different word, according to me.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I think it depends on whether you are hurting someone by doing it. Thank you all for the great discussion on lying. I enjoyed your answers.

    2. benashiraz profile image61
      benashirazposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yes you're right (:

  10. ytsenoh profile image84
    ytsenohposted 8 years ago

    What's the distinction between lying and embellishing?  Therein might be your answer.  Are there varying degrees of lying?  A lie is a lie.  It just sounds like a harsh word, so people sometimes use the term, "untruth."  If it's 10:20 in the morning and someone asks what time is it, do you say, 10:30?  That's an exaggeration, and it's not the truth, however, is it a malicious lie?  If it's not the truth, it's not the truth, but I don't know if I would define it as a malicious lie.

    1. Ericdierker profile image58
      Ericdierkerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      If you were my wife you would stick to it to get herself there on time. I look at my device and expect some push, that is cool I get our son there on time.

    2. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting concept ytsenoh.

    3. Janelle Coulton profile image58
      Janelle Coultonposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I do not condone lying in any form, but sometimes it is necessary if the sole purpose is to protect someone from being hurt. if the lie will hurt them in the long run, then don't do it.

  11. Healthy Mike profile image60
    Healthy Mikeposted 8 years ago

    Exaggerating is not the same as lying otherwise both words would be synonymous! My proposition is that exaggeration is merely the ugly younger kin to lying. It is stretching facts while lying is merely giving false information. When we exaggerate, we lower the threshold required to lie; more the reason why we don't take hyperbole seriously-it is merely a stylistic device. In a nut shell, when you lie, you do not necessary exaggerate but when you exaggerate you inch closer and closer to lying. Hit or miss?

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      That is true Mike.

    2. Apostle Jack profile image60
      Apostle Jackposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Exaggerating is false information. It is a part of what is call negativity.There is no in between.

  12. raajanees profile image59
    raajaneesposted 8 years ago

    not yet........................
    this include many things

  13. khmazz profile image78
    khmazzposted 8 years ago

    Yes, I think that they're the same...I am very strict with myself about always telling the truth, fabricating, exaggerating and lying have always seemed to lead to trouble in my life and I have worked very hard to rid it from my life.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I believe lying is negative and does bring trouble also khmazz.

  14. Apostle Jack profile image60
    Apostle Jackposted 8 years ago

    Yes. All negative thoughts...bring negative consequences,no matter how small.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      True fact. I agree Apostle Jack.

  15. lupine profile image75
    lupineposted 8 years ago

    It may not be lying, but is stretching the truth.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I like this stretching the truth answer Lupine!

    2. lupine profile image75
      lupineposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks suzzycue, I like to say it this way better because the word "lying" is a strong word that implicates others or yourself.

  16. TerryK81 profile image60
    TerryK81posted 8 years ago

    This is an easy question, but kinda difficult because there are so many to choose from. I'm going with the Gospel of Luke. I know, you asked "story" and not "book", but to me Jesus' life is the best. He is the way to live and be. I am getting back into working on my hub about the medical view of the Crucifixion, as I have been away handling personal difficulties. When I began all the research that I did so far into Jesus' death combined with medical research, I was blown away. How many know about this?? It uses authentic history from many honest historians plus medical research, and I think people need to look deeper into what Jesus endured for all of us and the symbology included. Otherwise, the book of Revelation is really great also. You asked a question that makes the mind pick and choose.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Terry an very interesting answer.

    2. TerryK81 profile image60
      TerryK81posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Um, somehow I answered another question in this forum, but my answer was to ANOTHER question.......I feel retarded

  17. MartinKennyDesign profile image60
    MartinKennyDesignposted 8 years ago

    In a very short answer - I think anything that doesn't include all the facts or has additions that persuade or sway towards the speakers desired intention are not honest. Over doing it by exaggerating is probably an unintentional lie.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Right on.

  18. Lor's Stories profile image62
    Lor's Storiesposted 8 years ago

    No. I thought I saw a snake in my sisters house. As I told the story the thing got bigger.
    Well it wasn't a snake. It was a mouse.
    So then I said it was a rat.
    But exaggerating helps you get your point across faster. Especially when it comes to crawling things in your house or wherever.

    1. Apostle Jack profile image60
      Apostle Jackposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Taking things out of proportion is like.Over-filling a glass of water ,it will not be a good ending to the story.

    2. Ericdierker profile image58
      Ericdierkerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Jack, not if the dog had no water in his bowl and he could drink the overflow.

  19. Lauren Amy Smith profile image61
    Lauren Amy Smithposted 8 years ago

    I'd say exaggeration is a form of lying. Although there is an element in truth in what is being said, it's still not reliable and can mislead. We all do it though, I often exaggerate to make a story more interesting or to get my point of view across, just in our nature I guess.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yes Lauren, it is human nature but some would disagree.

  20. rosaleelaws profile image60
    rosaleelawsposted 8 years ago

    I think exaggerating is the same as lying, because not telling the whole truth is lying.  Whether it is lying by omission or exaggeration which is just on the other end of the spectrum, adding to the truth.  I think I'm learning in life that everyone is human and not every human will be 100% honest all of the time. Unfortunately lying is not black and white either, for instance when someone lies to protect someone's feelings. Personally, I still prefer utter honesty.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Me too rosaleelaws and trust goes right along the same path.

  21. profile image50
    ellocin27posted 8 years ago

    Well, exaggerate means you over react on a certain situation or something. And lying means you didn't tell something because it's either you're scared to be scolded or you're hiding something. I lie but when I lie I don't exaggerate. wink

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting point of view. thank you ellocin27

  22. manatita44 profile image84
    manatita44posted 8 years ago

    Most of us who exaggerate, do lie. There is something called embellishment which is quite similar, but it is the positive form. Spiritual teachers use this to entertain their students and give them joy. Embellishments feed the heart, Exaggerations come from the mind and tend to feed the mind.

  23. Amy Pirozzolo profile image60
    Amy Pirozzoloposted 8 years ago

    No, exaggerating and lying are not the same...Exaggerating is embellishing...Lying tends to mean you are significantly not telling the truth...

    I tend to truly tell it like it is, although everyone embellishes sometimes...

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Very true Amy.

  24. Vlorsutes profile image87
    Vlorsutesposted 8 years ago

    I believe that it depends on what is being exaggerated. For example, if I were asked whether or not I finished a project, and I answered that I did a good while ago (when in reality I had completed it maybe a minute or so ago), it's technically not lying since you are telling the truth towards the given question. You were simply altering the circumstances to bolster my position while still being truthful to what I was asked.

    That being said, if you go by a strict definition of a lie, which is not telling the truth, then I can understand where the idea of exaggeration being considered a lie would come from. You are painting a false picture of the event in some regard, whether it be a minor alteration of the details or such a significant change that it doesn't even resemble what actually happened.

    1. suzzycue profile image92
      suzzycueposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      awesome answer Vlorsutes

  25. IDONO profile image61
    IDONOposted 8 years ago

    If this makes any sense, I think exaggerating is more manipulating than lying. I don't believe it is done with the purpose of deceiving. I believe it's done to make what you are speaking of more interesting and to gain more of a person's undivided attention. If the facts of a story are mundane and boring, human nature tells us to make it more interesting and the only way to do that is to make the story bigger.

 
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